Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com Where Food, Drink & Culture Unite Fri, 22 Jun 2018 18:28:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 Are You A Culinary Expert? How Many Of These 68 Terms Do You Know? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/22/68-culinary-terms-2016/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/22/68-culinary-terms-2016/#respond Fri, 22 Jun 2018 18:25:42 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=162456 Food knowledge is increasingly crucial. You don’t wanna go on a first date to a Moroccan restaurant and have to ask what Mahia is, or travel to Cambodia without knowing anything about amok. Some of you may be familiar with all of these 68 culinary terms, and if you are, you’re a true expert. But for those […]

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Food knowledge is increasingly crucial. You don’t wanna go on a first date to a Moroccan restaurant and have to ask what Mahia is, or travel to Cambodia without knowing anything about amok. Some of you may be familiar with all of these 68 culinary terms, and if you are, you’re a true expert. But for those who want to take their food expertise to the next level, read through the below, and click on the linked words for an even deeper dive.

1. Pastéis de nata

If you’re looking for a new pastry to add to your baking repertoire, there’s no better challenge to master than these perfect Portuguese custard tarts.

what is mastic?
What is mastic? It’s a fruit frequently eaten in Greece, and your favorite new exotic treat. (Photo: liesvanrompaey/Flickr.)

2. Mastic

Mastika, or as we know it, mastic, is a resin derived from the Pistacia lentiscus tree. Nuggets of this dried resin are among the first recorded substances chewed by humans for its refreshing flavor, an early predecessor of modern-day chewing gum.

What is high tea?
Once you’ve lived life with high tea, you’d be hard-pressed to get through the evening without it. (Photo: cumidanciki/Flickr.)

3. High tea

High tea is the British tradition of drinking tea while sitting in high-backed chairs at a table full of plated items such as cold meats, vegetables, pickled fish, potatoes, salads, pies, tarts, homemade bread or crackers with butter, teacakes and fruitcakes.

Dove’s Luncheonette in Chicago gives tepache the special treatment with tequila and Pacifico. (Photo courtesy of Dove’s Luncheonette.)
Dove’s Luncheonette in Chicago gives tepache the special treatment with tequila and Pacifico. (Photo courtesy of Dove’s Luncheonette.)

4. Tepache

Tepache is a pedestrian drink in Mexico made by fermenting pineapple rinds with water, sugar, and spices, often a combination of cloves, cinnamon and allspice.

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There is just one producer of the Moroccan fig-based spirit mahia in the U.S.

5. Mahia

Traditionally distilled as an eau de vie by the Jewish population of Morocco (the Muslim population is not permitted to do so), mahia can be made from either figs or dates and aniseed.

furikake
What is furikake? It’s your steamed rice’s match made in salty umami heaven. (Photo: Jess Kapadia.)

6. Furikake

When dining at a Japanese restaurant, you may have wondered what that “ground-up sushi stuff” on top of your rice is. Fact: It is ground-up sushi stuff, but its proper name is furikake, and once you get to know it, you may have trouble downing a bowl of rice without it.

whitetunav1
Commonly passed off as “white tuna,” escolar has a waxy texture and a rich, buttery taste. (Photo: Daniel Carnaje.)

7. White tuna

This common fish is actually known by a different name, and may not be safe to eat.

3522660966_5a56f3058c_o
Firefly squid has a strong, unique taste that’s primarily attributed to its liver. (Photo: yoppy/Flickr.)

8. Firefly squid

This miniature squid lights up like a firefly, hence its name.

MASR_V2_D080_Making_pulque
Pulque, the agave-based fermented beverage, is believed to be the oldest alcoholic drink in North America.

9. Pulque

Before mezcal, before tequila, there was pulque — believed to be the oldest alcoholic beverage in North America.

shiso
Shiso leaf has a distinct, refreshing taste and is used in a number of Japanese dishes. (Photo: Mon OEil/Flickr.)

10. Shiso

The ornamental green (or, less commonly, red-purple) leaves are in the mint family and are often used to provide a refreshing garnish to fish, rice, tempura, soup and vegetable dishes in Japanese cooking.

A bao can be filled with almost anything. (Photos: Nina Gallant.)
A bao can be filled with almost anything. (Photo: Nina Gallant.)

11. Bao

Also known as steamed buns or baozi (包子), bao is a complete meal conveniently packed away in a soft white bun.

Taiwanese boba tea can now be found in San Francisco's Hayes Valley and New York's Lower East Side. (Photo: Boba Guys/Facebook.)
Taiwanese boba tea can now be found in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley and New York’s Lower East Side. (Photo: Boba Guys/Facebook.)

12. Boba tea

Also known as bubble tea, tapioca tea or pearl tea, the drink, traditionally a milk tea served with chewy, black tapioca balls, originated in Taiwan in the 1980s.

remoulade
If you encounter fried fish, be sure you’re armed with enough remoulade to take it down in style. (Photo: dinesarasota/Flickr.)

13. Rémoulade

It’s a rich, tangy, creamy egg- and oil-based emulsion used as a binder, dipping sauce and salad dressing. You can call it “fancy mayo” if you like, but its French name is rémoulade — and you might as well use it!

verrine
They may look like double shot glasses, but the contents hold an entirely different experience. (Photo: topsteph53/Flickr.)

14. Verrine

A verrine is an amuse-bouche or hors d’oeuvre that’s as elegant as it is easy to prepare.

sambal oelek
Sweet, fiery and garlicky, this chunky red paste goes on top of anything that needs a spicy kick. (Photo: Paul Harrison.)

15. Sambal oelek

Sambal oelek has roots in Malaysian and Indonesian cooking. While there are actually hundreds of types of sambal, each with its own blend of chilis and seasonings, in the U.S., sambal oelek is the most common.

soysauce
Powdered soy sauce has more uses than you might think — pick some up! (Photo: thedelicious/Flickr.)

16. Powdered soy sauce

Powdered soy sauce is soy sauce combined with maltodextrin powder, a flavorless starch commonly used in food preservation.

coconutbacon
Toast up coconut flakes with a bacon-like combination of savory umami, smoke flavor and a kick of sweetness and spice. (Photo: kiry/Flickr.)

17. Coconut bacon

Crisp, salty and smoky with just a little sweetness to balance it out, coconut bacon is made with large unsweetened coconut flakes or “chips” (not the fine shreds you bake with).

natto
Sticky natto on top of a bed of white rice is a staple in Japanese homes and restaurants.

18. Natto

According to Tomonori Takada, the president of Ootoya America (a restaurant serving Japanese comfort food, currently with three locations in New York City), the most common way to eat natto is on top of white rice after mixing it with soy sauce.

lobster mince
Lobster mince is the most versatile shellfish ingredient you’ve never cooked with. Break out the pasta roller! (Photo: Dorin Baul.)

