Troubleshoot Your Thanksgiving Waffle, Waste Less Valuable Stuffing

Nov 29, 2013 3:00 pm

A very special post-Thanksgiving hack of the day

how to make a stuffing waffle
Now that you know how to make a stuffing waffle, hop to it while the leftovers are still fresh!
 

We didn't invent the stuffing waffle, we just endorse it heartily. That's right, your leftover stuffing can and should be wafflized. Just imagine the insane Thanksgiving sandwich you can make between two waffles made of Thanksgiving! You can even theme it "turkey and waffles." Instagram the hell out of it and watch the comments from your friends roll it. But first, pull it off. Here are a few tips.

Uniformity makes things easier
The waffle method works best with moister, mushier stuffing, therefore we can't in all good faith recommend you do this with our actual waffle stuffing, not to be confused to stuffing waffles. If you're working with chunkier stuffing — chestnuts, sausage hunks, oysters — you might want to remove the largest pieces to ensure your waffle remains in one piece and nothing burns. 

Add a little liquid
Waffles are made out of batter, remember? Don't blend your stuffing into a liquid, that would be gross; however, do add a little extra chicken stock (or if you want to do it right, melted butter) to help loosen it into something you can load into a waffle iron. Stiff, dry, cold stuffing won't do the trick, so make sure you bring the leftovers to room temperature or microwave lightly before attempting.

Don't open the iron to check to see if the waffle is done
We'd give the same advice to regular waffles, too — if you open the iron, the thing will fall apart, never to come back together. Don't leave the iron's side because this treat goes from perfectly golden brown to burned in 30 seconds — hang out and when you smell toasty goodness, your waffle is ready (about twice as long as its batter-based breathren).

Don't let anyone tell you what to do with it
We like sandwiching more leftovers between stuffing waffles, but if you want to douse it with maple syrup, maple syrup mixed with gravy (do not judge us), or even maple syrup mixed with gravy and a little cranberry sauce (do not judge us!) you are free to do so. That's what Thanksgiving and its subsequent leftoves are all about. Freedom. Sausage, egg and cheese on stuffing waffles? That sounds like a liberating morning/afternoon/evening

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