Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com Where Food, Drink & Culture Unite Thu, 27 Jul 2017 20:13:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 100 Fragrant and Flavorful Reasons To Love Rosé http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/27/100-reasons-love-rose/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/27/100-reasons-love-rose/#respond Thu, 27 Jul 2017 17:00:12 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172072 Whether you’re newly obsessed with rosé wine or a decades-old devotee, you’re going to love Rosé All Day, award-winning food and wine writer Katherine Cole’s new book devoted to the ultimate pink drink. An essential primer and master class all in one, this delightfully rose-colored tome is packed with information, charts, illustrations, stories and more. If […]

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reasons to love rose
(signe_karin/Flickr) 100 reasons to love rosé? We’ve got a million!

Whether you’re newly obsessed with rosé wine or a decades-old devotee, you’re going to love Rosé All Day, award-winning food and wine writer Katherine Cole’s new book devoted to the ultimate pink drink. An essential primer and master class all in one, this delightfully rose-colored tome is packed with information, charts, illustrations, stories and more.

If you’ve ever needed to defend your affinity for rosé, look no further than this handy list of 100 flavor notes found in the wine. This is by no means an exhaustive list — what are some other flavors you’ve discovered?

love rose

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What Is Mosto Cotto? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/27/what-is-mosto-cotto/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/27/what-is-mosto-cotto/#respond Thu, 27 Jul 2017 15:00:42 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172174 If you’re a fan of wine, grapes, vinegar or sweet and tangy condiments, there’s an essential Italian ingredient you’re about to welcome into your pantry. What is mosto cotto? It’s a delicious addition to your salad, fruit, ice cream or even glass of water, and a delightful by-product of the winemaking process. Mosto cotto, also called vino […]

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If you’re a fan of wine, grapes, vinegar or sweet and tangy condiments, there’s an essential Italian ingredient you’re about to welcome into your pantry. What is mosto cotto? It’s a delicious addition to your salad, fruit, ice cream or even glass of water, and a delightful by-product of the winemaking process.

Mosto cotto, also called vino cotto or saba, is made by cooking the liquid that results from initial whole grape pressings — seeds, skin, stems and all. By reducing it down to a syrup, the complex flavors that give wine its unique, distinctive notes are amplified. The resulting product is a sweet, tangy addition to savory dishes as well as desserts.

In Italian cuisine, you’ll find mosto cotto in many applications. Whether spooned onto panna cotta or simple fruit desserts, drizzled over hard aged cheese or, as mentioned previously, stirred into a glass of water for a natural thirst-quencher that’s delicious during the hotter months.

What happens if you let mosto cotto sit in its aging barrels? Why, balsamic vinegar, of course! Bottled before it turns sour, mosto cotto is the sweet to balsamic’s pungent.

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The Latest Developments In Space Food Include Fresh Coffee http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/27/developments-space-food/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/27/developments-space-food/#respond Thu, 27 Jul 2017 13:00:47 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172160 Astronauts can now enjoy food other than dehydrated ice cream, flour tortillas and vacuum-sealed meals. Freshly brewed coffee will be boosting morale, thanks to the advancement in space food. And if that’s how you’re going to start your morning, you’ll also need some toast. Here are a few new items that may revolutionize space travel. Space Bread German scientists […]

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Astronauts can now enjoy food other than dehydrated ice cream, flour tortillas and vacuum-sealed meals. Freshly brewed coffee will be boosting morale, thanks to the advancement in space food. And if that’s how you’re going to start your morning, you’ll also need some toast. Here are a few new items that may revolutionize space travel.

space food
German scientists are working on a device that’ll bake bread in space. (Photo: M Dreibelbis/Flickr.)

Space Bread

German scientists are working on a way to break bread with aliens. At least, Sebastian Marcu, founder of Bake In Space, is. NPR reports that Marcu is on a mission to build an oven suitable for space travel.

There are a number of reasons why baking bread, or bread in general, isn’t ideal fare on a spaceship. According to NPR, the oven would have to operate in a way that forgoes preheating because opening a hot oven on a ship would release a heat bubble that could cause burns. Baking bread at a low temperature would dry out the loaf, making crumbs inevitable, which would be a hazard in themselves. Space crumbs float every which way, and drifting into an electrical panel could start a fire.

Marcu’s device is expected to be ready for the International Space Station by June 2018.

Space Dumplings

Chinese scientists are growing wheat and vegetables under trial conditions. According to QZ, a four-person team from Beihang University is living in tight quarters for six months to simulate life in space. They’ve been tasked with being as self-sustaining as possible, growing carrots, potatoes, wheat, onions and strings beans, and even using their fecal waste as a fertilizer. (QZ reports that the stuff is fermented before it’s used for crops.)

The researchers have successfully harvested the produce and even milled flour out of the wheat to make noodles and dumplings. As for protein, mealworms are chock full of them, and also provide crops with carbon dioxide.

Elysian Brewing has made a special batch of their flagship IPA with actual space dust. (Photo courtesy of Elysian Brewing.)
Elysian Brewing has made a special batch of their flagship IPA with actual space dust. (Photo courtesy of Elysian Brewing.)

