Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com Where Food, Drink & Culture Unite Fri, 24 Nov 2017 16:00:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 Listen To Food Republic Today: Sam Sifton’s A-Plus Leftovers Advice http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/24/listen-food-republic-today-sam-siftons-plus-leftovers-advice/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/24/listen-food-republic-today-sam-siftons-plus-leftovers-advice/#respond Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:00:38 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176559 Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. When Sam Sifton published his book, Thanksgiving: How To Cook It Well, in 2012, we hit him up for advice, including what to do with leftovers. “The way it works with Thanksgiving leftovers is as follows: the best Thanksgiving sandwich is […]

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When Sam Sifton published his book, Thanksgiving: How To Cook It Well, in 2012, we hit him up for advice, including what to do with leftovers. “The way it works with Thanksgiving leftovers is as follows: the best Thanksgiving sandwich is the first one that you eat. You eat it as soon as you get hungry again, in the kitchen, probably barefoot and when it’s dark.” That’s Sifton, the New York Times food editor and master scene-setter. So today, as we continue to come down from yesterday’s feast, we turn to Sam again to go deeper, to definitively tell us how to turn that carcass into turkey stock. He calls in as the guest on Food Republic Today. Listen to what the man has to say. Also, hey, it’s something called Black Friday, so we turn to FR contributor Kaitlyn Thornton, who’s working on this year’s gift guide, for advice on how to give awesome gifts.
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Food Republic Today is hosted by our Editorial Director, Richard Martin, with co-host Krista Ruane, Zero Point Zero culinary creative director, and produced by Zero Point Zero Production. Katie Guhl is our producer. The episode features music by Ghostly International artists including Michna, whose “Metal Baile Joint” is the theme song.

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Listen To Food Republic Today: Italian Thanksgiving With Angie Rito And Scott Tacinelli Of NYC’s Don Angie http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/23/frt-italian-thanksgiving-don-angie/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/23/frt-italian-thanksgiving-don-angie/#respond Thu, 23 Nov 2017 12:00:58 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176466 Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Happy Thanksgiving! Husband and wife chef team Angie Rito and Scott Tacinelli of the hot new Italian restaurant Don Angie in New York City discuss the, uh, nuances of the Italian-American Thanksgiving in today’s special holiday podcast. Anyone who’s ever been served […]

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Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Happy Thanksgiving! Husband and wife chef team Angie Rito and Scott Tacinelli of the hot new Italian restaurant Don Angie in New York City discuss the, uh, nuances of the Italian-American Thanksgiving in today’s special holiday podcast. Anyone who’s ever been served a lasagna and some of Uncle Vito’s homemade wine will know what we’re talkin’ about, and those who haven’t will enjoy this spirited conversation. Rito and Tacinelli, the rising stars who helped the Quality Meats and Quality Italian grow into multi-destination sensations, get into their Italian-American bona fides (Rito’s from Cleveland; Tacinelli from Jersey), and also talk about what’s going on at the perpetually packed Don Angie. But first, we check in with some of our favorite chefs to see what they’re doing on Turkey Day. We highly recommend listening to this episode while doing all your Thanksgiving cooking!

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Food Republic Today is hosted by our Editorial Director, Richard Martin, with co-host Krista Ruane, Zero Point Zero culinary creative director, and produced by Zero Point Zero Production. Katie Guhl is our producer. The episode features music by Ghostly International artists including Michna, whose “Metal Baile Joint” is the theme song.

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Last-Minute Thanksgiving Sides To Bring To The Table http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/22/last-minute-thanksgiving-sides/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/22/last-minute-thanksgiving-sides/#respond Wed, 22 Nov 2017 16:00:10 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176491 Bust out the whisks and ready the basters, Thanksgiving is here and there’s no time to spare! Pick a couple of these great Thanksgiving sides and round out your dinner table. It’s not like it’ll buckle under the weight of a couple of extra dishes, right? Peruse our latest recipes from the worlds of squash, root vegetables, potatoes, […]

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Bust out the whisks and ready the basters, Thanksgiving is here and there’s no time to spare! Pick a couple of these great Thanksgiving sides and round out your dinner table. It’s not like it’ll buckle under the weight of a couple of extra dishes, right? Peruse our latest recipes from the worlds of squash, root vegetables, potatoes, green beans and other staples and find your favorite new Turkey Day addition.

