Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com Where Food, Drink & Culture Unite Mon, 23 Jan 2017 18:00:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 Cook It Tonight: 10 Comforting Winter Chicken Recipes http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/chicken-recipe-roundup/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/chicken-recipe-roundup/#respond Mon, 23 Jan 2017 18:00:32 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=164052 Check out 10 of our most seasonal, comfort-food-forward winter chicken recipes. Few ingredients are more versatile than a couple of pounds of quality chicken — breasts, thighs, the whole dang thing. Need some inspiration for that pack of poultry in your fridge? Great, that’s what we’re cooking tonight, too!  From crisp cutlets to tender braises, where there’s […]

The post Cook It Tonight: 10 Comforting Winter Chicken Recipes appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
Check out 10 of our most seasonal, comfort-food-forward winter chicken recipes. Few ingredients are more versatile than a couple of pounds of quality chicken — breasts, thighs, the whole dang thing. Need some inspiration for that pack of poultry in your fridge? Great, that’s what we’re cooking tonight, too!  From crisp cutlets to tender braises, where there’s a wing, there’s a way.

Recipe: Chicken Milanese Topped With Fennel Salad

Mounding the salad on top of the chicken, with its crispy, featherweight crust, results in a wonderful combination of textures, temperatures and flavors.

bacon and maple roast chicken recipe
You love bacon and maple, so why not invite chicken to the party?

Recipe: Bacon And Maple Roast Chicken

First, the chicken skin gets nice and crispy while roasting, but instead of only tasting like chicken skin, it also tastes like bacon. And second, since the bacon is under the skin, its flavors are relatively trapped under there and so, with nowhere else for the bacon juices to go, they start to seep into the breast meat of the bird, turning a relatively moderately flavored cut of meat into a delightfully bacon-filled fillet.

chicken kiev with kale recipe
Show kale the ultimate respect with this recipe. (Photo: Quentin Bacon.)

Recipe: Chicken Kiev With Goat Cheese And Chopped Greens

Renowned chef Mario Batali’s new cookbook, America — Farm to Table, is a celebration of local farmers around the country. Travel from coast to coast with one of the nation’s most beloved culinary faces and see how the master uses local fare to everyone’s advantage. Ready to show kale the ultimate respect? Stuff it into juicy chicken, pan-fry and enjoy.

chickenbluecheese
Under this beautifully crispy chicken skin lies a funky, earthy combination of blue cheese and walnuts. Serve with mushrooms and prepare to make it again soon!

Recipe: Chicken Legs Stuffed With Blue Cheese And Walnuts

Chef, culinary instructor, cooking-show host and James Beard Award–winning cookbook author Joanne Weir has a new collection of recipes out, Kitchen Gypsy, and you’re going to want it. Weir, a veteran of the famed Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California, specializes in simple, hearty food, focusing on the quality and availability of local ingredients in order to make meals that are as authentically delicious as they are beautiful to behold. Peruse the recipes, read her excellent tales and tell us you’re not struck with an immediate, urgent craving for blue cheese–stuffed chicken.

Photo: Victoria Pearson
A healthier version of fried chicken. (Photo: Victoria Pearson.)

Recipe: Buttermilk-Baked Chicken

The key to any good fried chicken recipe is a buttermilk marinade, and this lightened-up version takes the same cue. Thankfully, it’s still pretty easy to capture the crunchy goodness of fried chicken with a baked alternative.

lemonchicken
A classic pairing of chicken and couscous, all zested up!

Recipe: Lemon Roasted Chicken With Moroccan Couscous

For this particular dish, I’ve added lemon just to give it some freshness, and I created a quick pan sauce, but you can feel free to skip it. The Moroccan couscous — with its mixture of warm spices, pine nuts, and currants — adds enough flavor on its own.

chickenrice (1)
Haianese chicken rice is a dish beloved around Asia. If you see it on a menu, order it. If you don’t see it, make it.

Recipe: Haianese Chicken And Rice

Some Chinatowns lean Vietnamese, others Thai. Some boast regional Chinese menu items you’ve never seen before, and some have the best darn plate of chicken and rice this side of the Yangtze. Both are cooked with lots of ginger in fresh broth, resulting in tender meat and flavorful rice so good you may never cook rice in regular water again.

normandy chciken
Creamy, tangy, cider-spiked chicken straight from France. There’s only one pairing for this classic comfort food, so don’t use the whole bottle on the poulet!

Recipe: Normandy Cider-Braised Chicken

Normandy is famous for its apple-growing, so there they cook chicken in local cider. In Alsace, the same dish is prepared using Riesling wine. I think this dish is delicious served with buttered noodles, but purists often like it with mashed potatoes.

potpie
Chicken pot pie at its best: smoked and infused with sweet potato.

Recipe: Bobby Flay’s Smoked Chicken Pot Pie

This spin on traditional chicken pot pie, a cold-weather comfort food staple, is a fun alternative to the tried-and-true, with some smoky flavor from chicken (or chipotle seasoning, depending on how you spin it). The crust features a little sweetness and color from the sweet potatoes. Make it for a crowd and watch everyone dig in with delight.

chicken dum pukht recipe
Use this curry base as a blank canvas. If you’re craving chicken, shrimp, vegetables or tofu, curry it!

