Grab a copy of The Ultimate Tortilla Press Cookbook and never buy supermarket corn tortillas again. It’s a definitive guide to pressing and baking your way to homemade tortillas, and will ruin you for all others, forever. Once you master the basics, move on and learn all about flavored corn tortillas. 

Reprinted with permission from The Ultimate Tortilla Press Cookbook

Flavoring and coloring corn tortillas is simply a matter of adding things to the basic dough. This can be done two ways: by adding dried herbs and spices or by infusing the tortillas with a flavored liquid.

Use them in any recipe for corn tortillas. Suggested uses are included.

How To Spice Homemade Corn Tortillas

Use ground spices, such as red chile or chili powder, pureed black beans in the dry ingredients.

For Cumin Corn Tortillas: Add 1 tablespoon (7 g) of ground dried cumin to 2 cups (240 g) of masa harina and use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Fried Tortilla Chips, Loaded Nachos, Mexican Street Tacos.

For Garlic Corn Tortillas: Add 1 tablespoon (10 g) of granulated garlic or 2 teaspoons of garlic powder (or to taste) to 2 cups (240 g) masa harina and use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Fried Tortilla Chips, Puffy Tacos, with Pinto or Black Bean Soup.

For Chile con Corn Tortillas: Add ⅛ to ¼ cup (15 to 30 g) (depending on desired heat level) of ground dried red chile or chili powder to 2 cups (240 g) of masa harina and use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Fried Tortilla Chips, Stacked Chicken Enchiladas with Spicy Chicken.

For Black Bean Corn Tortillas: Drain 1 cup (240 g) of canned black beans. In work bowl of food processor, combine the drained black beans with 2 cups (240 g) masa harina (flour, if using) and salt. Process until all the ingredients are well-blended. Proceed as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Baja Fish Tacos, Veggie Enchiladas, Breakfast Tacos with Mexican-Style Breakfast Potatoes.

How To Flavor-Infuse Corn Tortillas

Once you get “the feel” of good masa, adjusting the proportions somewhat to get the right consistency of the dough will come naturally to you, and your flavored tortillas will be foolproof.

For Cilantro and Cumin Corn Tortillas: In a blender jar, combine 1 cup (16 g) of loosely packed cilantro leaves, 1 tablespoon (7 g) of ground cumin (or 2 tablespoons (12 g) of whole cumin seeds), and 1¼ cups (285 ml) of water. Process until smooth, about 1 minute. Use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Fried Tortilla Chips, Beef Enchiladas with Tex-Mex Chili Gravy, Taco Salad.

For Cilantro Lime Corn Tortillas: In a blender jar, combine 1 cup (16 g) of loosely packed cilantro leaves, 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of lime juice, and 1¼ cups (285 ml) of water. Process until smooth, about 1 minute. Use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Fried Tortilla Chips with Guacamole, Baja Fish Tacos, Stacked Shrimp or Crab Enchiladas with Tomato and Green Chile Sauce.

Weed Feed

As marijuana products become legal, watch for marijuana-infused masa for tortillas, gorditas and sopes. Hot off the comal, they’re delicious with Canna Butter, i.e. cannabis laced.

For Red Chile Corn Tortillas: Remove the stems and seeds from enough dried red chiles (such as pasilla, ancho, or guajillo) to make 1 cup (37 g), lightly packed. Rinse the chillies with cool water. Place the chillies and 1¼ cups (285 ml) of water in a medium saucepan over high heat. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Set aside off the heat for 10 minutes. In a blender jar or work bowl of a food processor, process the chillies and their liquid until smooth, about 1 minute. Pour the pureed chilli mixture through a fine strainer into a small bowl, pressing with the back of a spoon to extract as much liquid as possible; discard the solids. Add enough water to make 1¼ to 1⅓ cups (285 to 315 ml) of liquid. Use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Cheese Enchiladas with Queso, Arizona Cheese Crisps, Migas.

For Roasted Green Chile Corn Tortillas: Roast 2 large poblanos, 4 to 5 jalapenos, 6 to 8 serranos, or other desired fresh chillies (page 40) to make ½ cup (72 g) peeled, seeded, and finely chopped roasted chiles. Place the chopped chillies and 1¼ cups (285 ml) of water in a blender container or the work bowl of a food processor. Process until smooth, about 1 minute. Use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Roast or Hot Smoked Duck, Mexican Street Tacos with Pork and Refried Black Beans, Nacho’s Nachos.

For Toasted Garlic Corn Tortillas: Peel enough garlic cloves to make 1 cup (136 g). Place the cloves in single layer in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Toast until golden on one side, about 3 to 4 minutes. Turn and toast until golden on all sides, about 3 to 4 minutes longer. Remove from the pan and allow to cool. Place the toasted garlic cloves and 1¼ cups (285 ml) of water in a blender container or the work bowl of a food processor. Process until smooth, about 1 minute. Use as directed for Corn Tortillas.

Suggested uses: Loaded Nachos, Veggie Enchiladas and New Mexico Red Chile Sauce, Breakfast Tacos with Scrambled Eggs.

Roasting Fresh Chiles

To roast fresh chiles (such as poblanos, jalapeños, bell peppers, or any other chile): Rinse and dry the peppers. Place in a heavy skillet over high heat or in a heavy sheet pan under a high heat broiler. When the skin on the heat side blackens and blisters, turn and roast some more until all the sides are blistered and blackened. Cover the skillet with a lid or place the roasted peppers in a heavy plastic bag with zipper. Press out all the air, seal, and allow to cool enough to handle, about 10 minutes. Using your fingers and the tip of a sharp paring knife, slip the skin off the roasted peppers. Rinse the peppers to remove the seeds. Discard any stems. Use as directed in recipes.