Recipe: Roasted Parsnips With Hazelnuts & Feta

If you can’t find baby parsnips, larger parsnips cut lengthways into quarters will do the trick. The nuttiness of parsnips and hazelnuts pair very well together.

spaghettisquash

Recipe: Spaghetti Squash Patties With Sriracha Mayo

Baking spaghetti squash magically turns the firm yellow flesh into spaghetti-like ribbons or strands, which make a great pasta alternative whenever you’d like a lower-carb meal. Deep-frying the squash strands makes for an incredible-looking patty, highlighting all the glorious ‘spaghetti’ strands and giving a great amount of crunch. If you are opting for a healthier approach, shallow-frying works well too, although the crunch won’t be quite as pronounced.

Green Beans With Black Sesame
Make a simple side of green beans with black sesame dressing in 30 minutes or less.

Recipe: Green Beans With Black Sesame Dressing

Compared to white sesame seeds, black ones have a stronger flavor and therefore dark or normal soy sauce can be used.

Radish And Kale Salad
This colorful salad is a welcome pairing to grilled chicken or fish. Dig in!

Recipe: Lemony Fennel, Radish And Kale Salad

I receive one twinkly-eyed question nearly without fail whenever I share the name of my website: Do you eat kale and caramel together? I’m left to confess that not only do I never combine the two, I’ve never even wanted to try. The name for the blog came to me one night, mid-dishwashing, as my friend and mentor Rebecca was urging me to create a digital home for my food and writing. But what would I call it? I lamented. I summoned to mind the two foods I could think of that I loved most: Kale. And caramel. And thus the blog was born. At the risk of sounding too heady, it was more a concept than a suggestion for a new flavor combination.

Chinese sausage fritters
Fry up a big batch of crisp, sweet and savory Chinese sausage fritters. You’ll need them.

Recipe: Sweet Potato And Chinese Sausage Fritters

An addictive treat, these fritters are creamy and soft inside and super crunchy on the outside. They get their exceptional crunch from the panko crust. Panko is a Japanese bread crumb that is puffed so that it fries up light and crispy. You can find panko in most grocery stores, along with small cans of red curry paste (often labeled “Thai”) and plastic jars of sambal oelek. You’ll likely have to visit an Asian grocery store to find Chinese sausage, sometimes labeled “lap cheong.” It is a firm, cured sausage that is reddish in color like salami with a distinctive sweet flavor. Feel free to substitute chopped-up chorizo, bacon, or ham, or leave it out altogether for a vegetarian version. If you can find Japanese sweet potatoes, which have a purple skin and are especially sweet, definitely use those; otherwise, regular sweet potatoes or even yams work well here.

Filo Ratatouille
These crisp triangular bundles of savory ratatouille are a winner every time.

Recipe: Filo Ratatouille Samosas

A friendly tomato twist on the favorite samosa. Once you’ve mastered the folding method, you’ll be making them in your sleep.

sheet pan mac and cheese
Spread your mac and cheese on a baking sheet, top with fresh breadcrumbs and bake to crunchy perfection.

Recipe: Crispy, Crunchy Sheet Pan Mac And Cheese

Who doesn’t love the crunchy top layer of mac ’n’ cheese? Baking this favorite dish in a sheet pan ensures a high ratio of crispy topping to creamy noodles. In this version, a layer of golden bread crumbs enshrouds blistered cubes of mozzarella, which stretch with every pull of the fork, clinging to the noodles trailing in its wake. This mac ’n’ cheese can be cut into squares like sheet-pan pizza and needs nothing more than a simple green salad on the side.

Onion Tarte Tatin
Use sweet, tender pearl onions to their most delicious potential in this savory tart.

Recipe: Pearl Onion Tarte Tatin

Before you start, place your raw onions in the skillet and make sure that they fit very snugly. They will shrink a bit as they cook, so if you start with a slightly crowded pan, you’ll end up with perfect coverage. We usually make this with a mix of onion types, so there’s some pretty variation in color even as they caramelize. Likewise, we call for white balsamic vinegar, as regular balsamic will darken the onions more than we like. Serve this with a crisp, sharp salad and maybe a cup of soup.

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Daniel Patterson Is Expanding His Egalitarian Mission To Los Angeles http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/22/daniel-patterson-egalitarian-los-angeles/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/22/daniel-patterson-egalitarian-los-angeles/#respond Wed, 22 Nov 2017 14:00:44 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176441 Bay Area chef Daniel Patterson recently traded in his Michelin-rated job as chef of Coi to run fast food chain LocoL in Oakland and Los Angeles and neighborhood fast casual restaurant Alta in San Francisco. Earlier this month, Patterson stopped by Food Republic headquarters to tell our podcast listeners all about his new The Art of […]

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Bay Area chef Daniel Patterson recently traded in his Michelin-rated job as chef of Coi to run fast food chain LocoL in Oakland and Los Angeles and neighborhood fast casual restaurant Alta in San Francisco. Earlier this month, Patterson stopped by Food Republic headquarters to tell our podcast listeners all about his new The Art of Flavor and what he’s planning with Alta and LocoL. Read the conversation below.