Recipe: Indian Slow-Braised Chicken Dum Pukht

This curry is a great blank canvas and a superb way to feed a bunch of people who are tired of the same-old dishes one makes for a crowd. It’s also my ultimate comfort food — my freezer is full of this dish at various stages, from the onion-garlic-ginger blend to the finished product. You can even simmer halved medium-boiled eggs in the sauce for a few minutes and serve on toast for one of the heartiest vegetarian brunches around.

The post Cook It Tonight: 10 Comforting Winter Chicken Recipes appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/chicken-recipe-roundup/feed/ 0
Question: Why Are Some Cows Fed Candy? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/question-why-are-some-cows-fed-candy/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/question-why-are-some-cows-fed-candy/#respond Mon, 23 Jan 2017 17:32:13 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=164057 Hundreds of thousands of red Skittles cascaded onto a road in rural Wisconsin last week. The sheriff’s department traced the origins of the candy to a farm. Why would a farm need a literal ton of Skittles? It turns out, humans aren’t they only ones who eat them for a sugar rush. But why are […]

The post Question: Why Are Some Cows Fed Candy? appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
Hundreds of thousands of red Skittles cascaded onto a road in rural Wisconsin last week. The sheriff’s department traced the origins of the candy to a farm. Why would a farm need a literal ton of Skittles? It turns out, humans aren’t they only ones who eat them for a sugar rush. But why are some cows fed candy?

Unsellable candy makes great cattle feed, livestock nutritionist Ki Fanning told CNNMoney. “(It) is a very good way for producers to reduce feed cost, and to provide less expensive food for consumers.” Just about anything sugary and processed can be sold at a bulk discount from manufacturers at half the price of grain-based feed.

Is it safe to be feeding candy to cows? Considering what’s fed to some industrial-farmed cattle…perhaps. Live Science consulted with John Waller, a professor of animal nutrition at the University of Tennessee, who found it to be a “viable diet.” “It keeps fat material from going out in the landfill, and it’s a good way to get nutrients in these cattle. The alternative would be to put [the candy] in a landfill somewhere,” he said. He added that farmers have been cutting cattle feed with byproducts for decades.

The post Question: Why Are Some Cows Fed Candy? appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/question-why-are-some-cows-fed-candy/feed/ 0
Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group To Invest In Joe Coffee http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/danny-meyer-invest-joe-coffee/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/danny-meyer-invest-joe-coffee/#respond Mon, 23 Jan 2017 16:56:58 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=164091 Danny Meyer and the Union Square Hospitality Group announced today that it will be investing in New York City’s Joe Coffee. Joe Coffee, which has shops in New York and Philadelphia, will use the capital investment to grow the coffee brand across the country. The USHG will also provide industry insight and resources to Joe Coffee’s leadership […]

The post Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group To Invest In Joe Coffee appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
Danny Meyer and the Union Square Hospitality Group announced today that it will be investing in New York City’s Joe Coffee.

Joe Coffee, which has shops in New York and Philadelphia, will use the capital investment to grow the coffee brand across the country. The USHG will also provide industry insight and resources to Joe Coffee’s leadership team.

“We chose to make this investment with Joe Coffee because they are dedicated to the pursuit of making flawless coffee, are led by passionate and exceptional management and share the same hospitality values as USHG,” Meyer, CEO of USHG, says in a statement.

Joe Coffee opened its first shop in the West Village in 2003 and was an early pioneer of the third wave coffee movement. Founder Jonathan Rubinstein is an advocate of coffee education.

Back in July 2016, Meyer said that coffee shops are a good indicator of the next biggest neighborhood.

The post Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group To Invest In Joe Coffee appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/danny-meyer-invest-joe-coffee/feed/ 0
Chef Tracy Chang Wastes No Time In Her Fitness Routine http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/chef-tracy-chang-fitness-routine/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/chef-tracy-chang-fitness-routine/#respond Mon, 23 Jan 2017 16:00:17 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=163960 In honor of Food Republic’s annual Healthy Living Month, we reached out to chefs about their diet and fitness routines and will be featuring these interviews throughout January. Next up is Tracy Chang of Pagu in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Having grown up in her grandmother’s Japanese restaurant and trained at Paris’s Le Cordon Bleu and later in Spain at […]

The post Chef Tracy Chang Wastes No Time In Her Fitness Routine appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
tracy chang
Chef Tracy Chang does squats while she brushes her teeth.

In honor of Food Republic’s annual Healthy Living Month, we reached out to chefs about their diet and fitness routines and will be featuring these interviews throughout January. Next up is Tracy Chang of Pagu in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Having grown up in her grandmother’s Japanese restaurant and trained at Paris’s Le Cordon Bleu and later in Spain at a three-Michelin-star restaurant, Tracy Chang mixes European and Japanese flavors at newly opened Pagu. Whilst opening a restaurant, some may find it difficult to fit exercise into their routine. Not for Chang. She finds a way to perform squats and push-ups during her morning and evening routines. Chang has also served as a teaching fellow at Harvard’s science and cooking program.

What’s the first thing you eat or drink in the morning?
A smoothie of açai, banana, blueberries, strawberries, almond milk and sheep’s-milk yogurt.

How do you manage to keep in shape and not snack while always being in kitchens?
I play soccer and go to hot yoga (vinyasa). I am tasting throughout the day in the kitchen. I also have quite a large team and try to sit down with a different group each day for family meal.

What’s your fitness routine?
With a restaurant opening, it’s hard to make time for a “fitness routine,” but I take advantage of idle time in the bathroom. When I wake up in the morning and before I go to bed, while I brush my teeth, I do squats and calf raises. When I rinse with mouthwash, I do push-ups against my bathroom sink. 