19. Lobster mince

Lobster mince is what it sounds like: finely processed meat pulled from the tiny crevices of the lobster body between the bones and knobby joints.

braggot
Photo: Samuel Adams/Facebook

20. Braggot

Braggots are meads made with a hefty proportion of beer, or beers made with a hefty proportion of mead.

BuxtonHash-JohnnyAutry
Chef Eliott Moss’s house-made hash at Buxton Hall Barbecue in Asheville, North Carolina. (Photo: Johnny Autry.)

21. South Carolina hash

What is hash? Well, first, it seems to be a very colloquial South Carolina product.

(Photos: Rina Ogh)
(Photo: Rina Ogh)

22. Rocky Mountain cuisine

We asked a chef from the small Colorado mountain town of Steamboat Springs what exactly the cuisine of these mountains is.

lap cheong
Chinese sausage can be found at any Cantonese butcher shop, hung from the ceiling. (Photo: logatfer/Flickr.)

23. Lap cheong

Traditionally steamed with rice, the coarse, rich and slightly sweet sausage is typically made in links of two with lean meat and identifiable chunks of soft fat, and it does not gather mold like its European cousins.

organic beer
Photo: Peak Organic/Facebook

24. Organic beer

Most organically labeled beers in the U.S. are comprised of ingredients that are at least 95 percent organic.

Wild sorrel by Rahel Jaskow
Wild wood sorrel resembles common clover in appearance but packs a fresh, grassy, tangy flavor that lends itself very well to a variety of culinary applications.

25. Sorrel

Sorrel sounds romantic, like a secret mushroom, special tincture or magical word used to conjure fawns to appear by your side. However, sorrel is none of these things — it’s a simple perennial herb that sprouts eagerly from the ground each spring.

huitlachoche by David Cohen
This strange fungus is a delicacy. (Photo: David Cohen.)

26. Huitlacoche

In simple terms, it’s a plant disease that grows on ears of corn around the kernels in puffy, gray clouds that look kind of like river stones. But when you take this strange fungus into the culinary world, huitlacoche becomes a delicacy used in all sorts of dishes from soups to enchiladas to sauces.

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Mezcal con sal de gusano. (Photo: Raul Ramirez/Flickr.)

27. Sal de gusano (a.k.a. worm salt)

The gusano, or worm, at the bottom of a bottle of cheap mezcal is actually moth larva.

Monteverde_Saba_Bourbon_Soda_ Galdones_Photography
The bourbon and soda cocktail at Monteverde in Chicago uses saba for a flavor boost. (Photo: Galdones Photography.)

28. Saba

When chef Sarah Grueneberg was opening Monteverde earlier this year and knew she wanted to feature a soda on the menu, she quickly dismissed cola and sugarcane for another soft drink base: saba, otherwise known as mosto cotto or cooked grape juice.

denvercut
The Denver cut is from the shoulder, but it’s surprisingly tender.

29. Denver cut

The Denver cut: You know it? Probably not. To be fair — and depending on who you ask — it didn’t really exist until a handful of years ago.

Bitter melon by Karen Christine Hibbard

30. Bitter melon

Instead of being round and sweet-fleshed, bitter melon — also known as bitter squash, balsam-pear, karela and goya in various parts of the world — resembles a cucumber (though flavor-wise you would never compare them).

braai
The South African–style sausage called boerewors. (Photo: CoralBrowne/Creative Commons)

31. Braai

If you’ve never visited South Africa, either on some gourmet safari or otherwise, then you’re probably unfamiliar with braai, the country’s regional style of barbecue.

Amok Curry, photographed at The Secret Garden on Otres Beach in Southern Cambodia, by Jenny Adams-8197
Amok curry at the Secret Garden on Otres Beach in southern Cambodia. (Photo: Jenny Adams.)

32. Cambodian amok

Cambodia’s most famous dish is fish amok. This slightly sweet curry is always presented in a banana leaf bowl, and it has more of a custard consistency thanks to a signature steaming step in preparation.

jackfruit

33. Jackfruit

In its green form, it’s a vegetarian’s dream, and the ripe, yellow fruit is delicious solo or in desserts. Play with jackfruit in the kitchen and surprise your guests with the fruit’s subtly sweet flavor that smacks of banana, peach, tangerine and mango.

CraveFishbar_PorgyPoke
Local Montauk porgy with Persian cucumbers, candied macadamia nuts, scallions, and popped rice. (Photo: Crave Fishbar/Facebook.)

34. Porgy

In Montauk, porgy is often what you get when you’re trying to catch fluke or bass — and you fail. It’s a relatively slow swimmer, easy to catch, and thus has long played second fiddle to its better-known ocean brethren.

nitro beer
An offering from Colorado’s Left Hand Brewing. (Photo: Left Hand Brewing Co./Facebook.)

35. Nitro beer

A number of American-made nitrogen (or nitro) beers are widely available for the first time, thanks largely to recent releases from the biggest craft brewery in the land.

Heston
Chef Heston Blumenthal

36. Neurogastronomy

According to neurogastronomy, taste and flavor are two very different things.

Chef Kevin Adey at Faro in Brooklyn, NY dresses his dry aged duck breast with his variation of fish sauce caramel. (Photo courtesy of Faro.)
Chef Kevin Adey at Faro in Brooklyn, New York, dresses his dry aged duck breast with his variation of fish sauce caramel. (Photo courtesy of Faro.)

37. Fish sauce caramel

What happens when you add fish sauce to some melting sugar? You get something called fish sauce caramel — naam plaa waan in Thai or nuoc mau in Vietnamese — and it can be drizzled over almost anything, according to three New York chefs.

activated charcoal cocktail
The tequila-based Heart of Darkness cocktail at NYC’s Pouring Ribbons

38. Charcoal-activated cocktails

Activated charcoal is a cocktail microtrend (according to Jim Kearns, you don’t really need more than one on your menu), but before that it was used for millennia in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine as a detoxifying agent and to boost digestive health.

tejuino

39. Tejuino

Follow legendary food writer Betty Fussell as she finds out how this low-ABV fermented corn flour is made.

hard seltzer
What’s the difference between spiked seltzer and vodka soda? (Photo: fieldmuzick/Flickr.)

40. Hard seltzer

Spiked sparkling water, or “hard seltzer,” clocks in at a respectable 5 to 6 percent ABV per bottle, around 100 calories per 12-ounce bottle and just a gram or two of sugar.

