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Photo: Ed Anderson
This cookbook was inspired by David Simon's award-winning HBO series, Treme, and no offense to Breaking Bad or anything, but we'd rather cook recipes from this show, thanks. Learn simple homestyle recipes for your favorite New Orleans dishes. Ever made pralines in the microwave? Prepare to be blown away. 

This cookbook was inspired by David Simon's award-winning HBO series, Treme, and no offense to Breaking Bad or anything, but we'd rather cook recipes from this show, thanks. Learn simple homestyle recipes for your favorite New Orleans dishes. Ever made pralines in the microwave? Prepare to be blown away.

You would think I would have been the one telling my mother about microwave pralines. But no —she was the one telling me. I guess after all those years of toil and trouble cooking from scratch, she was glad to see an easier way. These taste just as good as the ones we used to make on the stove, I promise you. But one thing you need to be aware of: if it’s real humid, sometimes the pralines don’t set right. Nowhere on Earth is more humid than New Orleans, and I make them here all the time. But don’t think you can be inside making pralines on a day when it’s hot and rainy outside.

In the unlikely event your first try produces a batter that comes out too runny to set up properly into distinct pralines, don’t worry: It will still make a generous 3 cups of “praline sauce” to serve over ice cream or unfrosted cake. And in case you want to make the praline sauce on purpose, the instructions are also in the recipe.

You don’t have to have a handle on the dish you use. But if you don’t want to burn the hell out of your hand, it’ll help. In fact, I usually wear heavy oven mitts, too, when I’m doing this dish. Also, please note: chopped nuts are too small for pralines and pecan halves are too big. Cut the halves in half.

Reprinted with permission from Treme