You recently returned to the kitchen at Coi to cook a dinner with the co-author of your new book, The Art of Flavor, perfumer Mandy Aftel. What was that like?
It was great. We had a very nice event, people were very enthusiastic. I traded courses with Matt Kirkley, the chef, and it was fun.

What dishes did you make from the cookbook?
None. The book is really home cooking. When people are coming to a fancy restaurant for dinner, I want to make restaurant food. But, the book is about flavor, so really anything that we made was going to involve some of the principals of the book. So that’s what we really talked about, even though Matt’s food is a little different in style, the underlying principles are very similar.

It’s a cool concept, working with somebody who’s a trained nose and focusing on the sensual aspect of food. Some of the recipes in the book are funny. Like, my least favorite spice, cinnamon, shows up in a spaghetti sauce. You’ve got carrots being cooked with coffee beans. Where did you come up with this stuff and how did it come together?
The carrot and coffee beans is actually recipe from 2011 from Coi. It came out of a time when I was cooking for a magazine with Rene Redzepi. We were in my house, I was going to make coffee, he was holding a squash, said “What should we do with this?” I looked at the coffee and I’m like, “What about coffee?” And he was like, “We bury it in coffee beans!” That kind of started that thinking. I went back to my kitchen and cooked carrots in coffee. He went back and buried things in spices and roasted them. A lot of the book is about just paying attention and allowing the sensory input that you get through what you smell, through what you sense, but also through what you remember, to guide these kind of jumps of inspiration, which seem really weird but then once you kind of think about it and break it apart, it makes sense. Carrots: sweet, earthy. Coffee’s kind of bitter and earthy. They link together to create a flavor that’s neither one nor the other. The cinnamon, which you hate, has a completely different effect on tomatoes. You might go to, for example, Greece and find a tomato sauce with cinnamon. What’s interesting is that you think about tomatoes and basil, right? Well, basil and cinnamon share an aromatic molecule, so there’s actually a recipe in there with duck breast with cinnamon in it and it’s garnished with basil. The two things play off of each other. So, in a way, even cinnamon and basil are not as far as you think.

Given the season, how does pumpkin spice fit into everything?
[laughs] I don’t deal with pumpkin spice.

[laughs] Alright. Good answer. So it’s old news now that you’ve handed off the head chef job at Coi after earning two Michelin stars. With Alta and LocoL, you’re focused less on stars and accolades and more on feeding people better. Would you say that’s correct?
Definitely.

What does it take to make that transition? Philosophically in your head, you’re going from cooking very high-end food to trying to make something that people are going to relate to more immediately.
I can see how that would seem like a very strange or distant step, but for me, it’s all the same. From cooking a tasting menu or if I’m flipping burgers, it all really comes down to this feeling of love and connection, the desire to feed people. For me it’s like there’s a continuum, and things on different points of the spectrum, but they’re all linked together. It’s all feeding people to me.

What about LocaL? Can you give us an update on how that’s going? We’ve been pretty obsessed with the mission you and Roy Choi have, to create fast food establishments in places that are maybe underserved and trying to help people have access to affordable food.
It’s going great. So, now we’re in the phase where we’re refining systems, figuring out what works best, how to streamline things. The team is great. We’re had an amazing response, especially in L.A. The truck has really taken off. We do a lot of catering and we do a lot of parties. So that’s really fun for the team because they get to go all over the city and engage with a lot of different kinds of people.

Does it still, in your opinion, have the ability to become a vehicle of change, to actually improve access to food in food deserts?
Definitely. So there are two things: one is about how people eat and the other is access to economic opportunity. The hiring aspect and the training aspect is just as important, and maybe in some respects, maybe more important. For example, at Alta, we have four people that started at LocoL, who are now working with us: the bartender, the kitchen manager, sauté cook, a server. So, it’s not an end in itself, it’s a beginning. It’s something that can lead to something else because if I look down the road, what I’d love to see — and what I think is going to happen — is that people will start at LocoL, they will rise and eventually, the ones with the drive and the creativity, they’ll move on and start their own businesses. They then start their own micro-universes, they do their own hiring, they run their businesses in their own way. Through that spread into the ecosystem that there’s not a lot of opportunity right now to get there.

