Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com Where Food, Drink & Culture Unite Wed, 26 Apr 2017 21:13:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 Here Are 8 NYC Dining Ideas For This Spring http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/26/dining-ideas-spring/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/26/dining-ideas-spring/#respond Wed, 26 Apr 2017 15:00:45 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168752 Spring has sprung here in New York City! Or has it? With the weather prone to playing games with us over the past few weeks, we’ve alternated between drinking outdoors at beer gardens and ordering delivery food with the heat on at home. That being said, it’s only a matter of time before warmer temperatures […]

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Spring has sprung here in New York City! Or has it? With the weather prone to playing games with us over the past few weeks, we’ve alternated between drinking outdoors at beer gardens and ordering delivery food with the heat on at home. That being said, it’s only a matter of time before warmer temperatures kick in for the next few months and we can shed the outerwear and pants for tees and shorts while popping rosé. Okay, so perhaps we got a little carried away on that last one, but here are eight ideas — restaurants, dishes, drinks and more — to explore in the Big Apple to welcome in the new season.

1. Go for the art, stay for the food
Long gone are the days when a spring afternoon spent browsing New York City’s finest museums meant subsequently searching for an adequate restaurant in the area. After making your way through rotating exhibits, check out the seasonal menus at Danny Meyer’s Untitled and The Modern, located at the Whitney Museum and MoMA, respectively. The dining room at Robert pays homage to its location on the top floor of Museum of Arts & Design in Columbus Circle, while a jaunt uptown to the Met Breuer should end (or begin) with a meal at Flora Bar. Headed to the Gagosian Gallery? Stop by Kappo Masa for a power lunch (or dinner, for that matter). Taking on the Brooklyn Museum? Be sure to nosh at The Norm. And we didn’t even mention upcoming art fairs, such as Frieze, which are known to bring out premier culinary talent.

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Slow-roasted pork shoulder, warm grains, carrots, bacon, kale and pickled carrots at Made Nice.

2. Pop into a big-name chef spot…without breaking the bank
Eleven Madison Park was recently voted the world’s best restaurant. Cosme checked in on the same list at number 40. What do the chefs of these extravagant restaurants — Daniel Humm and Enrique Olvera — have in common, apart from extraordinary culinary prowess and limitless creativity? They’re each behind new fast-casual concepts in the city with check averages under $20. Humm’s Made Nice and Olvera’s Atla are decidedly different from their original masterpieces, all while pandering to today’s trends of inexpensive, high-quality food served in an efficient manner.

3. Eat your veggies; work on that summer body
It’s never been a better time for vegetable-focused cooking in the city. Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s abcV is currently the hottest table in town, while John Fraser’s Nix picked up a Michelin star in its first year of eligibility and Rouge Tomate re-opened in new digs at the end of last year to high praise. Brooks Headley is still slinging veggie delights at a James Beard-nominated hole-in-the-wall, Superiority Burger, in the East Village and almost every new restaurant menu features multiple vegetarian entrées. It’s good to be green these days.

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Can you think of a more enjoyable way to spend a Saturday than drinking aboard this vessel? We think not.

4. Go drink at a beer garden! Or on top of a roof! Or on a boat!
Beer gardens: Where to begin? It’s difficult to think of a less more productive way to waste spend a gorgeous spring day than nursing cold brews outdoors among friends? Don’t look to us to be the first to let you know about any secretive, sparkling new establishments where you won’t spend half the day waiting in line — we’re just not that cool (and wouldn’t want to blow up a spot this early in the game!) Instead, start your day — and drinking — extra early, and beat the crowds to perennial favorites The Frying Pan, Mr. Purple, 230 Fifth, Birreria and Radegast Hall & Biergarten. You’re sure to find different crowds and vibes at all of them.

6. Bleecker Street pizza run
It’s possible to get a taste of some of the city’s best slices and pies without walking more than just a few blocks (a pizza connoisseur’s dream, after all). Bleecker Street Pizza, John’s of Bleecker Street and Joe’s Pizza are located within a stone’s throw of one another. Why not seize a beautiful spring day away and try out all three of them? Just beware before declaring one superior to another: The only thing testier than an NYC pizza snob is an NYC pizza snob with undying loyalty to a single joint.

