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Photo: Alberto Peroli
Brining has long been the professional chef’s secret method for keeping some of the leaner cuts of meat tender and moist. I find brining works great with pork loin, which is pleasantly mild, and in this simple recipe I add a bay leaf and peppercorns for a subtle flavor accent.

Brining has long been the professional chef’s secret method for keeping some of the leaner cuts of meat tender and moist. Soaking or marinating meat in a salt solution tenderizes it and adds water, which in turn slowly cooks out when it’s in the oven. Since roasting is one of the more dehydrating forms of cooking, adding extra moisture is a good guarantee your meat won’t dry out.

Brining has become increasingly popular with home cooks, as has the practice of adding flavor by introducing more ingredients than just salt to the brine. I find brining works great with pork loin, which is pleasantly mild, and in this simple recipe I add a bay leaf and peppercorns for a subtle flavor accent.