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Everybody might be talking about the Hearth chef-owner’s bone broth business, but Marco Canora has long been an advocate for healthy cooking. His new book, A Good Food Day, serves as both a recipe guide and a treatise for following simple rules about healthy living. It's tenderloin time.

Everybody might be talking about the Hearth chef-owner’s bone broth business, but Marco Canora has long been an advocate for healthy cooking. His new book, A Good Food Day, serves as both a recipe guide and a treatise for following simple rules about healthy living.

I’ll admit, I was a bit of a trash-talker when it came to pork tenderloin. I found it beyond boring, the boneless, skinless chicken breast of the pork world. As I started adding more lean cuts of meat to my routine, I felt compelled to come up with a way to nudge pork tenderloin into the realm of the delicious, tender, juicy meats I love. This simple recipe nailed it. I give the tenderloin a Tuscan treatment via a quick pan sauce that includes fennel and a finely chopped mixture of rosemary, sage and garlic. To compensate for the lack of fat in tenderloin, I slice it into medallions to increase the amount of pork touching the pan (more browning = more flavor), and cook it hard and fast. The last thing you want to do is cook the tenderloin whole or in thick steaks, which have far more bland interior meat than the seared, browned, caramelized meat you want.

Reprinted with permission from A Good Food Day