Do you practice any wellness routines, such as meditation, acupuncture, massage?
I recently found an incredible massage place in Chinatown that does ba guan (cupping) and gua sha (spooning). I also take a bath a few times a week and “meditate.”

Any New Year’s eating resolutions?
More time to share meals with friends and family. The whole point of opening a restaurant was to share meals with friends and family, but during service, it’s hard to walk away from the expo and kitchen and sit down with a table and eat something.

Have you ever done a fad diet? Juice cleanse?
Never. I believe in moderation and not “shocking” my body. However I won’t say a juice cleanse retreat in Bali doesn’t sound enticing…mostly from the standpoint of can I mentally do it versus physically. I like to believe I can physically do anything.

Have you ever struggled with your weight?
I was a tri-season athlete growing up (soccer, basketball, lacrosse) and had a very healthy appetite. It wasn’t necessarily healthful (there was a lot of junk food readily available at school — candy, chips, ice cream). These experiences motivate me to create healthier snacks (e.g. Pagu granola!). As an athlete, I never struggled with weight. If anything, I was always slightly underweight as a kid compared to my peers.

Do you have any go-to, quick-fire healthy recipes that you can provide us off the top of your head?
I love to eat eggs, namely omelets. I love watching the Jacques Pepin and Julia Child video on omelets. I make mine with Spanish olive oil, not butter. Don’t tell Julia.

Tools

  • Medium mixing bowl
  • Medium whisk
  • 1 8-inch nonstick pan
  • 1 pair wooden chopsticks
  • Plate

Ingredients

  • 3 eggs, whisked well to incorporate whites and yolks
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon Spanish Arbequina Olive Oil
  • ¼ teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon chives, finely sliced

Directions

  1. In medium mixing bowl, whisk eggs well to incorporate whites and yolks.
  2. Add salt and whisk well.
  3. Heat pan on medium-high.
  4. Add olive oil.
  5. Add eggs and using chopsticks, immediately stir vigorously, shaking pan in circular motions to incorporate air.
  6. Eggs should be fluffy and runny.
  7. Turn heat to low.
  8. When eggs are still slightly runny, add chives and black pepper.
  9. Using Jacques and Julia’s technique, fold eggs back with chopsticks, rolling egg unto itself to form a leaf shape.
  10. If still running, heat a bit. If not, remove from heat and plate.

I like a light golden exterior (lends a bit of sweetness when eggs caramelize) and a soft, slightly runny, fluffy interior. For the light golden exterior, you can also crank the heat to high for the last 10 seconds.

The post Chef Tracy Chang Wastes No Time In Her Fitness Routine appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/chef-tracy-chang-fitness-routine/feed/ 0
The Way To Save The Restaurant Industry? Put The Fast In Fine Dining. http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/save-restaurant-industry-fast-fine/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/save-restaurant-industry-fast-fine/#respond Mon, 23 Jan 2017 14:00:51 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=163603 At first glance Corridor seems like any other buzzworthy San Francisco restaurant: low lights, curated playlists, thoughtful wine list, reclaimed-wood tables set with stemmed glassware, artisanal china, fine flatware and a California-inspired American menu of on-trend plates — roasted carrot and citrus salad with coriander spiced yogurt and crispy quinoa; pan-roasted salmon with roasted cauliflower, […]

The post The Way To Save The Restaurant Industry? Put The Fast In Fine Dining. appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>

At first glance Corridor seems like any other buzzworthy San Francisco restaurant: low lights, curated playlists, thoughtful wine list, reclaimed-wood tables set with stemmed glassware, artisanal china, fine flatware and a California-inspired American menu of on-trend plates — roasted carrot and citrus salad with coriander spiced yogurt and crispy quinoa; pan-roasted salmon with roasted cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, caper vinaigrette — prepared by a brigade of classically trained chefs. It’s run by a team of Michael Mina veterans and received a three-star review from the San Francisco Chronicle. It’s a fairly standard fine-dining operation in most respects, really, except for one little thing. There are no waiters. No one will take your order. Instead, when you arrive, you’ll walk up to a counter to order your entire meal there. You’ll be handed a discreet GPS device (it does not buzz), which locates you in the restaurant so a runner can deliver your food. Once seated, floor staff will refill water glasses, reorder drinks and add desserts as needed. Welcome to “fast fine,” a hybrid dining phenomenon sweeping San Francisco thanks to revolutionaries like Souvla, Barzotto and RT Rotisserie and soon to arrive in New York City with Daniel Humm and Will Guidara’s Made Nice.

“Fast fine” is a bold new concept built on the back of one of the restaurant industry’s most pressing problems: the crippling cost of labor. Corridor, located in San Francisco’s Mid-Market neighborhood, where high-profile closures are frequent (local hot spots Cadence and Oro are two such casualties), was created with this high mortality rate in mind. Think of it as fine-dining CPR: You retain the high quality of food and detail-driven level of hospitality but ditch formality for counter service. While hard data has not yet been collected, Kevin Dugan of the New York State Restaurant Association says fast fine is growing “in large part because these types of establishments often have a lower overhead when it comes to labor costs. These rising costs are forcing many restaurants to begin looking at nontraditional concepts, like fine-dining counter service, to ensure that they can maintain profitability. I would expect this trend to continue.”

fast fine
At the server-less Corridor, a GPS tracker is given to customers after they order at a counter. (Photo: Andrea Strong.)