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A piece of o-toro (fatty tuna) at Sushi Katsuei.

6. Treat yourself to some affordable omakase
We’ve covered the omakase craze sweeping the Big Apple over the past few months — people are more willing than ever to spend hundreds of dollars on chef-chosen raw-fish meals at minimalistic venues that might have you out of the door in less than an hour. But recent openings have offered hope for those seeking a similar experience at a lower price-point. Brooklyn darling Sushi Katsuei opened its first Manhattan Branch, in the West Village, while Los Angeles original (and favorite of all millennials, everywhere) Sugarfish now boasts Manhattan locations of both the original restaurant and hand-roll spinoff KazuNori. The open-aired Sushi on Jones inside Bowery Market slings out a reasonably priced omakase and its brainchild, chef David Bouhadana (of Sushi Dojo and glove-gate fame) is planning to open his own spot in the near future. Who ever said omakase translated to “bank-busting”?

7. Get your Keith McNally on
Few individuals have done more for the food scene in New York City over the past decades than Keith McNally. His flagship Balthazar continues to pack tables day-in and night-out, having just celebrated its 20-year anniversary (that’s equivalent, some might say, to 100 human years). Good luck finding a primetime table at his storied Minetta Tavern, which still dishes out one of the city’s most formidable burgers. Just a few years after opening the successful Cherche Midi, McNally is back at it again with Augustine — a bistro that causes New York Times critic Pete Wells to wax poetic about how it, “evokes Vintage Paris.”

8. Slurp up some bone broth
Sure, we included this one back on our list of food-based adventures to tackle in February, but it’s still relevant, as the weather really does refuse to warm up for good this spring. There’s no better way to beat the unseasonably cool weather than by slurping up essential nutrients. Hearth’s Marco Canora is rightfully credited with making the liquid elixir a “thing” by opening takeout-window Brodo, which has since expanded to a second location. Apart from the originals, check out Springbone Kitchen and Barneys Bone Broth.

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What Is A French Taco? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/26/french-taco/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/26/french-taco/#respond Wed, 26 Apr 2017 14:00:17 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168747 We thought we knew everything there was to know about tacos. Until we heard about the French taco. This is the signature creation of French chain O’Tacos, which opened its first location in American in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights neighborhood. Less like a taco and more like a pressed San Diego-style burrito, the French taco is stuffed […]

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We thought we knew everything there was to know about tacos. Until we heard about the French taco.

This is the signature creation of French chain O’Tacos, which opened its first location in American in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights neighborhood.

Less like a taco and more like a pressed San Diego-style burrito, the French taco is stuffed with fries, a white creamy cheese sauce, a protein (choices include grilled chicken breast, nuggets, tenders, ground beef or sausage), an additional sauce (mustard, Tabasco, ketchup, mayonnaise, barbecue) and other ingredients (cheese, mushrooms, grilled veggies, an egg, bacon, ham and more) all wrapped up in a flour tortilla.

A French taco is pressed with a griddle. (Photo: O'Tacos/Facebook.)
A French taco is pressed with a griddle. (Photo: O’Tacos/Facebook.)

The tacos come in four sizes: medium, large, extra large and extra, extra large with the biggest taco measuring the length of a child’s arm. The bigger the taco, the more proteins and tortillas come into play.

What makes this a French taco, or even a taco for that matter? At O’Tacos, it helps to have a laissez-faire attitude about taxonomy. But lest you think this is the latest effort to create a fad, know this: O’Tacos is such a hit in France, there are over 100 locations in that country alone.