On the West Coast, I’m sure everybody knows your story a lot better, but for the rest of us in the country, can you explain a little bit about Alta and what your mission is there, what kind of food you’re creating and maybe share some news about it? I think you’re about to open in Los Angeles soon?
Alta is meant to be a really good neighborhood restaurant. It’s fun, good food and drinks, not too expensive and really designed as a gathering place, a communal place where everyone feels comfortable. It’s based on the same principles as LocoL. We actually worked with a non-profit called ROC United, which is based in New York but it’s kind of a national non-profit that works with low-income workers and a lot of people in the restaurant industry to create more opportunity. We worked on a racial equity program, which systematizes a solution to an industry-wide problem to lack of good jobs and how that’s kind of limiting. The same principles that exist in Locol are also in Alta, with a different focus of being really good neighborhood fine dining casual restaurant.

Can you talk about commitment to Oakland and how the city and the community has evolved over the years you’ve lived and worked there?
That’s a great question. Obviously, a lot of people from San Francisco are moving to Oakland now. It’s changing in ways that I don’t even know how to describe. I’ve lived there for a long time. I love Oakland, I love the people there, it’s my hometown. Its soul, its heart is so strong, in terms of what is going to be as it becomes more, let’s just say attractive, for people moving from more affluent areas and as housing prices increase and all of that. I don’t know. For right now, it’s an amazing place.

How has that growth around the whole area affected the restaurant scene? Bay Area real estate issues have been in the top of the news nationwide. What does it mean for the restaurant scene in the Bay Area?
Honestly, it’s made it more difficult. The costs coming up have not been met with a similar enthusiasm on the costumer side to pay more money for things. For us, we’re partnering with a hotel called The Grant. It’s on 7th Street and Market Street. It’s about three blocks away from our original location. Locating with a restaurant downstairs and a rooftop bar upstairs, feeding off the 200 people per night that are going to stay there, plus the surrounding community, that’s one way I think we can be a little insulated or create a little more traffic flow. The Los Angeles restaurant that you mentioned earlier in the West Adams community, we’re really excited about that as well, to kind of expand into other cities. As for what the future holds, I’m not sure, but it’s definitely changed a lot.

A lot of chefs are known for hard-partying lifestyles. You’re more known as a cerebral chef and thinker. How do you feel about that reputation?
You mean I don’t drink enough. [laughs]

You said it. [laughs]
Yeah, I’m really boring. It’s true. I think people are going to think what they think. We’re in a culture that really revolves around branding, labeling, creating narratives that are easy to understand. I’m more concerned about the people around that are around me and am I taking care of them, am I communicating well. What the outside world thinks, I don’t know.

You described cooking, before, as being more egalitarian than I maybe would’ve imagined. Do you ever feel like you have to dumb down things for diners to get them to eat something that may be better for them?
Not at all. I think as a cook, if you’re thinking that the people you’re cooking for are dumb, I don’t even know how to think about that perspective. You want to meet people where they’re at. Maybe different groups of people, different cultural backgrounds have different expectations. I want people to be happy. If I know that certain ways of cooking are going to make someone more happy, then I’m going to gravitate towards that. I don’t think about it as an intelligent test, people just like what they like.

Can you describe a day when you took a day off and what did you do?
[laughs] No. Let me think about that. I don’t take a lot of days off, more like an hour here and there. One time, maybe about a month ago, I went away with my family. We had an entire day off. I turned my phone off and that was really wonderful to spend time with my wife and two children in a really concentrated way without the outside world coming in.

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Listen To Food Republic Today: Esther Choi, Gluten Free Girl, Jenny Yang http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/22/frt-esther-choi-thanksgiving-jenny-yang/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/22/frt-esther-choi-thanksgiving-jenny-yang/#respond Wed, 22 Nov 2017 12:25:23 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176461 Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. New York chef Esther Choi takes a brief break from her restaurants Mokbar and Ms. Yoo to chat with us on today’s episode, spilling on everything from her Korean roots to why her kitchens are only staffed by women to her dog situation. […]

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Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

New York chef Esther Choi takes a brief break from her restaurants Mokbar and Ms. Yoo to chat with us on today’s episode, spilling on everything from her Korean roots to why her kitchens are only staffed by women to her dog situation. But first, we hear from the Gluten Free Girl herself, Shauna Ahern. She guides us through hosting a celiac-friendly Thanksgiving as well as tips on being the gluten-sensitive guest. We wrap things up with more turkey talk from comedian Jenny Yang, who recounts her hilarious experience cooking Thanksgiving dinner for her parents for the first time.

Further watching:

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Food Republic Today is hosted by our Editorial Director, Richard Martin, with co-host Krista Ruane, Zero Point Zero culinary creative director, and produced by Zero Point Zero Production. Katie Guhl is our producer. The episode features music by Ghostly International artists including Michna, whose “Metal Baile Joint” is the theme song.