Restaurateurs agree. “The fine-dining business model is fundamentally flawed,” says Charles Bililies, who worked for Thomas Keller and Michael Mina before opening Souvla, a fast-fine Greek restaurant featuring spit-roasted meats, in 2014. It now has three locations in San Francisco. “There are so many expenses that are part of delivering that fine-dining experience. Even at a high price point, it is challenging to operate successfully.” Bililies’s solution was to cut out the labor and move to a counter-service model. Like Corridor, you place your order with a counter person who greets you and acts very much like a server, answering any questions about the menu or allergies and the like. You take a table number (they don’t use the cool GPS tracker at Souvla), find a seat and your meal arrives by food runner. When you’re done, your tables are bussed. If you’d like water, there is a self-service station.

“We are not eliminating the whole service aspect; we are just mitigating it.”

The benefits of the waiterless model are game changing: Labor costs are slashed significantly. Corridor partner Ryan Cole estimates that he uses two to three less people per service, a significant savings, in particular for the San Francisco model where operators are not afforded a tip credit for front-of-house employees. (Under federal law and in most states, employers may pay tipped employees less than the minimum wage, as long as employees receive enough in tips to make up the difference. San Francisco, however, does not offer employers a tip credit, so tipped employees get full wages plus tips. It’s a significant issue for operators in this state.) Souvla’s Bililies has seen similar savings. “Most full-service restaurants are working with 30 to 40 percent labor cost,” he says. “Ours are considerably lower than that.”

fast fine
Although Souvla embraces the serverless aspect of fast casual, the restaurant is designed to feel like a fine-dining establishment. (Photo courtesy of Souvla.)

While the formula requires cuts in labor and service, this hybrid model retains the touch points of a fine-dining restaurant. Walk into Souvla and you could be in a charming taverna on the Santorini coast. The restaurant is lined with glossy white subway tiles and decorated with copper and brass artifacts from Bililies’s travels. There are grand installations of olive trees and bay leaves, and tables are set with stunning enamelware and real wine and beer glasses. The restaurant feels special. For Bililies, the litmus test was this: Is the restaurant nice enough to bring a date to? “It’s a simple question, but it’s fairly profound in terms of how we approach our operation,” he says. “We spent a lot of time and money building a beautiful restaurant where you can pop in and have a fast lunch in a bright, high-energy setting and yet have it transform into a restaurant that feels intimate and like a full-service restaurant when the lights are down and candles are lit on the table.”

Similar goals are at work at San Francisco’s soon-to-open RT Rotisserie from Rich Table’s Sarah and Evan Rich. Here, guests order a choice of rotisserie-cooked chicken, pork or cauliflower, along with wine or beer at the counter, take a table number and sit down to a table set with real dishes, silverware and glassware. Bottles of tap water and glasses are given out when you order, and someone walks around pouring water occasionally as well. The food is brought out by food runners, and staff walk through the dining room with an iPad using a system called Toast for folks who’d like to order additional wine or desserts. Bussers also clear the tables. “We are not eliminating the whole service aspect; we are just mitigating it. But we still want to embrace that tone of being taken care of. I see fast fine as a nice restaurant where you just happen to order at the counter,” says Evan Rich.

“Counter service is a low-pressure, low-commitment model.”

The adaptability of the model to all meal periods also adds to the financial success of fast fine. These restaurants stay open all day, most from 11 a.m. through as late as 10 p.m., and can capture diners who eat at off hours. They also benefit from delivery and takeout business, a boon to the bottom line. “This is the way that the consumer wants to dine: They want quality, they want efficiency and flexibility in terms of the when and where and being able to eat at any time of the day, not just at traditional mealtimes,” says Bililies. “We can be many things to many people and check the box for every dining need.”

Marko Sotto, the owner of San Francisco’s Barzotto, which opened in August 2016, also decided to go the fast-fine route because of the push and pull between the incredibly high cost of labor and the desire to hold on to the hallmarks of “fine” dining. At Barzotto, guests order at the counter, are given a GPS device and are served at the table. Staff bus the tables, but the restaurant does not have floor staff offering to refill your wine and beer or add on food items like Corridor does, which he admits may not be for everyone. “This may not be your go-to place for a Friday night out with your parents,” he says. “Some people are put off by the speed that the food comes out. And they might not want to get back in line for a second glass of wine.”

For the most part, Sotto sees a willing customer base. “There is a good market for this type of concept in San Francisco, which is fueled by the tech industry and heavy on young people on the run who appreciate quality, value, atmosphere and hospitality outside of traditional restaurants. Counter service is a low-pressure, low-commitment model. You are in and out and easy and you get a great plate of food and can go on with your day.”

Which brings us to the other reason fast fine is becoming so popular: The concept is wildly appealing to a set of diners, some millennial and some not, who are looking to go out but are not willing to sit for hours and pay more than $100 for a dinner for two. “Most people don’t want to stop what they are doing and sit down and eat for two hours and be at the mercy of a server who might not want to bring the check or the wine when you want it,” says Nation’s Restaurant News senior food and beverage editor Bret Thorn. “They don’t want the ceremony of it anymore. They want more control over their experience.”