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8 New Ways To Make Scrambled Eggs http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/26/new-ways-to-make-scrambled-eggs/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/26/new-ways-to-make-scrambled-eggs/#respond Wed, 26 Apr 2017 13:00:55 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168725 Chances are, this humble, delicious dish was one of the first things you ever learned how to cook (and perhaps when to add cheese to that dish was second). Nearly every food culture has a special place in its collective menu for scrambled eggs, and we’ve gathered up some of our favorites from the very […]

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Chances are, this humble, delicious dish was one of the first things you ever learned how to cook (and perhaps when to add cheese to that dish was second). Nearly every food culture has a special place in its collective menu for scrambled eggs, and we’ve gathered up some of our favorites from the very simple to the completely and utterly decked out. Hey, nobody said a humble dish couldn’t dress up and go to the ball. Pick up a dozen free-range beauties and check out eight new ways to make scrambled eggs.

Recipe: Multigrain Polenta With Pesto Eggs

Make the polenta on Sunday, and you can enjoy it all week long. A quick scramble of pesto-laced eggs and some seared vegetables will get your day off to a seriously well-fed start. The polenta can be a great swap for grains in other bowls, too, and these toppings work just as well with amaranth or teff.

This recipe takes a little work, but it's well worth the egg-fort. (Photo: Jacqui Melville.)
This recipe takes a little work, but it’s well worth the egg-fort. (Photo: Jacqui Melville.)

Recipe: Scrambled Eggs With Truffles

To make the most of the delicious flavor of the truffles, you need to be a bit organized and put the eggs and truffles in the fridge together overnight, to allow the flavors to permeate the eggs. Serve the eggs in the eggshells, but if you have trouble keeping the shells intact, simply use eggcups or ramekins instead.

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Want to switch up your scrambled egg game? Look to India for inspiration.

Recipe: Akoori (Indian Scrambled Eggs)

Indian-style scrambled eggs, known as akoori, are a weekend brunch staple at the Kapadia house, served hot out of the pan over slices of buttered, toasted baguette. I’ve had scrambled eggs with chives, caviar, cubes of ham, smoked salmon, shredded cheddar and, my favorite, lobster. (Not all at once, of course.) I’ve had them barely-set (France) and nearly-rubber (weird morning after). I’ve made a foolproof version in the Food Republic test kitchen. But akoori tops them all. Why? They’re spicy from the chilies, herbal from the cilantro and earthy from the cumin. And as far as what to serve over toast on the weekend goes, it simply can’t be beat.

Nobu's Scrambled Egg Donburi Recipe

Recipe: Nobu’s Scrambled Egg Donburi

Master chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s signature is keeping it simple: if you’ve ever had the pleasure of that miso-glazed black cod, you know what we’re talking about. His Scrambled Egg Donburi, a a protein-rich combination of scrambled eggs and salmon over rice, might just be the perfect breakfast.

(Photo: Clare Barboza.)
(Photo: Clare Barboza.)

Recipe: Greens And Grains Scramble

This is the breakfast Sam and I probably eat most often regardless of the season. In truth, it’s usually a dish we whip up as a late breakfast on weekdays when we’re both working from home and most emails have been returned. It’s wonderfully versatile and allows you to use up any leftover grains you have from previous meals, folding in leafy greens for a bit of color. In that sense, think of it more as a template rather than a hard-and-fast approach. Any leafy greens and most grains will work, although I veer away from small, delicate grains like amaranth because they can get lost in the dish.

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Crunchy fried flour tortillas, creamy eggs and avocado and a rich, savory homemade salsa. Can you say “brunch”? (Photo: Evan Sung.)

Recipe: Crispy Breakfast Tortilla Stacks

Those leftover flour tortillas languishing in the back of your fridge? Put them to work as the foundation of an easy, crisp-based breakfast dish. All you need is a cookie cutter and some frying oil to turn those ’tillas into flaky rounds that reveal wavy, puffy layers when fried or baked. I add a homemade roasted salsa that comes together with the help of a sheet pan and food processor (or knife). I top with soft-scrambled eggs and avocado slices for an easy, totally inauthentic riff on the puffy tacos so many Texans are obsessed with.

Because, contrary to popular opinion, they won't scramble themselves.
Because, contrary to popular opinion, they won’t scramble themselves.Photo: Mark Shaw

Recipe: Perfect Scrambled Eggs

The only correct answer to “How do you like your eggs in the morning?” is “Scrambled, perfectly.” That having been definitively established, let’s move on to pulling it off, perfectly, every single time. Here is how to make perfect scrambled eggs.  Begin by heating a medium cast-iron or other heavy skillet over low heat.