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Don’t Be Guilty Of These Crimes Against Sausage http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/crimes-against-sausage/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/crimes-against-sausage/#respond Tue, 21 Nov 2017 16:00:06 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176420 Sometimes you can have too much of a good thing, as we’ve seen in food news this week. We’re by no means averse to the glory of a nice, crisp sausage. But everyone has to draw a hard line sometimes. Welcome to the week in excessive crimes against sausage, a delicious, comforting and versatile culinary institution. No, […]

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Sometimes you can have too much of a good thing, as we’ve seen in food news this week. We’re by no means averse to the glory of a nice, crisp sausage. But everyone has to draw a hard line sometimes. Welcome to the week in excessive crimes against sausage, a delicious, comforting and versatile culinary institution. No, not ketchup on Chicago dogs — that’s last year’s news. Let’s treat our sausage more nicely that this, folks.

Sausage Plays The “Roll” Of Baby Jesus

A British bakery replaced the baby Jesus in their Christmas-themed display with a sausage roll. It’s not the sausage roll we’re mad at — a sausage roll in a nativity scene manger is hysterical. It’s the backlash against it that’s a crime! Nobody should have to apologize for a little holiday humor. Have you seen Black Friday lately? Absolutely nothing is sacred, and that’s a good thing because playing with your food in the name of a higher power can be very fun.

Tennis Star’s Newborn Recreated Using Sausage Meat

Speaking of sausage babies, Scottish-born tennis superstar Sir Andrew Barron Murray (known better as Andy Murray) and wife Kim welcomed a daughter last week. Though Murray resides in England, the butcher shop in his hometown of Glasgow chose to pay an unconventional homage. We just hope they disassembled it and sold it off when they were done with the weirdest selfie we’ve seen in some time now.

crimes against sausage
(12387701/Flickr)

British Streaker Ruins Bangers And Mash For Everyone

A British man ran naked laps around a shopping mall in Southern England. The sausage crime? The Sun the man’s exposed parts “bangers and mash.” Come on, with all the British love for sausage and euphemisms for you-know-what, you’d think they could come up with something a little less terrible-sounding. Mash??

(nichovonakron/Flickr)
(nichovonakron/Flickr)

Sausage-Contests Are Rarely A Good Idea

Whether you’re eating them, making them, throwing them or what have you, the words “sausage” and “contest” probably shouldn’t go together. New Zealand butcher Corey Winder attempted the break the Guinness World Record for most sausages made in a minute. While kind of impressive on a sheer dexterity level, due to the nature of making them, sausages are something that always need an extra degree of cleanliness and food safety. Speed-casing sounds like a recipe for wurstvergiftung.

(149561324/Flickr)
(149561324/Flickr)

Hot Dog Robbery Results In Irreparable Damages

In what’s neither the first nor last time we’ll wonder why people carry guns in their waistbands, a Chicago man paid quite the price for robbing a hot dog stand with a loaded firearm. Upon successful completion of the heist, the man stashed his gun in his pants, accidentally firing a round, as the New York Daily News put it, “into his own South Side.”

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Hot Question: How Do You Use Curry Leaves? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/use-curry-leaves/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/use-curry-leaves/#respond Tue, 21 Nov 2017 15:00:16 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176412 Chef and TV host Anjum Anand has a new book of recipes out that every fan of Indian food should own. Beyond foolproof guides to the classic curries and breads, Anand’s I Love India takes a dive into the ingredients behind the magic. If you think curry leaves smell like curry, you’re in for a […]

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Chef and TV host Anjum Anand has a new book of recipes out that every fan of Indian food should own. Beyond foolproof guides to the classic curries and breads, Anand’s I Love India takes a dive into the ingredients behind the magic. If you think curry leaves smell like curry, you’re in for a surprise. How do you use curry leaves? Let Anand enlighten you. 

Reprinted with permission from I Love India

These lovely, droopy herb leaves – each with a sharp point and a vibrant, glossy green coating – rival coriander (cilantro) in India’s food affections. Curry leaves are an essential ingredient and form part of the “Holy Trinity” of South Indian flavors, along with mustard seeds and coconut. Many people who live on the western coast will grow curry leaves in the garden, and pick stems off as needed. Contrary to their name, they don’t smell of curry, but have a lovely, clear, identifiable aroma of their own.

You really don’t need a reason to cook with these lovely leaves other than their sublime flavour but, according to ancient Indian medics, the herbs are a real powerhouse of health. They are believed to be anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal and anti-bacterial as well as being full of minerals and vitamins so – a bit like turmeric – they are a vital ingredient to include in the diet as often as possible. In Indian Ayurvedic medicine, curry leaves are believed to relieve congestion, detoxify the liver, stabilize insulin and blood sugar levels (so great for diabetics), be helpful for anaemia as their folic acid helps absorb iron, and be good for digestion and cholesterol levels. My father-in-law eats two or three curry leaves on an empty stomach with a couple of black peppercorns and a date every morning, as part of his health regime… his vitamins, so to speak!