Bloody_Mary
Photo: William Clifford/Flickr

41. Bloody Mary made with mezcal

What do you call a Bloody Mary made with mezcal?

drinkable butter
Photo: GS Retail

42. Drinkable butter

Described as a “dessert latte” that blends the rich taste of gourmet Normandy butter and fresh milk, the concoction includes a pinch of French salt to draw out further sweetness.

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If you’re looking for a hallucinogenic trip, wormwood’s not a very good place to start.

43. Wormwood

The first thing most people think about when you mention wormwood is absinthe, the magical green booze with the legendary hallucinatory effects. As it turns out, wormwood has more to do with flavor and less with this temporary (but unproven) madness.

maple water
From the tree to the bottle, DRINKmaple could be the next big alternative water. (Photo: Kristen Kellogg.)

44. Maple water

Even the most devout pancake lover might not know one essential thing about maple sap: When it comes out of a tree on a cold spring morning, it is not at all viscous. Rather, fresh sap is roughly the consistency of water, rich in free-radical-fighting manganese, a source of refreshing electrolytes, and just a touch sweet.

bock

45. Bock beer

Why is this style of beer also advertised with a goat?

porchlight
Nicholas Bennett’s cognac Sazerac at Porchlight in New York City

46. Haute dive bars

Haute dives aim to reduce the amount of fussiness commonly associated with so many of today’s drinking dens, yet still maintain a degree of sophistication with regard to recipes and ingredients.

detroit style pizza
Detroit-style pizza goes all the way back to the 1930s and started at Buddy’s in Motor City. (Photo courtesy of Buddy’s.)

47. Detroit-style pizza

It’s baked in a square/rectangular pan, there’s a frico crust, a crispy bottom, an airy middle and stripes of sauce on top.

nigella

48. Nigella seeds

Nigella seeds are probably one of the most confusing spices.

vivian howard meat seasoning
Vivian Howard tells you to season your pig, and we’re inclined to strongly agree.

49. Seasoning meat

Using meat as a seasoning is the Southern way.

what is salsify
Salsify is a seasonal root vegetable you should definitely get your fingers on.

50. Salsify

Salsify, a vegetable that resembles, well, a twig from a tree, hails from the sunflower family (though the plants share little in common with each other). For starters, salsify tastes nothing like a sunflower seed.

12779259_223575544657349_8271169545716330555_o
Forget the sushi burrito. The onigirazu is your new favorite savory lunch item. (Photo: Son-Gohan/Facebook.)

51. Onigirazu

Onigirazu is the love child of an onigiri and tonkatsu sandwich.

what are crosnes?
Crosnes (pronounced “crones”) are a crunchy tuber with a sunchoke-like flavor. Try them in season now!

52. Crosnes

At first glance, this small, lumpy white tuber looks a bit like a fat grub. But fear not: There is nothing insectivorous about the crosne (pronounced “crone”).

Mooncakes1
Handmade mooncakes at the Peninsula Chicago. (Photo courtesy of the Peninsula Chicago.)

53. Mooncakes

These round-shaped pastries, stuffed with a variety of fillings, are the official go-to snack of the traditional Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival.

ketchupleather_final
Have a little texture with your ketchup (and spare your burger buns at the same time). (Photo: Plan Check Kitchen & Bar.)

54. Ketchup Leather

Ketchup Leather is trademarked, and while it may look like the fruit-based cellophane rolls of your childhood, it’s a decidedly grown-up concept.

The Beyond Burger looks like a beef burger at first glance. (Photo: Tiffany Do.)
The Beyond Burger looks like a beef burger at first glance. (Photo: Tiffany Do.)

55. Plant-based protein burgers

Alternatives to meat burgers are plentiful today, from portobello mushrooms to black bean and grain-based, hockey puck–like veggie patties. But none of them truly taste as great as the beef burger. This is where plant-based protein burgers step in.

Honey Butter Ice Cream42
If you haven’t gotten acquainted with the honey butter chip yet, here’s your chance. (Photo: Oiji.)

56. Honey butter chips

Honey butter potato chips have become so ingrained in South Korea’s popular culture that the craze has its own Wikipedia page.

SMoked Mullet Kenny Gilbert

57. Seafood charcuterie

What happens when you smoke and cure mullet and alligator? You end up with the vastly untapped world of seafood charcuterie.

Ripple_48Oz_BottleS_ALL_FLAVORS2
Ripple, a new legume-derived milk, provides the protein and calcium of a glass of cow’s milk with a much smaller carbon footprint.

58. Pea milk

The new plant-based milk is made from protein-rich organic yellow split peas, but Ripple’s patent-pending formula can be used to extract nutrition from most legumes.

baharat_anchor
Many spice shops at the souk had artful displays of Baharat spice, or “a little bit of everything.” (Photo: Jess Kapadia.)

59. Baharat

Like India’s ubiquitous garam masala (translated as “hot spice,” although traditionally there’s no chili powder included), baharat’s name doesn’t indicate what might be in the mix — it’s simply Arabic for “spices.”

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Tabo Noodles is one of the options at the new Chef Street food court inside Macy’s flagship department store in New York City. (Photo: Chef Street/Facebook.)

60. Retail-host restaurants

It’s one of the fastest-growing segments of the U.S. food industry, generating some $40 billion in sales last year. Yet for some inexplicable reason, it’s been given one of the clunkiest names of any kind of eating establishment. We’re talking about the “retail-host” restaurant.

patatas bravas
Classic patatas bravas at El Zorrito in Barcelona. (Photo: Edu González.)

61. Patatas bravas

Legend has it that patatas bravas came about at Barcelona’s Bar Tomás, a place that still offers only half a dozen other items besides the fried potatoes bathed in paprika and oil and topped with aioli.

Calcots2
When you see calçots in Barcelona, you know it’s almost spring.

62. Calçots

High season for calçots, the Catalan green onion, comes during Lent. But purposefully sloppy, social, and even kind of sexy, the eating of calçots habitually results in the kind of ritual abandon that feels like Carnival.

Lupinus_albus
Lupini beans are better-tasting and more nutritious than edamame. Edamame is green with envy. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons.)

63. Lupini beans

Slightly spicy and tangy but also buttery like a gigante bean, lupini beans are a refreshing alternative to the omnipresent garbanzo and cannellini.

what is Dutch process cocoa
Thanks to Dutch-process cocoa, your brownies are nuanced, smooth and totally addictive.

64. Dutch-process cocoa

Although chocolate has long been a darling of the collective human palate, it took the invention of one Dutch chemist in 1825 (or 1828, depending on which source you check) to change the way chocolate was made and consumed.

what are oeufs miroir?
What are oeufs miroir? They’re your new favorite way to eat eggs, French style. (Photo: kimberlykv/Flickr.)