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Photo: Jeff FriedStart your day off with the most luxurious scrambled eggs.

Recipe: Lobster Scrambled Eggs

This lobster scrambled eggs recipe comes from Chef David Burke, whose whimsical and dramatic take on modern American cuisine drew us to SoHo’s David Burke Kitchen, his newest venture. The key to this dish is using the best eggs you can find, free-range and fresh from the coop if possible (scope out the egg scene at your local farmers market). Very ripe summer tomatoes will also work wonders. Do that lobster justice.

roasted asparagus and scrambled eggs
Photo: Lisa McLaughlin

Recipe: Roasted Asparagus And Scrambled Eggs

There’s still a few weekends left in asparagus season, so this is the perfect time to try this easy and cheesy roasted asparagus and scrambled eggs recipe. Roasting asparagus gives it a deeper flavor and intensifies its natural affinity with eggs.

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These happy little breakfast balls will revolutionize your bacon and eggs.

Recipe: Bacon And Scrambled Egg Onigiri

This onigiri is a little fatty from the eggs scrambled in butter and the bacon. If you like, you can hold it all together by wrapping it like an envelope.

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Photo: Alexandra WinsbyDon’t stray away from the cactus paddle anymore.

Recipe: Egg And Cactus-Paddle Tacos

Cactus paddles: You’ve seen them at the grocery store and thought, “Hey, cactus paddles.” And that’s about it, right? Well, this incredibly delicious and decidedly unspiky ingredient, known as nopales in Mexico, where it’s eaten in a variety of preparations, is about to revolutionize the way you see breakfast tacos. Crisp, flavorful and succulent, cactus just needs a close shave and a parboil before it’s ready to join this Mexican-veggie scramble. Next time you see them at the market, you’ll know exactly what to do.

Nothing goes with soft scrambled eggs quite like crunchy fried oysters with a peppery kick.

Recipe: Bridgehampton Town Fry

Need a night out of town? Hit the road or train and head to The Topping Rose House in Bridgehampton, NY for an evening of salt water pools, a farm-to-table restaurant (try their pig roasts!) and a big, comfortable room stocked full of awesome local snacks. Itchin for a fishing excursion or baking lesson? They’ll hook you up. In the morning, head down for one of the best breakfasts in town, and don’t miss the Bridgehampton Town Fry, their play on the classic fried oyster scramble.

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Watch Zakary Pelaccio Discuss His New Book http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/watch-zakary-pelaccio-discuss-his-new-cookbook/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/watch-zakary-pelaccio-discuss-his-new-cookbook/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 18:00:44 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168693 Last night, Zakary Pelaccio and writer-photographer Peter Barrett visited Facebook headquarters in Los Angeles to discuss their new book Project 258: Making Dinner at Fish & Game, live on our Facebook page. The two, both past Food Republic contributors, talk food waste, fermentation and more Zeitgeist-y topics in their fireside chat. Pelaccio, the successful NYC chef who […]

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Last night, Zakary Pelaccio and writer-photographer Peter Barrett visited Facebook headquarters in Los Angeles to discuss their new book Project 258: Making Dinner at Fish & Game, live on our Facebook page. The two, both past Food Republic contributors, talk food waste, fermentation and more Zeitgeist-y topics in their fireside chat. Pelaccio, the successful NYC chef who decamped to Hudson, two hours north of Manhattan, also discusses his decision to quit the city for a simpler life. Check it out, and pick up a copy of Project 258 for recipes, stories, fermentation and preservation tips, as well as Barrett’s excellent photography, from the Hudson Valley.

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This Company Is Brewing Beer From Leftover Bread http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/brewing-beer-leftover-bread/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/brewing-beer-leftover-bread/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 17:00:19 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168671 Breadcrumbs, bread pudding, croutons, French toast — these are just a couple of things you can make with leftover bread. What about beer? Toast Ale, a British brewing company, has been making beer from leftover fresh loaves of bread in England for a year. The effort has already saved 7,000 pounds of bread from the […]

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Breadcrumbs, bread pudding, croutons, French toast — these are just a couple of things you can make with leftover bread. What about beer?