On a cosmetic note, curry leaves are thought to be really good for bad skin and dry, damaged or limp hair: you blend a good handful of the fresh leaves, heat them gently with some cosmetic oil, then massage into the skin or hair as necessary.

To get the best out of curry leaves, they only need to be fried in a little oil to release their inherent flavor, then be cooked until lightly crisp. Unfortunately, fresh curry leaves don’t keep for long, so when you buy a batch, wrap what you think you might use (still on their stems) in moist kitchen paper and keep them in the fridge. Dry the rest on baking sheets and then store in an airtight container; they won’t have as much flavor, so use them with a heavier hand, but they will still liven up any dish.

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Books To Devour: 8 Culinary Must-Reads We’re Loving http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/8-culinary-must-reads/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/8-culinary-must-reads/#respond Tue, 21 Nov 2017 14:00:36 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176409 Nothing stokes your appetite or desire for a big cooking project like digging into these great culinary must-reads. Whether you’re looking to dive deep into the long and storied world of cheese, take a peek into the award-winning kitchens of molecular gastronomist Wylie Dufresne or get really, really geeky, we’ve got a book list for […]

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Nothing stokes your appetite or desire for a big cooking project like digging into these great culinary must-reads. Whether you’re looking to dive deep into the long and storied world of cheese, take a peek into the award-winning kitchens of molecular gastronomist Wylie Dufresne or get really, really geeky, we’ve got a book list for you. They’re not all cookbooks (and even the cookbooks aren’t necessarily cookbooks per se) but they’re all packed with brand-new information that will surprise and delight you.

Recipe Shorts By Andrea Stewart

Short is the new long, when it comes to recipes that is. Use a combination of good old-fashioned intuitive know-how and delightfully brief suggestions from Recipe Shorts, a new kind of cookbook from food editor, author and entrepreneur Andrea Stewart. Follow your instincts and just enough of Stewart’s advice, and enjoy a quick, simple dinner you made almost entirely on the fly!

Cheddar
If you’re not craving the sharpest Cheddar you can find by the end of this, there’s something wrong with you.

The Book Of Cheese by Liz Thorpe

Cheese expert and Murray’s Cheese alum Liz Thorpe is the queen of the stuff. In The Book of Cheese, she maps out all the a brand new way of understanding cheese: Gateways. Instead of categorizing by region or milk type, Thorpe groups like-minded cheeses. Are you a fan of taleggio? Try the Red Hawk. Read this book, go beyond bries and goats and get to know Cheddar like never before.

The Geeky Chef Strikes Back
(Photo: The Geeky Chef)Chimicherrychangas from My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, a must-watch for fans of ponies, friendship and magic.

The Geeky Chef Strikes Back by Cassandra Reeder

There are plenty of cookbooks out there based on fantasy — novels, movies, video games, table-top role playing games involving dungeons and/or dragons. The possibilities are endless. Everyone’s gotta eat, right? Can’t have a fantasy world without some fuel. Cassandra Reeder, better known as blogger The Geeky Chef, is the mistress of the culinary underbellies of these bastions of make-believe. Her newest cookbook, The Geeky Chef Strikes Back is a follow-up to her eponymous 2015 book, and a deep dive into some of the nerdiest delights around.

History Of Chile Con Queso
Do you know how chile con queso originated? Dip on into this essential knowledge!

Queso! by Lisa Fain

There’s a very good reason there’s an exclamation point at the end of Homesick Texan Lisa Fain’s new cookbook, Queso! It’s hard not to say it without, well, exclaiming! If there’s one dish in the Texas repertoire to be truly excited about, it’s queso. This book has every recipe — plus some essential knowledge — you could ever need to become a true master. Take it one step further and learn the history of chile con queso before you dip your next chip.

Deep-Fry Mayonnaise
This savory deep-fried mayo cube is just waiting to be pierced by a fork.

wd~50: The Cookbook by Wylie Dufresne

Take a peek into the wild kitchens and labs of renowned chef and molecular gastronomy master Wylie Dufresne, with wd-50: The Cookbook. While you won’t find any quick and easy dinners in this formidable tome, make sure to pick it up if you’re looking to break into the science of his stunning dishes (or simply wish to admire them at length). Ever wonder how to deep-fry mayonnaise the Dufresne way?

michael harlan turkell
Join author Michael Harlan Turkell as he journeys around the world of vinegar.