65. Oeufs miroir

Oeufs au miroir or, simply, oeufs miroir, translated as “mirror eggs,” are fried, baked or broiled to form a barely perceptible film or “crown” of white over each yolk.

bluff oysters
Fresh local Bluff oysters at Logan Brown restaurant in Wellington, New Zealand. (Photo: Rachel Tepper Paley.)

66. Bluff oysters

The most prized of these mollusks — briny, sweet and with a tangy metallic finish — grow in the bone-chilling waters of New Zealand’s Foveaux Strait just off the modest seaport of Bluff, the tiny nation’s southernmost town.

bonut
Move over cronut — it’s all about the bonut now.

67. Bonut

A biscuit and doughnut walk into New York City’s Root & Bone, out walks a Bonut.

bholes
Get your cream cheese–stuffed bagel bites at B-Holes bakery.

68. B-Hole

Cream cheese-filled bagel holes are the breakfast waiting for your discovery.

This post has been updated from an earlier post with a new introduction and headline. 

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Food, Drink And Hotel Tips For Your Next Miami Trip http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/21/food-drink-tips-next-miami-trip/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/21/food-drink-tips-next-miami-trip/#respond Thu, 21 Jun 2018 13:00:05 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=182963 With year-round sunshine, an average daily temperature of 76 degrees, and 35 miles of white sand beaches, it’s no wonder Miami is one of our country’s premier vacation getaways (attracting more than 20 million visitors annually). Couple that with a booming food and drink scene and the fact that it’s home to more than 150 […]

The post Food, Drink And Hotel Tips For Your Next Miami Trip appeared first on Food Republic.

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With year-round sunshine, an average daily temperature of 76 degrees, and 35 miles of white sand beaches, it’s no wonder Miami is one of our country’s premier vacation getaways (attracting more than 20 million visitors annually). Couple that with a booming food and drink scene and the fact that it’s home to more than 150 ethnicities and the largest concentration of boutique hotels in the world, and you’re looking at a city that is as much of a tropical paradise as it is a cosmopolitan chef’s playground.

In recent years, much of the action has moved off the Beach, aka South Beach, as neighborhoods on the mainland such as Wynwood (home to the perpetually hot restaurant Alter) and Brickell have developed into destinations, with bustling restaurant, bar and club scenes to rival Collins Ave. Still, the addition of hotels like the Faena and One have kept South Beach relevant—especially when you factor in their dining and entertainment options. In other words, there’s a lot to choose from when you’re headed down to Miami, but here are some tips — some new, some classic — for your next trip.

Where to Eat

Bazaar Mar
Michelin-star winning chef José Andrés helms the menu at this always abuzz Brickell restaurant, which celebrates all things seafood with a seasonal emphasis on Miami and the Caribbean — with crazy clever twists. Roll up a bright and tangy “Asian taco” of Ibérico bellota ham, cured hamachi, and osetra caviar before biting into bold flavors of the Neptune’s Pillow, a doughy pocket layered with tuna sashimi and filled with spicy tuna and rocoto mayo. Don’t miss the extensive raw bar, caviar program, or cocktails (the LN2 Caipirinha calls for liquid nitrogen in lieu of ice for a most theatrical tipple). Come dessert, share the house key lime pie — and take your time. Nautically inflected décor from design powerhouse Philippe Starck makes it easy to linger a while in these parts.

Azabu
This January saw the Miami Beach debut of this Michelin-starred New York restaurant, where executive chef Masatsugu Kubo has become known for upscale and updated takes on authentic Japanese fare. Snag a seat on the patio and order plenty of plates to share, from black miso cod and smoked salmon-kale salad, to caramelized chicken wings and a side-by-side uni tasting. When it comes to the sushi, all eyes are on the beef tataki maki, eight addicting bites of asparagus, truffle oil and fried onion wrapped in paper-thin sheaths of wagyu beef. Ready all Instagram handles for the Spring in Tokyo cocktail, a frothy, flower-topped sipper of lemongrass shochu, matcha and egg white.

KYU Miami in Wynwood Chef Michael Lewis Steven Haigh
Cauliflower from KYU Miami in the Wynwood neighborhood. (Photo: courtesy of KYU)

KYU
Plan well in advance when trying to reserve a table at this popular Wynwood destination, where chef Michael Lewis delivers cuisine inspired by his travels and the yakinikus of Japan. As such, expect several from-the-grill specialties, along with locally sourced produce and new-style sashimi. Come with a group, or at the very least, a sizable appetite — favorites like duck breast burnt ends and wagyu beef brisket come in generous portions. Those seeking less meat-centric fare will find it in go-tos like the Thai coconut creamed spinach or roasted cauliflower — a hearty, charred serving that’s plated atop zippy shishito vinaigrette. A cocktail pairing is in place for curious imbibers, or go à la carte with the Tom KYU Gai, a spirited take on Tom Kha Gai soup with lemongrass-infused gin, coconut milk, scallion syrup, and cilantro foam.

Lobster Bar Sea Grille
One step inside of this luxe Miami Beach restaurant is bound to transport diners to another time and place — likely Grand Central Oyster Bar in the 1920s, thanks to the dramatic coming together of glittering white tiles, vaulted ceilings and jazz age-inspired lighting fixtures. It all serves as the setting to serious seafood, prime steaks and over-the-top entrees for two (think jumbo lobster tail and whole fish options). The chili lobster (whole steamed lobster with chili butter sauce) is a signature from chef Arturo Paz, as is the Mediterranean octopus, perfectly tender and carefully seasoned in a medley of Santorini capers and Greek olives. Post-dinner, burn it all off down the street at Mango’s, where seasoned dance instructors lead salsa classes nightly.

Makoto
Chef Makoto Okuwa spent years training with Iron Chef Morimoto before eventually opening this Bal Harbour sushi fixture, where he puts his own updated spin on traditional Japanese cuisine. That means fun options like chicken noodle ramen, Japanese risotto and short rib yaki noodles, along with starters like sautéed air spinach with garlic and chili or a grilled tuna “pizza” with tomato, red onion and cilantro. The maki is just as exciting — a lobster roll brims with ginger pickled jicama, asparagus and avocado, while a vegan rendition (the “Vegan Stephen”) melds together tempura zucchini, kanpyo squash, and roasted red pepper. The kitchen’s prowess for winning flavor combinations extends to the dessert menu, where a fondant chocolate cake is filled with molten yuzu and met with saketini espuma and vanilla ice cream rolled in crackly rice crackers.

