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Chef Barton Seaver is Director of the Healthy and Sustainable Food Program at Harvard's School of Public Health, and a damn good cookbook author. His new book, Where There's Smoke, is on our list of spring must-reads. First up, grilled duck confit. You heard it here first. 

Chef Barton Seaver is Director of the Healthy and Sustainable Food Program at Harvard’s School of Public Health, and a damn good cookbook author. His new book, Where There’s Smoke, is on our list of spring must-reads. First up, grilled duck confit. You heard it here first. 

Traditionally, duck was turned into confit as a way to preserve it; the salted and slowly cooked legs covered in a thick layer of their own fat would keep for many months. Like many dishes born of rural efficiency, confit is now rarely found outside of high-end restaurants. If you haven’t ever tried duck confit, you need to — it is incredible in a way you can’t even imagine.

Though I provide a from-scratch recipe, the good news is that you can buy already prepared confit that is very good; my favorite is that made by D’Artagnan. Whether you make or buy your confit, the fatty legs and meltingly tender meat are greatly enhanced once you crisp the skin over a smoky fire and serve the dish with a salad of crisp endive and aromatic herbs.

Reprinted with permission from Where There’s Smoke