friedhotchicken
Nashville is famous for a thriving music and nightlife scene. The city’s famous hot chicken pairs perfectly with both.

Renowned Southern food writer, blogger and cookbook author Jennifer Justus has a new book out, approved by the likes of Sean Brock and John T. Edge, that will send you running for the Music City’s vast bounty of delicious cuisine.

Also see: We Took A Nashville Chef To Two NYC Hot Chicken Restaurants. Here’s What We Found.

André Prince Jeffries gave me strict orders: no sugar in the hot chicken. But I also believe part of the fun of cooking your own hot chicken comes from figuring out the spice blend you like best. And following the lead of the folks at Hattie B’s, I do like a touch of brown sugar to balance out the heat. I use red pepper flakes for texture and an added layer of spice, and I like a touch of cumin for woodsy depth. Applying the spicy paste after the chicken has been fried keeps the cayenne from scorching, and it allows the cook to customize the degree of heat per piece of chicken. Go ahead and experiment to make your own blend. And apologies to Ms. Jeffries. I’ll always visit Prince’s to taste the original.

Reprinted with permission from Nashville Eats