The original carpaccio is a dish of thinly sliced raw beef. Next time you eat carpaccio, be aware that you’re eating a piece of art history. Look closely at your beef carpaccio: that crimson hue may be familiar to you (think hard, art snobs)…ah yes, it is the very crimson used in the 15th century paintings of Venetian painter, Vittore Carpaccio! This is what the owner of Harry’s Bar in Venice saw when he created this dish for a countess who couldn’t eat cooked meat. That was reportedly in 1950, and the name has stuck. The term carpaccio is now used more loosely to describe anything that is raw and thinly sliced, from fruits and vegetables to fish. 

Use today’s Word of the Day (for vegetable carpaccio): The Mighty Mandoline Slicer