Toast Ale, a British brewing company, has been making beer from leftover fresh loaves of bread in England for a year. The effort has already saved 7,000 pounds of bread from the landfill. The company is now eyeing the States as its next project and launched a crowdfunding campaign to help make it happen.

The goal is not only to brew the beer in America, but to double the amount of bread saved. Better yet, 100% of the profits made will be donated to Feedback, a British charity dedicated to fighting food waste.

The beer makers were recently featured in WASTED! The Story Of Food Waste, a documentary about how the world wastes unseen tons of food every day (and how to combat it).

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Video: Why Are Certain Foods Spicier For Some People? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/certain-foods-spicier/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/certain-foods-spicier/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 15:00:07 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168682 Why is it that you cautiously dab Tabasco on your food for that hint of heat, but your friend over there can douse it in ghost pepper sauce and barely bat an eye? Is it true that people from spice-heavy locales like Mexico and India have a higher tolerance for the hot stuff? Why are […]

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Why is it that you cautiously dab Tabasco on your food for that hint of heat, but your friend over there can douse it in ghost pepper sauce and barely bat an eye? Is it true that people from spice-heavy locales like Mexico and India have a higher tolerance for the hot stuff? Why are certain foods spicier for some, and is there anything you can do about it? Check out the facts from the smart folks at YouTube channel SciShow, and the next time your dining companion experiences a wasabi-induced “nose-gasm,” offer some nice, refreshing chemistry knowledge.

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Party Night Smarts: What Is Spaghettata? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/italian-spaghettata/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/italian-spaghettata/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 14:00:11 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168652 When you come home hungry and still tipsy from a long night out, the last thing you’re going to do is whip up an elaborate meal for yourself and your friends. Chances are, you can toss together a bowl of pasta with whatever’s handy to soak up the excess, replenish spent electrolytes and help you achieve that […]

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When you come home hungry and still tipsy from a long night out, the last thing you’re going to do is whip up an elaborate meal for yourself and your friends. Chances are, you can toss together a bowl of pasta with whatever’s handy to soak up the excess, replenish spent electrolytes and help you achieve that special kind of drunk sleep. The Italians are one step ahead of you: they call it spaghettata. What is spaghettata? It’s the smartest tradition to ever put a party night to bed.

The recipe for spaghettata, formally known as “spaghettata di mezzanote” (midnight spaghetti) involves tomatoes, anchovies, red chili flakes, parsley and capers. Sound a lot like pasta puttanesca? Two things: You’re absolutely right, and the story behind puttanesca might not be the one you’ve heard before.

Here’s the best part of spaghettata: It doesn’t have to involve spaghetti, nor does it have to contain the traditional pantry haul listed above. This is about creating a tasty pasta dish in the little time you have before you pass out cold, and is just one more wonderful culinary contribution from Italy. Toss in breadcrumbs, roasted red peppers, pitted olives, canned seafood or beans. Top it with Parmesan and a fried egg. The point is to squeeze in just a few more delights before you hit the sack, as they do in Italia.

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How Ella Brennan Shaped New Orleans Dining To What It Is Today http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/ella-brennan-shaped-nola-dining/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/25/ella-brennan-shaped-nola-dining/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 13:00:47 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168635 Before Emeril Lagasse “BAM’d” his way into America’s living rooms, he was the 24-year-old chef at Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. The woman who saw him fit for the job was restaurateur Ella Brennan. Brennan and her family challenged New Orleans classics of the day like Arnaud’s and Antoine’s by opening opening their own eponymous restaurant. At […]

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Before Emeril Lagasse “BAM’d” his way into America’s living rooms, he was the 24-year-old chef at Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. The woman who saw him fit for the job was restaurateur Ella Brennan.