The other upside of fast fine is that since operators’ costs are kept down, your meal will be considerably more affordable. At Souvla, for instance, you can get a meal for two with wine for less than $50, which would be nearly impossible in a full-service setting. “So many operators are being forced to charge exorbitant prices, over $24 to $25 for a bowl of pasta,” says Cole, who offers pastas at Corridor ranging from $10 (with tomato and ricotta and lemon zest) to $17 (braised beef on pappardelle with rosemary and crimini mushrooms). “There is a breaking point where as good as the pasta is, the guest questions that value. They can’t pay that and feel okay about it. This concept has allowed us to keep our pricing down.”

Fast-fine restaurants also eliminate or lessen the need for tipping, which goes a long way to a more equitable distribution of income between front and back of the house and also helps ensure repeat business. “We’ve heard Danny Meyer talk to death about how the economic model of the restaurant is broken,” says Thorn. “Servers make a lot of money, and those tips cannot be shared with back of the house, which means 20 percent of the revenues of a restaurant cannot be distributed to back of house, where there is a labor shortage. By eliminating tipping you are able to have customers come in more often because they spend less money per visit and all that money can be more equitably distributed by management to the back of house.”

The other boon to operators: exceeding expectations. “Expectations are lower in a fast setting where you order at the counter,” says Rich Table’s Sarah Rich. “People don’t expect tables to be cleared, or glasses of wine to be refreshed, so you are able to surpass those expectations. We always want to underpromise and overdeliver, so the simplicity of the concept and the idea eliminates some of the struggles,” she says.

The fast-fine model is so compelling that some fast casual operators are even tweaking their concepts, turning them up a notch to the right on the service scale. Adam Eskin, founder and CEO of Dig Inn, the fast-casual, scratch-cooking restaurant chain that opened in 2011, says his restaurants will undergo slight changes in the coming months. New Dig Inns will have a more modern design with improved acoustics and attention to playlists and added elements of hospitality, including staff-to-bus tables, food served in ceramic bowls with proper forks, knives and stemware, and a beer and wine and full alcohol license. While Eskin is stopping short of adding waitstaff, he does plan to involve chefs in creating specials. The soon-to-open restaurant in Rye Brook, New York, will also feature a chef’s counter with brunch and dinner service and a tasting menu at that counter.

Since fast fine is so new, operators say it’s essential to keep things fluid. Figuring out whether you have service staff on the floor or whether you should have people return to the line for another glass of wine? It’s all a process. Possibly for diners, too, who will figure out how or how often the fast-fine model fits into their lifestyle. But it’s a learning curve that many will gladly climb to find a way to save an industry that’s struggling to find a way forward. “It is so much more difficult to run full-service restaurants on those tight margins,” says Cole. “Knowing just how much you can save with labor? This is the direction that restaurants are going.”

The post The Way To Save The Restaurant Industry? Put The Fast In Fine Dining. appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/23/save-restaurant-industry-fast-fine/feed/ 0
Healthy Spices, Diets, Tamagoyaki: 10 Hot Topics On Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/spices-diets-tamagoyaki-hot-topics/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/spices-diets-tamagoyaki-hot-topics/#respond Fri, 20 Jan 2017 19:00:20 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=163987 We were all about learning from chefs this week. From their fitness routines to their mentors, we found out what NYC’s George Mendes does after running a marathon and where Greg Baxtrom gets his inspiration for his standout Brooklyn restaurant, Olmsted. We also tried out some diets — quite the full spectrum of them, in […]

The post Healthy Spices, Diets, Tamagoyaki: 10 Hot Topics On Food Republic appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
We were all about learning from chefs this week. From their fitness routines to their mentors, we found out what NYC’s George Mendes does after running a marathon and where Greg Baxtrom gets his inspiration for his standout Brooklyn restaurant, Olmsted. We also tried out some diets — quite the full spectrum of them, in fact — and found the healthiest spices you should keep in your pantry. All that and more in this week’s Hot Topics.

  1. Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto shows us mastering tamagoyaki isn’t hard.
  2. You can lose weight while eating whatever you want. Believe it!
  3. This Boston chef stays fit by powerlifting and sticking to a wellness routine.
  4. North Korean refugees try American BBQ for the first time in this video.
  5. The Louisiana craft beer scene is booming! Here’s a guide.
  6. These are the healthiest spices out there. Stock your pantry now.
  7. A butcher and chef gave our Instagram followers a tour of their pork-filled shop.
  8. This New York chef runs marathons, then caters the after-parties.
  9. The James Beard Awards may be in Chicago, but the Jean Banchet Awards still run the city.
  10. In our latest episode of New Chefs Rising, we visit Greg Baxtrom’s Olmsted in Brooklyn, where he tells us about being mentored by Chicago’s Greg Achatz and more.

The post Healthy Spices, Diets, Tamagoyaki: 10 Hot Topics On Food Republic appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/spices-diets-tamagoyaki-hot-topics/feed/ 0
Healthy-ish Cocktails: Turmeric Takes Over In 2017 http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/healthy-ish-cocktails-turmeric-takes-over-in-2017/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/healthy-ish-cocktails-turmeric-takes-over-in-2017/#respond Fri, 20 Jan 2017 18:00:33 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=164033 There aren’t many (any?) cocktails that can truly be considered health-conscious. Sugar often prevails, no matter the drink, but that does not mean the vitamins or antiseptic properties found in a drink’s ingredients aren’t important. Ginger is probably the most curative ingredient found in traditional cocktails, and now its cousin turmeric happens to be one of the […]

The post Healthy-ish Cocktails: Turmeric Takes Over In 2017 appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
There aren’t many (any?) cocktails that can truly be considered health-conscious. Sugar often prevails, no matter the drink, but that does not mean the vitamins or antiseptic properties found in a drink’s ingredients aren’t important. Ginger is probably the most curative ingredient found in traditional cocktails, and now its cousin turmeric happens to be one of the latest ingredients showing up in many restaurants and bar programs.