Le Zoo
James Beard award-winning restaurateur Stephen Starr and designer Shawn Hausmann (Chateau Marmont, The Standard) are behind this lively all-day eatery, which is conveniently situated within the luxe Bal Harbour shopping center. Chef Julian Baker focuses on French-Mediterranean flavors for an extensive menu, which features an array of traditional hors d’oeuvres (salmon tartare, escargot, onion soup gratine) and entrées (trout amandine, moules frites, bouillabaisse), along with plenty of crowd-pleasing fare like pizzas and pastas. A round of oysters to start is always a good idea, as is saving room for dessert. The banana split (with chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry ice cream) is as classic — and as decadent — as they come.

Where to Drink

1-800-Lucky
Those looking for a one-stop-shop of eats, drinks and super chill vibes will find it all here in a Wynwood mixed used space housing everything from a vinyl records shop to Korean karaoke. Eight Asian cuisine concepts feature the likes of ramen, dim sum and sushi, while a full bar features fun sips like sake juice boxes and frozen beer topped with Kirin foam. Try to check it out on Fridays, when one of the biggest house DJs in the biz — Oscar G — hosts Rice + Beats, a collective DJ set featuring several of his friends.

Sweet Liberty
This month saw the passing of this South Beach bar’s head bartender and co-founder John Lermayer — but the venue has plans to continue to spin out the same high-quality cocktails that earned it several impressive accolades in the past year alone (including a title of “Best New American Cocktail Bar” and “Best American High-Volume Cocktail Bar” at Tales of the Cocktail, along with a #27 spot on the World’s Best Bar List). The menu here is at once approachable and adventurous: A piña colada is doctored up with coffee beans and sweet sherry while a Mai Tai gets respun as a “Rye Tai” with Jamaican rum, overproof rye whiskey and passionfruit bitters. Visit for daily happy hour, when oysters are $.95 a pop and select cocktails (think Moscow Mules and Aperol Spritzs) can be had for just $5.

salmon nashi from Juvia in Miami.
Salmon nashi from Juvia.

Juvia
Head to this 10,000-square-foot rooftop for globally inspired plates and epic views of the Miami skyline. Scottish salmon nashi with truffle oil and micro arugula is delicate but memorable — enjoy at least one order before moving on to more substantial fare like the Australian rack of lamb or sake soy–marinated Chilean sea bass. Try them with ingredient-driven twists on traditional cocktails, such as the Juvia Gin and Tonic (with umeshu and shiso) or the Elderflower Mule (with St. Germain and lemongrass). Arrive as the sun goes down to take advantage of pristine views — and prices. The restaurant’s sunset menu special features $11 cocktails until Daylight Savings rolls around.

Cantina La 20
This two-story restaurant offers views of Biscayne Bay and Brickell Key, along with one of the largest selections of high-end tequilas and mezcals in the country. Enjoy them in an array of handcrafted drams, such as the Mariachi Loco (with Avíon Silver Tequila, 1800 Coconut Tequila, cucumber and pineapple) or the Mezclarita (with Montelobos Mezcal, passionfruit and egg white). Try them alongside the kitchen team’s Latin flavors, found in plates like pork chop al pastor, crab meat tacos, and octopus carnitas.

Where to Stay

Mandarin Oriental
This five-star Brickell property boasts 20 stories of luxuriously outfitted rooms and suites, all of which provide epic views of either the Miami skyline or the Biscayne Bay and Atlantic Ocean. Guests can head straight away to the 20,000-square-foot waterfront beach for an afternoon of sunbathing before taking advantage of the spa, a tri-level sanctuary where the treatments are inspired by Chinese, Balinese and Thai traditions. Opt for the Oriental Essence, a 50-minute massage designed to relieve neck and shoulder tension with the property’s signature Quintessence oil. Post-R&R it’s time to refuel, and there’s no better place to do so than at La Mar, where executive chef Diego Oka serves up Asian-Peruvian fare by way of dishes like zesty cebiches, freshly grilled anticuchos and tangy tiraditos.

Delano South Beach
Every day seems like a celebration at this splashy South Beach property — just take one spin around the pool, where a fleet of “Amenity Angels” circulate on the hour with decadent fixings like chocolate-covered strawberries and bites of tequila-soaked pineapple. It’s all the more reason to hang a while longer here (as if the lush palm trees, plush daybeds and cozy cabanas weren’t enough). Once dinner time rolls around, head inside for a reservation at Leynia, where chef Jose Icardi offers traditional Argentine cuisine fused with Japanese influences, as evidenced in options like chicken empanadas, Patagonian lamb, and a medley of sushi and sashimi. When booking, be sure to inquire about the Suite Life by SBE, a new luxury program offering guests access to five-star experiences during their stay, such as private airport pick-ups and gifts from a variety of top-tier brands.

The Ritz-Carlton Bal Harbour
All 99 rooms found within this Bal Harbour property are designed as suites, complete with semi-private elevators, floor-to-ceiling windows, and Instagram-worthy bathrooms (where a free-standing tub and oversized shower overlook the Atlantic). Once guests have a moment to take it all in, they can head down to the hotel’s sprawling beach and European-edged pool, where a series of private cabanas (and personal hot tubs) await. Keep that self-care coming with a stop at Exhale, the property’s onsite spa that features award-winning therapies and a variety of yoga and HIIT classes. A trip to onsite eatery Artisan Beach House is a must — especially during brunch, when mains like duck hash, Mediterranean quinoa and poached egg shakshuka take center stage.

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Hennessy Announces Latest Limited Edition Bottle Artist, Vhils http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/20/182953/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/20/182953/#respond Wed, 20 Jun 2018 19:10:38 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=182953 The Cognac company Hennessy has announced its annual artist collaboration for its limited edition bottle, which will be available in July. The urban artist Alexandre Farto, better known as Vhils, has created a highly textural design that hints at his multimedia, street-influenced process. Vhils, who became known for his tag around his native Portugal and […]

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ALEXANDRE FARTO aka VHILS
Artist Vhils is the latest to design a label for Hennessy’s Very Special Limited Bottle series.

The Cognac company Hennessy has announced its annual artist collaboration for its limited edition bottle, which will be available in July. The urban artist Alexandre Farto, better known as Vhils, has created a highly textural design that hints at his multimedia, street-influenced process. Vhils, who became known for his tag around his native Portugal and then beyond, has become an in-demand artist who uses chiseling, etching and other unusual techniques to create his murals and works.

Vhils Hennessy limited edition bottle

Obviously, it’s not advisable to chisel into a bottle of Cognac, so Vhils’ Hennessy bottle and gift box merely evoke his techniques; still, the effect is stunning. The bottles, which go on sale for $32 (retail for 750 ml) nationwide in the U.S. in July, will surely sell out quickly, so we suggest to start stalking your neighborhood liquor store.

Past Hennessy “Very Special Limited Edition Bottle” artists include KAWS, Shepard Fairey, Futura and Jon One. Like many of the artists in the series, Vhils mixes street artist cred with more formal art education; he studied at several London arts schools, and still splits his time between England and Portugal.