Brennan and her family challenged New Orleans classics of the day like Arnaud’s and Antoine’s by opening opening their own eponymous restaurant. At the tender age of 18, Brennan already played a heavy hand in making the business flourish, hanging out in the kitchens and making executive decisions and local headlines alike as the restauranteur girl wonder. She moved on from Brennan’s to open Commander’s Palace in 1974, where she brought Cajun food, jazz brunches and fine dining together. Brennan’s life is mapped out in the documentary film Ella Brennan: Commanding the Table, set to be released on Netflix on May 1.

Through death, divorce and Hurricane Katrina, Brennan and her family persevered, winning James Beard Awards for Outstanding Service (1993), Outstanding Restaurant (1996) and Best Chef: South (1999, 2013) for Commander’s Palace. Brennan even went on to be awarded the Beards’ Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

Big names in the restaurant industry like Danny Meyer, Julia Reed, Jeremiah Tower and more make appearances throughout the film.

Check out the trailer below.

Ella Brennan: Commanding the Table Trailer from Iwerks & Co. on Vimeo.

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Sacramento Composts Diners’ Restaurant Leftovers http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/24/sacramento-composts-leftovers/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/24/sacramento-composts-leftovers/#respond Mon, 24 Apr 2017 17:00:24 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168606 The Sacramento Bee reports the launch of WasteRight Sacramento, an initiative that seeks to redirect waste from restaurant diners’ plates to composting facilities and biofuel plants. The program, now required for restaurants that produce at least four cubic square feet of waste per week, is one of the ways the city is committed to reducing its landfill […]

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The Sacramento Bee reports the launch of WasteRight Sacramento, an initiative that seeks to redirect waste from restaurant diners’ plates to composting facilities and biofuel plants. The program, now required for restaurants that produce at least four cubic square feet of waste per week, is one of the ways the city is committed to reducing its landfill contribution 75% by 2025. By arranging regular pickups of organic scraps through city waste collectors, restaurants can significantly reduce the amount of trash destined for the dump, and help fortify the soil at local farms.

California creates 30 million tons of waste each year, more than 200,000 tons of which comes from the Sacramento area. California’s Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery estimates that 30% of that waste, which includes paper products and landscaping and grass clippings, can be diverted to process into compost, mulch and energy.

Sacramento joins San Francisco in large-scale organic waste management, but as far as efficiency goes, Seoul, Korea is still the gold standard.

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We Have A Ton Of Awesome Pork Recipes! http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/24/awesome-pork-recipes/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/24/awesome-pork-recipes/#respond Mon, 24 Apr 2017 15:00:08 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168602 Did you know that we have an absolute ton of pork recipes that need a new home in your kitchen? And we’ve got even more for our swine enthusiast friends: every kind of pork belly, handy butchering and sausage-stuffing techniques and in-depth guides about our favorite pig-centric dishes. Take a deep dive into our colorful Knife & Pork section […]

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Did you know that we have an absolute ton of pork recipes that need a new home in your kitchen? And we’ve got even more for our swine enthusiast friends: every kind of pork belly, handy butchering and sausage-stuffing techniques and in-depth guides about our favorite pig-centric dishes. Take a deep dive into our colorful Knife & Pork section for dishes from award-winning chefs and cookbook writers, and freshen up your repertoire. Here are a few of our recent favorites:

Recipe: Sticky Barbecued Pork With Asian Greens

Donna Hay, Australia’s go-to home cook, has a new collection of recipes out that will inspire you to eat more healthfully while sacrificing nothing in terms of flavor and aesthetics. Whether you’re making yourself a casual lunch or masterminding an upscale dinner party, this is one book that will help ensure that everyone is nourished, satisfied and eager to know where you got the recipe. This shiny, laquered pork pairs beautifully with Asian greens and looks beautiful on a platter.

lemongrass pork meatballs recipe
These fragrant lemongrass pork meatballs need little more than a bed of coconut rice for a hearty dinner.

Recipe: Lemongrass Pork Meatballs

A lemongrass stalk adds flavor to stocks, soups, and curries. For this recipe, use only the bottom 4 inches: cut off the bottom, peel off and discard any dry outer layers to get to the tender bulb, trim it to 4 inches, and proceed with the recipe.