When Robert Ceraso and Jason Mendenhall opened the health-focused restaurant the Wild Son in NYC’s Meatpacking District, they initially served just an array of nonalcoholic juice blends at the bar in lieu of cocktails. Adding alcohol to these juices came months later. “The turmeric-mango shrub itself started as a nonalcoholic healthy tonic on our daytime menu. We liked it so much that we wanted to integrate it into the cocktail program,” notes Ceraso. “The Golden Shrub was one of our first cocktails.”

There is nothing shy about this drink, which is what makes it delicious. With the intensity of amaro, a dose of turmeric hits the tongue like bitter sand, only to be quenched by a mango-citrus tang. In wine, that sandpaper dryness often refers to the sensation of tannins, which, opposite fruit and other aromas, can be a very desirable experience. It’s rare to feel that in a bright, lemony cocktail, but the organic nature of this sensation in the Golden Shrub does contribute to the drink’s restorative feel. Cocchi, a low-ABV aromatized wine, and Cappelletti, a bitter amaro, largely fade into the background while adding just the right herbaceous balance.

A known remedy and anti-inflammatory, turmeric has long been used in India for combatting illness, akin to the way moms might prescribe hot ginger, lemon and honey for colds. With its bright yellow cover, distinctive flavor and health appeal, it’s also set to be a recognizable facet of many cocktails to come. Enjoy.

Golden Shrub

Servings: 1 drink

Ingredients
1 1/2 ounces Cocchi Americano
1 1/2 ounces Cappelletti or Aperol
2 ounces mango-turmeric shrub*
1 ounce fresh lemon juice
1/2 ounce agave or simple syrup (1:1)

Directions:

*For the mango-turmeric shrub

  1. Combine 1 part fresh juice of turmeric root, 1 part Bragg Organic apple cider, and 3 parts fresh mango nectar.
    2. Mix well and store for future use. The mixture will last refrigerated for approximately 7 days.

For assembly: 

  1. Combine ingredients in a cocktail shaker and add ice.
  2. Shake vigorously for 10 seconds and strain into a chilled coupe.
  3. Garnish with an orange twist.

Prep time: 2 minutes
Difficulty: Moderate

The post Healthy-ish Cocktails: Turmeric Takes Over In 2017 appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/healthy-ish-cocktails-turmeric-takes-over-in-2017/feed/ 0
Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen Talk Cooking Habits, Garlic In Podcast http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/carrie-brownstein-fred-armisen-talk-cooking-habits/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/carrie-brownstein-fred-armisen-talk-cooking-habits/#respond Fri, 20 Jan 2017 16:00:01 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=163992 In the latest episode of the Talkhouse podcast, actors and musicians Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen chat about their cooking habits before and after starting their IFC show, Portlandia, and niche cooking trends. Both Armisen and Brownstein say they have attempted the home cook lifestyle, but because of their work schedules, neither entertains the idea much. Armisen confesses that he doesn’t […]

The post Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen Talk Cooking Habits, Garlic In Podcast appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
In the latest episode of the Talkhouse podcast, actors and musicians Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen chat about their cooking habits before and after starting their IFC show, Portlandia, and niche cooking trends.

Both Armisen and Brownstein say they have attempted the home cook lifestyle, but because of their work schedules, neither entertains the idea much. Armisen confesses that he doesn’t like to cook and in fact doesn’t “like seeing pieces of vegetables [in the kitchen].” The only thing he will cook, however, is breakfast.

Garlic comes up in conversation as a mythical cure-all that they’ve encountered in their social circles. Armisen mused that anyone who “fancied themselves a cook” would add some extra flair by adding extra garlic to whatever they were making. Meanwhile, Brownstein says that she’s been told sucking on a clove of garlic can ail a sickness and even that sticking a clove into a woman who had a yeast infection could remedy the itch.

Brownstein reminisces about her communal housing days, when she says the worst thing someone made in the shared kitchen was refried beans on bread. “I’d rather watch someone eat dog food,” she says. Also to her distaste, Brownstein compares television editing to making one’s own crackers.

The duo also talk about Armisen’s recent trip to Tokyo, performing live, comedy, Wikipedia and more.

Check out the episode below. 

The post Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen Talk Cooking Habits, Garlic In Podcast appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/carrie-brownstein-fred-armisen-talk-cooking-habits/feed/ 0
How To Pick The Best Oysters http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/163949/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/163949/#respond Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:00:30 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=163949 Think of oysters as the bivalve equivalent of the little girl in Longfellow’s poem — when they are good, they are very, very good. And when they are bad, they are horrid. But if fear of a bad one has kept your bivalve yen at bay, well, then this is your lucky day. Because when […]

The post How To Pick The Best Oysters appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
picking oysters
There is a step-by-step process involved in picking oysters.

Think of oysters as the bivalve equivalent of the little girl in Longfellow’s poem — when they are good, they are very, very good. And when they are bad, they are horrid. But if fear of a bad one has kept your bivalve yen at bay, well, then this is your lucky day. Because when you know what to look for, you are almost guaranteed to avoid any half-shell horrors. To that end, our friends at ChefSteps have enlisted Marco Pinchot — a true mollusk master — to show us everything we need to know about picking oysters. He’s an expert on sustainability at Taylor Shellfish Farms, the world-renowned shellfish cultivator based in Washington state.