A release about the collaboration with Vhils states, “As the guest artist for Hennessy Very Special Limited Edition 2018, Vhils selected hallmarks from the Hennessy archives, such as the Three Star emblem, and reproduced Cognac’s amber hues through experimentation with paper, heat and acid. In keeping with his monumental works, he created a composite portrait that taps into the essence of Hennessy’s identity while speaking to each viewer on an individual level.”

For more information, visit Hennessy.com.

 

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Dan Van Rite And Dan Jacobs Talk Milwaukee On Food Republic Today http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/20/dan-van-rite-and-dan-jacobs-talk-chinese-cuisine-on-food-republic-today/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/20/dan-van-rite-and-dan-jacobs-talk-chinese-cuisine-on-food-republic-today/#respond Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:22:00 +0000 http://foodrepublic.com/?p=182925 Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please rate the podcast and leave comments! Subscribe: Apple | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | Soundcloud Today, two of Milwaukee’s most exciting young chefs stop in for a chat. Dan Van Rite and Dan Jacobs are two culinary grads who put aside their classical training to start a restaurant that […]

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Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please rate the podcast and leave comments!

Subscribe: Apple | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | Soundcloud

Today, two of Milwaukee’s most exciting young chefs stop in for a chat. Dan Van Rite and Dan Jacobs are two culinary grads who put aside their classical training to start a restaurant that they thought the city needed. Dandan channels the two chefs’ love of Americanized Chinese food in a vibrant setting with a hip-hop soundtrack, while playing off their name — dandan noodles is on the menu, of course. Inside the restaurant, there’s a nod to their fine dining past at EsterEv, a weekend-only prix-fixe pop-up of sorts. (The two have gone on to cue up Fauntleroy, a new French spot set to open next month.) The dynamic Dan duo fill us in on Milwaukee’s dining scene, and get emotional talking about Jacobs’ diagnosis with the rare Kennedy’s disease, and what it means for his future. First, host Richard Martin and producer Katie Guhl discuss Anthony Bourdain’s death and legacy. We wrap up in Post Bites with another edition of Bad Yelp Review of Good Restaurants.

FR_PodcastLogo

Food Republic Today is hosted by our Editorial Director, Richard Martin and produced by Zero Point Zero Production. Our producer is Katie Guhl with assistance from Tiffany Do. The episode features music by Ghostly International artists including Michna, whose “Metal Baile Joint” is the theme song.

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World’s 50 Best Restaurants Announces 2018 Winners http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/19/worlds-50-best-restaurants-announces-2018-winners/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/19/worlds-50-best-restaurants-announces-2018-winners/#respond Tue, 19 Jun 2018 20:34:37 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=182944 The World’s 50 Best Restaurants List was announced today in Bilbao, Spain. Eleven Madison Park in NYC claimed the top spot last year but fell to #4 this year, as Massimo Bottura claimed the top spot for his Osteria Francescana for the second time, while the top 3 were all European entries. Here are the 2018 World’s 50 Best […]

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The World’s 50 Best Restaurants List was announced today in Bilbao, Spain. Eleven Madison Park in NYC claimed the top spot last year but fell to #4 this year, as Massimo Bottura claimed the top spot for his Osteria Francescana for the second time, while the top 3 were all European entries. Here are the 2018 World’s 50 Best Restaurants:

  1. Osteria Francescana (Modena, Italy)
    2. El Celler De Can Roca (Girona, Spain)
    3. Mirazur (Menton, France)
    4. Eleven Madison Park (New York City)
    5. Gaggan (Bangkok, Thailand)
    6. Central (Lima, Peru)
    7. Maido (Lima, Peru)
    8. Arpège (Paris, France)
    9. Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
    10. Asador Etxebarri (Atxondo, Spain)
    11. Quintonil (Mexico City, Mexico)
    12. Blue Hill at Stone Barns (Pocantico Hills, NY)
    13. Pujol (Mexico City, Mexico)
    14.Steirereck (Vienna, Austria)
    15. White Rabbit (Moscow, Russia)
    16. Piazza Duomo (Alba, Italy)
    17. Den (Tokyo, Japan)
    18. Disfrutar (Barcelona, Spain)
    19. Geranium (Copenhagen, Denmark)
    20. Attica (Melbourne, Australia)
    21. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athenée (Paris, France)
    22. Narisawa (Tokyo, Japan)
    23. Le Calandre (Rubano, Italy)
    24. Ultraviolet by Paul Pairet (Shanghai, China)
    25. Cosme (New York, New York)
    26. Le Bernardin (New York, New York)
    27. Boragó (Santiago, Chile)
    28. Odette (Singapore)
    29. Alléno Paris au Pavillon Ledoyen (Paris, France)
    30. D.O.M. (Sao Paolo, Brazil)
    31. Arzak (San Sebastian, Spain)
    32. Tickets (Barcelona, Spain)
    33. The Clove Club (London, England)
    34. Alinea (Chicago, Illinois)
    35. Maaemo (Oslo, Norway)
    36. Reale (Castel Di Sangro, Italy)
    37. Tim Raue (Berlin, Germany)
    38. Lyle’s (London, England)
    39. Astrid y Gaston (Lima, Peru)
    40. Septime (Paris, France)
    41. Nihanryori RyuGin (Tokyo, Japan)
    42. The Ledbury (London, England)
    43. Azurmendi (Larrabetzu, Spain)
    44. Mikla (Istanbul, Turkey)
    45. Dinner By Heston Blumenthal (London, England)
    46. Saison (San Francisco, California)
    47. Schloss Schauenstein (Fürstenau, Switzerland)
    48. Hisa Franko (Kobarid, Slovenia)
    49. Nahm (Bangkok, Thailand)
    50. The Test Kitchen (Cape Town, South Africa)

One to watch award: SingleThread (Sonoma, California)

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Skift Table Announces Speakers For Its Inaugural Restaurants Forum http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/19/skift-table-announces-speakers-inaugural-restaurants-forum/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/19/skift-table-announces-speakers-inaugural-restaurants-forum/#respond Tue, 19 Jun 2018 13:00:24 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=182934 There are hundreds, maybe even thousands of food festivals around the U.S. each year, yet there are surprisingly few industry-centric events that convene chefs, restaurateurs, general managers, human resources directors and other personnel to discuss topics affecting the restaurant world. The annual Welcome conference, spearheaded by Eleven Madison Park’s Will Guidara, has held several sold-out events […]

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redzepiskift
Rene Redzepi (left) discusses why he closed the original version of Noma at last year’s Skift Travel Forum with Skift co-founder Rafat Ali. The company is launching a restaurants forum this September.