Sherry-Glazed Pork Belly
This sherry-glazed pork belly from award-winning chef Naomi Pomeroy is a beautiful block of porky perfection.

Recipe: Naomi Pomeroy’s Sherry-Glazed Pork Belly

This dish is all about balance—the sherry glaze brings an acidic touch that cuts through the richness, and the toasted levain bread that it’s served on soaks up some of the porky juices.

pork chops
These flavor-packed stuffed pork cutlets are a far cry from their frozen kin.

Recipe: Cúrate‘s Cheese-Stuffed Fried Pork Chops

These cheesy, crunchy pork chops are the most popular kid-friendly meal in Spain. They’re usually thrown together with cheap, rubbery cheese, so I’ve decided to elevate it for discerning kids and all adults. I shave the cheese fresh from a block of Cordobés or Manchego and add piquillos to cut through the richness and bring some brightness in taste and appearance. Plus, vegetables. I like the pork-on-pork action with the chops and ham, but the same technique can be applied to skinless, boneless chicken breasts, too.

porkbutt
Stack up these breaded pork butt sticks to look like a campfire. Why the heck not, right?

Recipe: “Campfire” Pork Butt

I made this for lunch one day and giggled when I serve it up. It bore an uncanny resemblance to a campfire. The funny thing is, I’d just returned from a few days’ camping and fishing and, for some reason, I was still in autopilot mode of setting up a campfire — in this case with anything!

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NYC: Tonight’s Taste Of The Nation Has A Better Culinary Lineup Than Ever http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/24/buy-ticket-tonights-taste-nation/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/04/24/buy-ticket-tonights-taste-nation/#respond Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:00:44 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=168620 Food festivals and events are a dime a dozen these days, but there’s always been something different about the annual Taste of the Nation celebration, taking place tonight in New York City. The yearly nosh fest features over 40 of the city’s top restaurants and bars serving up all-you-can-eat menu items and drinks for a great cause. All […]

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Taste of the Nation
Want seconds — or thirds — of one of the many dishes on offer tonight? Go for it!

Food festivals and events are a dime a dozen these days, but there’s always been something different about the annual Taste of the Nation celebration, taking place tonight in New York City. The yearly nosh fest features over 40 of the city’s top restaurants and bars serving up all-you-can-eat menu items and drinks for a great cause. All proceeds from the event benefit No Kid Hungry’s work to end childhood hunger in America.

Taste of the Nation 2017 will be led by Honorary Chair Danny Meyer (Union Square Hospitality Group) along with Culinary Co-Chairs Anita Lo (Annisa) and Bryce Schuman (Betony). The host committee includes chefs Eli Sussman (Samesa), Chris Jaeckle (Uma Temakeria), William Elliot (Maison Premiere and Sauvage), Jack Logue (Betony), Flynn McGarry (Eureka) and Oskar Kostecki (Union Square Wines).

Special bites for the event include dishes from a number of newer and yet-to-open establishments, such the re-located Union Square Café, Ataboy, Lalito, Samesa, Pig Bleecker, Daily Provisions, Massoni, Sugarcane Raw Bar and more. A few of the bars on hand to serve cocktails include The Dead Rabbit, Dante and Cienfuegos. A full list of participants serving up food and drink items — as well as information about tickets, which are still available — can be found on the event’s official website.

Think the $250 general admission ticket price is steep? Well, think about how much you shelled out for the last set-course menu at the latest downtown or Brooklyn hot spot. That’s about what you’d spend at such a restaurant per-person, and here, you get to sample a crazy array of dishes and beverages from the likes of A-list restaurants, all while interacting with chefs and industry insiders and contributing to a worthy cause. This is, without a doubt, one of the year’s premier food and drink events. Taste of the Nation is also introducing new special culinary programming, such as The Candy Carnival featuring a colorful selection of local, handmade candies.

Date: Monday, April 24, 2017
Location: 180 Maiden Street, New York, NY 10038
Time: 7 p.m. for GA; 6 p.m. for VIP
Admission: $250 for general admission; $400 for VIP

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