Pinchot’s lessons are not the sole purview of hard-core foraging types — these tips will come in handy whether you’re perched at the raw bar, shopping at the farmers’ market or dragging a shovel along a rocky stretch of Puget Sound sand. So go ahead and school yourself on picking oysters — your newfound knowledge is sure to pay off over a lifetime of superior slurping. Take a look at the instructional video and tips below.

Picking oysters

picking oysters

1. Identify the flat side. Every oyster has a flat shell and a rounded one. When you are shucking an oyster, you want this flat side to face upward. It is also always better to store your oysters with the flat sides facing up. Examine the shell for any chips or broken bits. You want a shell that is closed and entirely intact. Now is also a good time to notice whether the shell is sealed. If you see cracks where the two sides of the shell meet, move on to the next oyster.

picking oysters

2. Check out the cup. Depending on the species, the growing method and the environment, the rounded shell — or cup — of an oyster might be very deep or more shallow. An oyster with a deep cup will have a nice amount of meat inside. As with the flat side, look out for cracks and broken bits. And if you see them, don’t eat that oyster.

picking oysters

3. Listen. Hold the oyster close to your ear and knock on it. Do you hear a hollow sound? That indicates an oyster that is dehydrated. You don’t want that one.

picking oysters

4. Examine the meat. Once you’ve shucked the oyster, have a look inside. What we want to see here is meat that reaches almost to the edge of the shell and feels firm when you poke it with your knife. Good oyster meat is plump and solid in color. If it looks spawny — translucent or milky — say sayonara.

Note: You can also use this opportunity to smell the oyster if you like. Good oysters smell a little sweet and a lot like the sea. If for any reason the odor gives you pause, well, you know what to do.

picking oysters

5. Look for liquor. The liquid in an oyster shell, lovingly known as the liquor, carries a lot of the delicacy’s flavor. If the shell was properly sealed when you shucked it, the oyster should have ample liquor inside. If it doesn’t, throw it away.

ChefSteps comprises a team of award-winning chefs, filmmakers, scientists, designers and engineers focused on revolutionizing the way people cook by inspiring creativity and encouraging expertise in the kitchen. You can also get access to all of ChefSteps’ Premium content — including paid classes and dozens of recipes available only to Premium members for a onetime fee — for the special price of $24 (regularly $39). Classes include Sous Vide: Beyond the BasicsFluid GelsFrench Macarons and more!

The post How To Pick The Best Oysters appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/163949/feed/ 0
What’s Driving Up The Price Of Food At Colleges? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/price-food-college/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/price-food-college/#respond Fri, 20 Jan 2017 14:00:48 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=163902 The cost of university dining-hall meal plans has risen by 47 percent since 2007. What’s driving up the price of food at college? As facilities respond to the demand for a substantial increase in the quality and variety of food, some students find themselves in financial straits. Often required as a condition of on-campus residence, meal plans […]

The post What’s Driving Up The Price Of Food At Colleges? appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
The cost of university dining-hall meal plans has risen by 47 percent since 2007. What’s driving up the price of food at college? As facilities respond to the demand for a substantial increase in the quality and variety of food, some students find themselves in financial straits. Often required as a condition of on-campus residence, meal plans are steadily crawling toward being prohibitively expensive.

(@wellesleyfresh/Insta)
Pear carpaccio served with golden raisins and tangy spinach salad at a Wellesley College dining hall. (Photo: @wellesleyfresh/Instagram.) 

According to a report by Time, some campuses take this trend to the extreme, which comes as a detriment to those who can’t afford premium cafeteria food. At Wellesley College, for example, one day’s menu might offer spaghetti squash with pesto and pine nuts, cinnamon beef tagine and Niman Ranch ham from a carving station, or an international dumpling dinner featuring 16 options.

Acquiring a taste for new, healthy foods is key to developing good eating habits, and one might argue that meal plans allow students to maximize their studying time. But let’s be real: Learning to buy groceries and cook in an under-equipped space on a budget is as valuable a skill as any. Instead, the demand — largely from those not receiving financial assistance — for a restaurant-quality selection has pushed the price of the average American college meal plan up to $22 per day. The cost for sous vide circulators, wood-fired pizza ovens and specialized labor is passed down to all students, regardless of their expectations for on-campus food.

For those with hefty loans and limited discretionary funds, impractical dining options serve as a reminder of the wide gap between college students from the top-earning families in America and those from the bottom 60 percent.

The post What’s Driving Up The Price Of Food At Colleges? appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/20/price-food-college/feed/ 0
Hit The Road: 12 Portable, High-Energy Snacks http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/19/12-high-energy-snacks/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/19/12-high-energy-snacks/#respond Thu, 19 Jan 2017 18:00:20 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=163859 This weekend will see a lot of people gathering in peaceful protest for…well, for obvious reasons. If you’re hitting the streets, don’t go empty-handed: Bring along a hearty stash of these high-energy snacks to keep you and your friends well-fueled. This selection of nutrient-dense fodder is especially portable, easily packed in zip-top bags or foil, […]

The post Hit The Road: 12 Portable, High-Energy Snacks appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
This weekend will see a lot of people gathering in peaceful protest for…well, for obvious reasons. If you’re hitting the streets, don’t go empty-handed: Bring along a hearty stash of these high-energy snacks to keep you and your friends well-fueled. This selection of nutrient-dense fodder is especially portable, easily packed in zip-top bags or foil, and, like all of us, not easily crushed.

