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Trust Steven Raichlen, author of the best-selling Barbecue! Bible, when it comes to making great dinners with all the confidence in the world. His new book, Man Made Meals, is your no-nonsense highway to something meaty, preferably grilled, and easy enough to make on a weeknight. Itching to update your fajita routine? Pork is here to help. 

You can trust Steven Raichlen, author of the best-selling Barbecue! Bible, when it comes to making great dinners with all the confidence in the world. His newest book, Man Made Meals, is your no-nonsense highway to something meaty, preferably grilled, and easy enough to make on a weeknight. Itching to update your fajita routine? Pork is here to help. 

It’s hard to remember American cuisine without fajitas, but there was a time when you had to travel to Texas (specifically to Ninfa’s restaurant in Houston) to try them. Who knew that a cheap cut of beef — the skirt steak — would become a popular party food? (Fajita means “little girdle” in Spanish.) Here’s a pork version, fragrant with cinnamon, orange and ancho chiles.

In Oaxaca, they use thinly sliced pork shoulder, which is loaded with fat, so it stays moist on the grill. If you have the patience, thinly slice boneless pork shoulder (we’re talking poker chip thin here), or bribe your butcher to do it. Otherwise, use pork loin or tenderloin thinly sliced across the grain. It helps if you partially freeze it first. Crema is Mexican sour cream. (It’s a little more sour and pungent than American sour cream.) Look for it in Hispanic markets. Pure powdered ancho or pasilla chiles are available in some supermarkets, but if you can’t find them, substitute regular pure chile powder.

Reprinted with permission from Man Made Meals