There are hundreds, maybe even thousands of food festivals around the U.S. each year, yet there are surprisingly few industry-centric events that convene chefs, restaurateurs, general managers, human resources directors and other personnel to discuss topics affecting the restaurant world. The annual Welcome conference, spearheaded by Eleven Madison Park’s Will Guidara, has held several sold-out events in New York City in recent years, and now, the trade publisher and events company Skift has announced its inaugural Skift Restaurants Forum in New York City on September 24, 2018.

The company, well respected for its insights around the travel industry and its Skift Global Forum events, recently launched a daily Skift Table newsletter that covers hot-button issues in the restaurant world, from sexual harassment allegations against prominent chefs to how raising the minimum wage will change pricing and wait staff pay. Now, it’s adding a restaurant-focused forum to go along with it.

Skift Table announced its initial talent list a few days ago, including Christa Quarles, Chief Executive Officer of OpenTable; Stan Chia, Chief Operating Officer of Grubhub; Ben Liebmann, COO of Noma; Eric Martino, COO of Thinkfoodgroup; Angela Dimayuga, Creative Director of Food and Culture at Standard Hotels; Niki Russ Federman and Josh Russ Tupper, co-proprietors of Russ & Daughters; Stephanie Izard, chef/partner of Girl & the Goat, Little Goat, Duck Duck Goat, and Goat Group Catering; Jeffrey Lefcourt, founder and managing partner of Corner Table; Noah Glass, CEO of Olo; Kevin Boehm, co-founder of Boka Restaurant Group; Lydia Tenaglia, Chief Creative Officer of ZPZ (Food Republic’s parent company). There will be more speakers added in coming weeks.

“Skift Restaurants Forum offers unique insights into what shapes today’s restaurant industry,” Jason Clampet, General Manager of Skift Table, says in a statement. “Our preview last year featuring Noma’s Rene Redzepi and Union Square Hospitality’s Danny Meyer was just a taste of what’s to come at this year’s event. With so much innovation occurring in the culinary sector — from operations and marketing to technology and the guest experience — Skift Restaurants Forum offers an exciting venue for inspirational and aspirational idea-sharing.”

More information and tickets can be found on the Skift Restaurants Forum website.

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Plant-Based Travel: Destinations For Vegans And Vegetarians http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/18/plant-based-travel-destinations-vegans-vegetarians/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/18/plant-based-travel-destinations-vegans-vegetarians/#respond Mon, 18 Jun 2018 14:42:32 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=182929 Eating meat-free while on the road used to be one of the most frustrating parts of traveling for vegans and vegetarians. Not anymore. As more and more people opt for plant-based and vegetarian diets around the globe, travelers now have enticing choices of where to dine while visiting different cities and countries, and in many […]

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Eating meat-free while on the road used to be one of the most frustrating parts of traveling for vegans and vegetarians. Not anymore. As more and more people opt for plant-based and vegetarian diets around the globe, travelers now have enticing choices of where to dine while visiting different cities and countries, and in many cases, what’s on the plate can serve as an introduction to an unfamiliar culture.

Over the past few years, the journalist Selene Nelson has traveled the world and filed reports for Food Republic on where to find delicious plant-based meals from places as far afield as Cuba, London and Vietnam. Along the way, she’s tasted banana blossom salad in Bangkok, mezcal mushroom tacos in New York City and a tempura tofu burger in New Zealand.

In other words, she’s toured the world eating at the best plant-based and vegetarian restaurants, and has written dining guides for the following 15 places. Check them out to help choose your next vacation destination:

And if that’s not enough, check out our podcast interview with plant-based podcasters/authors/personalities Rich Roll and Julie Piatt, who discuss their new Italian cookbook, The Plantpower Way: Italia, on Food Republic Today:

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These Are America’s 100 Best Wine Restaurants According To Wine Enthusiast http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/15/100-best-wine-restaurants/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/15/100-best-wine-restaurants/#respond Fri, 15 Jun 2018 13:00:42 +0000 http://foodrepublic.com/?p=182918 Wine Enthusiast‘s annual 100 Best Wine Restaurants list went live online this week. The list celebrates restaurants with outstanding wine programs and welcomed 59 new restaurants on the list. As for those who have made it on the esteemed list four or more times, they’ve been inducted into the new Restaurant Hall of Fame. Familiar names […]

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Wine Enthusiast‘s annual 100 Best Wine Restaurants list went live online this week. The list celebrates restaurants with outstanding wine programs and welcomed 59 new restaurants on the list. As for those who have made it on the esteemed list four or more times, they’ve been inducted into the new Restaurant Hall of Fame.

Familiar names such Alinea in Chicago, Coi in San Francisco and Fish & Game in Hudson, NY made the cut. Newly opened Korean steakhouse, Cote in New York, was ushered in on the list. The full feature of the 100 restaurants will appear in Wine Enthusiast‘s August issue, which hits newsstands on June 25. Additionally, the magazine highlighted Mexico’s best 10 wine restaurants in an online feature.

Check out the full list of restaurants by alphabetical order below. Cheers!

  1. 610 Magnolia, KY
  2. Adega, CA
  3. Agern, NY
  4. Alinea, IL
  5. Alter, Fl
  6. Anxo, DC
  7. Atelier Crenn/Bar Crenn, CA
  8. Aureole, NV
  9. Ava Gene’s, OR
  10. Barolo Grill, CO
  11. Beholder, IN
  12. Bellemore, IL
  13. Bisl Food, MT
  14. The Boiler Room Restaurant, NE
  15. Bullion, TX
  16. Cabernet Grill, TX
  17. Californios, CA
  18. Castagna, OR
  19. The Charter Oak, CA
  20. Coi, CA
  21. Compère Lapin, LA
  22. Compline Wine Bar and Restaurant, CA
  23. Cote, NY
  24. Cúrate, NC
  25. Dirt Candy, NY
  26. Doc Martin’s, NM
  27. Drifter’s Wife, ME
  28. FIG, SC
  29. The Firehouse, CA
  30. Fish & Game, NY
  31. Fleurie, VA
  32. Flora Bar, NY
  33. Flora Street Cafe, TX
  34. Foreign Cinema, CA
  35. The Forge, FL
  36. The Four Horseman, NY
  37. The French Room, TX
  38. Gabriel Kreuther, NY
  39. Galley and Garden, AL
  40. Geordie’s, AZ
  41. Glitretind Restaurant, UT
  42. The Grill/The Pool, NY
  43. Hen of the Wood, VT
  44. Indian Accent, NY
  45. Iron Gate, DC
  46. Jamestown Fish, RI
  47. Jiko-The Cooking Place, FL
  48. The Lark, CA
  49. Le Coucou, NY
  50. Le Pigeon, OR
  51. The Love, PA
  52. Loyal Nine, MA
  53. Marcel, GA
  54. Maude, CA
  55. McCrady’s, SC
  56. Menton, MA
  57. Meritage, MN
  58. Métier, DC
  59. The Modern, NY
  60. The Morris, CA
  61. n/naka, CA
  62. Ninety Acres at Natirar, NJ
  63. One Eleven, AR
  64. One Fifth, TX
  65. Oriole, IL
  66. Otway, NY
  67. Ousia, NY
  68. Pago, UT
  69. Pappas Bros. Steakhouse, TX
  70. Peck’s Arcade, NY
  71. Picasso at Bellagio Resort & Casino, NV
  72. Pico at the Los Alamos General Store, CA
  73. The Plumed Horse Restaurant, CA
  74. Prime + Proper, MI
  75. The Progress, CA
  76. The Purple Pig, IL
  77. Redbird, CA
  78. Reeds American Table, MO
  79. Restaurant Guy Savoy, NV
  80. RN74, WA
  81. Rustic Canyon, CA
  82. Sardella, MO
  83. The Sardine Factory, CA
  84. Scampi, NY
  85. Shagbark, VA
  86. Spoon and Stable, MN
  87. STRIPSTEAK Waikiki, HI
  88. Studio, CA
  89. Supra, DC
  90. Taberna de Haro, MA
  91. Tagliata, MD
  92. Tavernetta, CO
  93. Torc, CA
  94. Trattoria Stella, MI
  95. Valette, CA
  96. Vetri Cucina, PA
  97. The Whelk, CT
  98. The Wildflower Café, OH
  99. Willows Inn on Lummi Island, WA
  100. Xochi, TX