Acid Trip by Michael Harlan Turkell

Award-winning food photographer and writer Michael Harlan Turkell’s new book takes you on a trip so powerful your head will spin (with gustatory delight, that is). Acid Trip chronicles Turkell’s extensive study of vinegar, an element in nearly every ethnic cuisine. Vinegar has been used as a seasoning and preserving agent for thousands of years, and we’re hard-pressed to think of a better deep-dive for the tart-loving food nerd. Ever wonder where balsamic vinegar comes from?

Slow Cooker Commandments
Martha Stewart is a slow cooker fanatic — learn her ways and use them forever.

Martha Stewart’s Slow Cooker by the editors of Martha Stewart Living

You can rely on Martha Stewart for all things home and garden, and her cookbooks are no exception. Her latest, Martha Stewart’s Slow Cooker, is packed with everything you need to utilize this amazingly versatile kitchen appliance to the best of its myriad abilities. Before you fire it up and get cooking, make sure you read Martha’s slow cooker commandments.

Cheers To The Publican
Cheers to the Publican! Book a table on your next trip to the Windy City.

Cheers To The Publican, Repast And Present by Paul Kahan, Cosmo Goss and Rachel Holtzman

We’re massive fans of award-winning Chicago chef Paul Kahan’s new cookbook, Cheers to the Publican, out now. Beyond the sublime recipes selected from the Publican’s meaty repertoire, however, we couldn’t help noticing the delightful poems at the beginning of each chapter. They’re homages to the ingredients at hand, odes to the glories of harmonious flavors and beautiful works of literature unto themselves. Here are a few of our favorites, but pick up a copy of your own and read them all! Oh, and make the recipes too.

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Listen To Food Republic Today: Rico Torres And Diego Galicia Of San Antonio’s Mixtli http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/frt-rico-torres-diego-galicia-mixtli/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/21/frt-rico-torres-diego-galicia-mixtli/#respond Tue, 21 Nov 2017 12:00:53 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176453 Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Today’s episode brings us the team behind San Antonio’s Mixtli, Diego Galicia and Rico Torres. The chef-partners have become revered for their tasting-menu-only explorations of regional Mexican food. They stop by the Food Republic Today studio to discuss how San Antonio […]

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Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Today’s episode brings us the team behind San Antonio’s Mixtli, Diego Galicia and Rico Torres. The chef-partners have become revered for their tasting-menu-only explorations of regional Mexican food. They stop by the Food Republic Today studio to discuss how San Antonio has reacted to their bold concept, why they are not a good last-minute restaurant option and more. But first, Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski of San Francisco’s State Bird Provisions tells us what they’ve got planned for Thanksgiving. We wrap up with chef Chris Consentino’s take on a few food trends.

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10 Thanksgiving Cakes To Dazzle Your Guests http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/20/10-thanksgiving-cakes/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/20/10-thanksgiving-cakes/#respond Mon, 20 Nov 2017 16:00:40 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176361 How mad will the pumpkin pie be when you set one of these gems right next to it? Really mad. Here are a few of our favorite Thanksgiving cakes for Practice Thanksgiving. It’s the same as regular Thanksgiving, but with way fewer people. — and almost none of the kvetching. What do you mean we’re not embracing […]

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How mad will the pumpkin pie be when you set one of these gems right next to it? Really mad. Here are a few of our favorite Thanksgiving cakes for Practice Thanksgiving. It’s the same as regular Thanksgiving, but with way fewer people. — and almost none of the kvetching. What do you mean we’re not embracing the spirit of Thanksgiving? There are chipotles in the chocolate cake!

Recipe: Pumpkin Upside-Down Cake With Caramelized Pears

In pastry chef Jackie Sappington’s hands, the classic caramel-soaked cake gets an autumnal makeover. Pears stand in for the usual pineapple, and the tender cake is blended with rum raisins, cinnamon, nutmeg, and pumpkin puree.

ginger apple cake
Get ready for a fall treat that blows your pumpkin spice latte out of the water.

Recipe: Cardamom Ginger Apple Cake

I was first introduced to cardamom as a child while visiting my paternal grandmother Teta. She made sweet, strong, Arabic coffee scented with cardamom. In this recipe, the rich, earthy cardamom pairs with warm ginger and apples to create a cake that tastes like fall and reminds me of the warmth of my grandmother’s home.

Walnut Bundt Cake
Make this sweet, citrusy walnut bundt cake infused with zesty orange.

Recipe: Orange Walnut Bundt Cake

I love assembling this cake: filling the pan with some of the batter, spooning in a hidden ring of marmalade, and covering it gingerly with the remaining batter. This cake can be served as is or with a simple glaze for a brunch. Or it can be topped with a buttercream or dark chocolate ganache and become dessert for a dinner party.

flourless chipotle chocolate cake
This flourless chocolate cake is hiding a spicy surprise within.

