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I've been putting off publishing my scallop tartare recipe for at least five years. It's so delicious and user-friendly that I've been hoarding it, mine all mine, but let that be a testiment to how much I love Food Republic. Run, little signature proprietary recipe, be free!

I've been putting off publishing my scallop tartare recipe for at least five years. It's so delicious and user-friendly that I've been hoarding it, mine all mine, but let that be a testiment to how much I love Food Republic. Run, little signature proprietary recipe, be free! Go on now, git! Awh, it went. So much for recipe loyalty.

You will need a melon baller. This is non-negotiable. Scooping the flesh out of cucumber hunks may sound tedious and boring, but when you realize how easily and precisely this tool carves out the perfect little bowl, you may quit your job and go into full-time cucumber bowl production. Good thing I don't have to choose, right?

Ensure that your scallops are dry, meaning no water has been added to them previously for preservation purposes. If you touch one with your fingertip, it should stick a little. If it's slippery or slimy in the least, it's not a dry scallop. Only dry scallops are fit for raw consumption (or cooked, for that matter). Using the best-quality sesame oil and Japanese mayo will also make a big difference as well.

Make these little beauties for your next shindig involving food. If they'll be out in the open for an extended period, serve them on a plate or platter over a bed of crushed ice so they stay cool as a…wow, almost walked right into that one.