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Check Out These Beautiful Illustrations From Paris Picnic Club http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/14/paris-picnic-club-illustrations/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/14/paris-picnic-club-illustrations/#respond Thu, 14 Jun 2018 13:00:10 +0000 http://foodrepublic.com/?p=182890 Chefs Shaheen Peerbhai and Jennie Levitt brought Parisian friends together every Friday for a year with a park-friendly delicious spread of tartines, salads, fried chicken, pasta dishes, desserts and more. From there they opened pop-up restaurants, hosted picnics with 80 guests and now have written Paris Picnic Club. The book is full of all their best […]

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Chefs Shaheen Peerbhai and Jennie Levitt brought Parisian friends together every Friday for a year with a park-friendly delicious spread of tartines, salads, fried chicken, pasta dishes, desserts and more. From there they opened pop-up restaurants, hosted picnics with 80 guests and now have written Paris Picnic Club. The book is full of all their best recipes and is fully illustrated by Levitt. Below, we picked out some of the most beautiful of Levitt’s watercolors featuring a full cheese and fruit spread, salmon gravlax, creamy potato-y aligot, briny oysters and tartines.

Reprinted with permission from Paris Picnic Club: More Than 100 Recipes To Savor And Share

Aligot
Aligot
Oysters (2)
Oysters
image on page XV
Picnic spread
88938_ENDS_FRONT-1
Tartines
Salmon (1)
Salmon

 

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All The Burger News We Could Fit Between Two Buns http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/13/burger-news/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/13/burger-news/#respond Wed, 13 Jun 2018 13:00:26 +0000 http://foodrepublic.com/?p=182900 Would you eat a burger from a chain known for its flapjacks? What happens when a beloved chain is shipped a bad case of buns? How are plant-based burgers performing in meat-crazed America? Find out all this burger news below. IHOb For one week, the International House of Pancakes teased its name change to IHOb, and […]

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burger news
(Photo: jilbean3/Flickr.)All the juicy burger news in one place.

Would you eat a burger from a chain known for its flapjacks? What happens when a beloved chain is shipped a bad case of buns? How are plant-based burgers performing in meat-crazed America? Find out all this burger news below.

IHOb

For one week, the International House of Pancakes teased its name change to IHOb, and the Internet went into a tizzy wondering what the mysterious B could stand for. Guesses included bananas, breakfast, bacon, bitcoin, breakdancing and more. Then it was revealed on Monday that the breakfast chain would in fact start serving burgers, and that the name change was temporary. Can the worlds of burgers and pancakes intermix? The Boston Globe reports that you can in fact sub your fries for a side of flapjacks. God bless America.

Protein Style

For those who aren’t well versed on In-N-Out’s “secret menu,” the Protein Style burger is your regular burger wrapped in lettuce. No buns in site. Unfortunately for Texans, all In-N-Out locations in the Lone Star State had to close doors on Monday and Tuesday due to a case of bad buns. Executive Vice President Bob Lang, Jr. released a statement on Monday, saying the buns shipped to Texan locations did not meet quality standards. He also said there are “no food safety concerns.” New buns were supposed to arrive to the state’s seven locations yesterday when the stores planned to reopen, but evidently didn’t. Perhaps Texans should learn to love the Protein Style burger until approved buns are ready to be served.

Impossible Sliders

Since the Impossible Burger’s addition to White Castle’s menu, customers are reportedly enjoying the mini plant-based patties in New York, New Jersey and Chicago. Vice President Jamie Richardson told Forbes that some locations are slinging as many as 300 sliders a day. No word yet on whether or not Hollywood is interested in making a vegan sequel to the Harold and Kumar franchise.

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Steve McHugh Knows More About Beans Than You Do http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/13/steve-mchugh-knows-beans/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/06/13/steve-mchugh-knows-beans/#respond Wed, 13 Jun 2018 12:17:41 +0000 http://foodrepublic.com/?p=182884 Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please rate the podcast and leave comments! Subscribe: Apple | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | Soundcloud Chef Steve McHugh grew up on a Wisconsin farm with six brothers. He went on to become a rising star chef in New Orleans, only to get cancer at a very young age. Then […]

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Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please rate the podcast and leave comments!

Subscribe: Apple | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | Soundcloud

Chef Steve McHugh grew up on a Wisconsin farm with six brothers. He went on to become a rising star chef in New Orleans, only to get cancer at a very young age. Then he beat it. Since moving from New Orleans to San Antonio, McHugh has really honed the flavors of the southwest at his James Beard Award-nominated restaurant Cured. He chats with us about mesquite beans, his incredible mom, San Antonio’s dining scene and what it was like to witness his mentor, John Besh’s, downfall. Comedian Nonye Brown-West joins us again in Post Bites to tell us a story about meatballs.

Further Reading:

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Food Republic Today is hosted by our Editorial Director, Richard Martin and produced by Zero Point Zero Production. Our producer is Katie Guhl with assistance from Tiffany Do. The episode features music by Ghostly International artists including Michna, whose “Metal Baile Joint” is the theme song.

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