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Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/booheadswife/4903196169/">booheadswife</a> on Flickr
Baba ganoush and hummus are pretty much like brothers who could agree on everything except chicks. Well, chickpeas. If you switch out hummus' chickpeas with eggplant, the result is a silky, tangy spread you'll be enjoying by the spoonful. Like hummus and tzatziki, baba ghanoush works as a dip, spread and even just straight up as a healthy side. 

Baba ganoush and hummus are pretty much like brothers who could agree on everything except chicks. Well, chickpeas. If you switch out hummus’ chickpeas with eggplant, the result is a silky, tangy spread you’ll be enjoying by the spoonful. Like hummus and tzatziki, baba ghanoush works as a dip, spread and even just straight up as a healthy side. 

Much like a lot of other Middle Eastern specialities, the origins are contested, but one thing worth noting is the funky name. Baba, what? Well, baba means father in Arabic, and ganoush translates to flirtatious. So yes, the flirtatious father.

The dish is especially popular in France — it was brought over by the large Arab immigrant population. In French, baba ganoush is called caviar d’aubergine, or eggplant caviar, although it obviously has nothing to do fish eggs. Taking a humble vegetable and slapping on a fancy schmancy title, how French!