Recipe: Roasted Red Pepper Focaccia With Goat Cheese

The secret to my chewy, airy, hearty focaccia lies in the addition of whole-wheat flour in the dough. Whole wheat contains wheat germ and bran, lending a deeper, more complex flavor and structure to the dough, and when paired with softer all-purpose flour, the baked texture of this Italian classic is the perfect combination of airy and hearty.

Ginger Cranberry Cookies
These ginger cranberry cookies are a sweet, zingy treat perfect for the holidays.

Recipe: Ginger Cranberry Cookies

Substitute another dried fruit if you don’t have dried cranberries on hand.

jerk-spiced cashews recipe
Let’s hear it for this hot jerk-spiced cashews recipe!

Recipe: Jerk-Spiced Cashews 

We like to lean toward simplicity and clean flavors. So every time we start a jerk dish with a blank canvas, it’s always a riot how long the list of ingredients grows. The point is that jerk is a very complex blend of spices that must work in a perfect harmony of herbal, sweet, spicy and sour. It takes many parts to complete the whole, and nothing can be out of sync. These cashews have made many appearances on our menus over the years but most recently played a great supporting role alongside our jerk trumpet mushrooms. They are terrific on top of a salad or just for snacking.

tahini fudge recipe
This tahini fudge recipe will replace any other blender recipe you may have up your sleeve.

Recipe: Tahini Fudge

Tahini fudge sounds like a dessert you spent tons of cash on and tons of time hunting down ingredients. But this is super-easy and comes together in the blender, but we won’t tell. Impress the hell out of your friends while staying true to your lazy roots.

onigiri
These happy little breakfast balls will revolutionize your bacon and eggs.

Recipe: Bacon And Scrambled Egg Onigiri

This onigiri is a little fatty from the eggs scrambled in butter and the bacon. If you like, you can hold it all together by wrapping it like an envelope.

matchabark
Give this homemade white chocolate matcha bark as a gift (or keep it all for yourself!). (Photo: Patrycia Lukas.)

Recipe: Superfood Matcha White Chocolate Bark

Chocolate bark is probably one of my favorite edible homemade gifts. It’s so simple to make that even a child can do it, and the possibilities for flavors and toppings are endless. You can add dried fruit, nuts, seeds, your favorite cookies or candy, herbs, salt or chili powder. I would, however, recommend using a good-quality eating chocolate, as it’s all about the chocolate.

(Photo: Kris Lindenmuth)
What to do with too much zucchini? Break out the loaf pan and buttering knife! (Photo: Kris Lindenmuth)

Recipe: Easy Homemade Zucchini Bread

If you have one super-simple baking recipe in your arsenal, make it banana bread. If you have two, make sure the second one is zucchini bread. While grating zucchini takes slightly longer than peeling overripe bananas, the resulting treat is well worth the effort. That’s right, zucchini dresses sweet or savory, and if you’ve never had it sweet, this is the definitive recipe.

scallionbread
Pull one of those steaming scallion rolls from the pan and savor the scent!

Recipe: Scallion Pull-Apart Bread

Food writer Kristin Donnelly’s new cookbook brings back the old-school potluck dinner with contemporary new recipes. Just because it has to be portable, universally pleasing and easy enough to make in large batches doesn’t mean you’re stuck with beige casseroles and boring side dishes. Pick up a copy of Modern Potluck and feed that crowd right!

lentils
These smoky, crunchy fried lentils can liven up soups and salads or simply be your new favorite high-protein snack.

Recipe: Fried Spiced Red Lentils

The editors of Food & Wine magazine have a cookbook out that will bring new life to your pantry and give your favorite kitchen staples a much-needed makeover. Take 50 popular ingredients and transform them into 200 easy-to-make recipes for everyone at your table.

fruitleather
Make your own fruit leather using frozen fruit any time of the year — it’s the best lunchbox dessert you’ve ever made!

Recipe: Peach-Raspberry Swirl Fruit Leather

Tip: Convection baking is really the best way to make fruit leather, but if your oven doesn’t have a convection setting, bake the leather on the standard setting at the same temperature. It will just take a bit longer.

chips
Potato chips called. They don’t want to be vegetarian anymore.

Recipe: Salami Chips

This dish was discovered at one of the pop-up food markets we frequent in New York City. One cold weekday evening, when business was slow, our neighbors across the aisle, La Sonrisa Empanadas, motioned to us for a few thin slices of salami. In accordance with our unwritten understanding that we keep each other fed during the long market hours, we obliged. A few minutes later, we received a surprise treat. Ariel, the empanada master, had taken our slices and dropped then in the fryer. The result was salami chips — a delicious snack, appetizer, and a powerful creator of texture in a wide range of main dishes.

CC_ProphecyxFoodRepublic_Crunchy-Truffled-Chickpeas-2

Recipe: Crunchy Truffled Chickpeas 

These truffled chickpeas can be batch roasted, stored in an airtight container and poured into a bowl at a moment’s notice when those unexpected neighbors pop over to say hello.

The post Hit The Road: 12 Portable, High-Energy Snacks appeared first on Food Republic.

]]>
http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/01/19/12-high-energy-snacks/feed/ 0