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Look no further than renowned culinary author David Lebovitz's My Paris Kitchen, the cookbook companion to his world-famous blog. Learn the classics right the first time or dive a little deeper to lesser-known French dishes influenced by countless ethnic cuisines. First up, a delicious and colorful Israeli couscous flavored with preserved lemons. 

Look no further than renowned culinary author David Lebovitz's My Paris Kitchen — the cookbook companion to his world-famous blog and a must-have for the dedicated home cook. Learn the classics right the first time, or dive a little deeper to lesser-known French dishes influenced by countless ethnic cuisines that you'll make again and again. First up, a delicious and colorful Israeli couscous flavored with preserved lemons. You can find them at your Middle Eastern grocery. 

Israeli couscous are little pearls of pasta, elsewhere called pastina, which means “little pasta,” and when toasted it’s known as fregola sarda. Since they have more substance, I think they hold up a little better to North African-style braised meats than traditional couscous. (Orzo is a good substitute for the Israeli couscous.) To change things around a bit, you can vary the dried fruit or swap in fresh mint or cilantro for the parsley. Another nut, such as toasted hazelnuts or almonds or even pine nuts, could be used in place of the pistachios. 

Reprinted with permission from My Paris Kitchen