Recipe: Flourless Chipotle Chocolate Cake

In essence this dessert has more in common with a souffle than a cake, but nonetheless it is a decadent end to a great meal. Try to find a good-quality semisweet chocolate that is at least 60 percent cocoa. Julia’s addition of chipotle lends just a touch of spice to her signature recipe, which couples beautifully with the richness of the chocolate.

carrotcake
We just made cream-cheese-frosted carrot cake twice as nice!

Recipe: Layered Carrot Cake

Pineapple and freshly grated carrot sing of spring sweetness. Nothing is sacrificed in this lightened-up cream cheese frosting; it’s just as decadent as you always remembered.

cake
Make your dark chocolate cake extra-rich with avocado, not butter.

Recipe: Vegan Dark Chocolate-Avocado Cake

This decadent, fudgy, and dense cake quickly became “the favorite” out of all my vegan baking recipes. Perhaps it’s the use of cocoa powder or delicious, creamy, and good-for-you avocados and coconut oil. Whatever the reasons (probably the chemical endorphins that are released after eating chocolate!), we all went mad for it. If you’re making this cake for a special occasion, you can double the recipe and make a two-layer cake.

Sweet Potato Hummingbird Cake
Ashley Christensen’s sweet potato hummingbird cake is a Poole’s Diner must-try.

Recipe: Ashley Christensen’s Sweet Potato Hummingbird Cake

There’s a debate that rages in all corners of the dessert-eating universe: cake or pie? It’s of particular importance in the South, where both tall-as-the-sky layer cakes and blue-ribbon pies are matters of pride and heritage. Though Poole’s has pie in its blood, we could never get away with omitting cake from the lineup.

Orange Polenta Cake
This naturally gluten-free cake is as beautiful as it is delicious.

Recipe: Orange Polenta Cake

Nothing beats the smell of this deeply sensuous cake baking in the oven. It’s enough to make me lose my mind and want to scoff the entire thing in a millisecond. But (but, but, but!) patience is the key here because you’ll have to wait until it’s completely cool before slathering it in the unctuous cashew frosting that sends this cake from merely fantastic into the baking stratosphere — yes, it really is that good. What makes it all the more satisfying is the sheer simplicity of its construction (you really don’t need to be a master baker to accomplish this one) and the über crumbly texture, which makes it the perfect accompaniment to a traditional cup of tea — take it from me, this pairing is absolute, unadulterated bliss. So, what are you waiting for? Get the kettle on, it’s time for tea and cake.

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Scenes From The Other Night: Mind Of A Chef‘s Premiere Party http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/20/moac-premiere-party/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/11/20/moac-premiere-party/#respond Mon, 20 Nov 2017 14:00:17 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=176341 The Mind of a Chef‘s sixth season was celebrated Thursday, November 16 at chef Danny Bowien’s NYC flagship Mission Chinese Food. What was in the goodie bag, you asked? A lemongrass and pepper candle from Squarespace, copies of Tepsic and Cured magazines, a Sweetgreen hat and other delectable treats! The sixth season of The Mind of a […]

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The Mind of a Chef‘s sixth season was celebrated Thursday, November 16 at chef Danny Bowien’s NYC flagship Mission Chinese Food. What was in the goodie bag, you asked? A lemongrass and pepper candle from Squarespace, copies of Tepsic and Cured magazines, a Sweetgreen hat and other delectable treats!

The sixth season of The Mind of a Chef dives into the brain of Bowien, exploring his multi-hyphenated identity, and what inspires his unique fusion cuisine. The first three episodes are now exclusively available on Facebook Watch. New episodes will air on Facebook Watch every Tuesday. The show’s new website is also now live on Squarespace. Check out some photos from the party below.

(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)Mission Chinese Food
party
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Youngmi Mayer, Danny Bowien and Kim Hastreiter.
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) The big head
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) ZPZ co-founders Chris Collins and Lydia Tenaglia and guest
party
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Lauren Devine performs.
party
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Anthony Bourdain and Bowien
party
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Tartare with roe
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) Prepping in the kitchen
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero)
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) The Tingling Negroni
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) Sam Anderson, Mission Chinese Food’s beverage director
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero)
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Bowien and guests
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) Bowien
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero)
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Kahli Abdu and guests
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) Atmosphere
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) Squarespace’s lemongrass and pepper candle
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero)
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) The bar scene
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero)
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Kahli Adbu performs
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero)
(Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Zero Point Zero) Bowien and Lou Di Palo
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.)
(Photo: Adam Lupsha.) Goodie bag

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