Space Beer

Down here on Earth, Seattle’s Elysian Brewing is infusing space dust in their flagship IPA. The brewing company worked with Jon Larsen, a cosmic dust researcher and author of In Search Of Stardust, to upgrade their Space Dust IPA using the real deal. The beer was originally named after Galaxy hops, which they experimented with during the brewing process. They decided to brew with another variety, but kept the name.

Elysian is auctioning off one six-pack of Space Dust IPA with the galactic ingredient at Agora Gallery in New York City on August 8. Tickets are available here. All proceeds will go to benefit New York Cares, a volunteer-led community support organization.

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How Italy’s New Labeling Rule May Affect Canadian Exports http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/italys-labeling-canadian-exports/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/italys-labeling-canadian-exports/#respond Wed, 26 Jul 2017 18:00:18 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172143 In an effort to spotlight local farmers, Italy has issued a new rule stating that pasta and rice products sold in the country must be labeled with country of origin. According to Reuters, labels will start their transition next year and will go through a two-year trial process. Labels will state where wheat is grown and milled, […]

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In an effort to spotlight local farmers, Italy has issued a new rule stating that pasta and rice products sold in the country must be labeled with country of origin.

According to Reuters, labels will start their transition next year and will go through a two-year trial process. Labels will state where wheat is grown and milled, while rice labels will state where the crop is grown, packaged and treated.

Reuters reports that Canada is a major exporter of durum, pasta’s main ingredient, to Italy (and the world’s largest exporter overall) and the push for more local wheat could hurt their market. Canada exports an estimated $197 million USD worth of wheat to Italy, the country’s second-largest export market, every year. In the 2016-17 harvest, Canada exported 676,000 tons of durum to Italy.

While there’s no evidence that the new rule has affected trade, the Canadian government is taking precautionary steps and reviewing the decree under the World Trade Organization as well as the free trade agreement between the European Union and Canada.

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Beyond Sangria: 14 Ways To Add Wine To A Cocktail http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/10-summer-cocktails/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/10-summer-cocktails/#respond Wed, 26 Jul 2017 17:00:06 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=171631 When temperatures rise, we reach for something to cool us off, and our favorite vino is never far from reach. While you may be used to drinking wine on its own, it’s far more versatile than you think. We spoke to 12 of our favorite sommeliers and mixologists about how they like to use wine […]

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ribera_main

When temperatures rise, we reach for something to cool us off, and our favorite vino is never far from reach. While you may be used to drinking wine on its own, it’s far more versatile than you think. We spoke to 12 of our favorite sommeliers and mixologists about how they like to use wine in summer cocktails, and the results will impress you. In sangria, spritzes, and even in a new-wave Tiki iteration, they’ve proven that wine is the ingredient to have on hand this summer. Your glasses and shaker will thank you.

Brahm Callahan, Master Sommelier, Beverage Director Himmel Hospitality Group (Boston)
@Brealsomm
@DineatHarvest

Cocktail: The Kina Kir

This wine-based cocktail from Harvest is crisp and refreshing — the perfect summer cocktail. Also, it isn’t as boozy as some classic cocktails, which means you can drink it all day long. Because of the restrained use of spirits and its acidity, it’s also extremely versatile with food, and especially great with salads, vegetables, and all things summer.

  • 2 ounces Lillet rose
  • 1/2 ounce Ketel One Vodka
  • 3/4 ounce St. Germain
  • 2 ounces of sparkling Rueda (such as Vina Cantosan Brut NV)
  1. Combine Lillet, Ketel One and St. Germain over ice.
  2. Give it a good shake for approximately 30 seconds.
  3. Strain, pour into 8-ounce coupe glass and add sparkling wine.
(imcountingufoz/Flickr)
(imcountingufoz/Flickr)

Miguel Lancha, Cocktail Innovator, Think Food Group/ Jaleo by José Andrés (Washington D.C./ Las Vegas)
@jaleobyjose
Sangría Roja

Cocktail: Jaleo by José Andrés

Yield: 1 32-ounce pitcher

Particularly the fizzy versions of sangria are so refreshing, and are a perfect blend of fruity and spiced. It’s such a festive drink that you can share and its lower ABV makes it good to have more than one. What else is better than to enjoy sangria with friends in the summer? – Miguel Lancha

  • 13 ounces Valdehermoso Joven 2016, Ribera del Duero (about half of a 750ml bottle)
  • 9 ounces Sangría Base (see recipe below)
  • 10 ounces soda water
  • To garnish: 4 each lemon wheels, mint sprigs, orange peels, and berries
  1. Combine wine, sangría base, and seltzer in a pitcher.
  2. Fill 4 glasses with cubed ice, and pour sangría into each.
  3. Place lemon, mint, orange peel, and berry on top. Serve immediately.

Sangría Base

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/4 ounces simple syrup
  • 4 3/4 ounces Sangría Syrup (see recipe below)
  • 1 ounce sherry brandy (like Lustau Solera Reserva Brandy)
  • 1 ounce dry gin (like Fords Gin)
  1. Combine all ingredients and mix well.
  2. Set aside until making the sangría.

Sangría Syrup
(Makes 1 quart)

  • 3 cups orange juice
  • 3⁄4 cup lemon juice
  • 3.5 ounces sugar
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 5 juniper berries
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 bunch fresh mint, destemmed
  • Zest from 1 orange
  • Zest from 1 lemon
  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring constantly.
  2. Once the sugar has dissolved, remove from the heat and allow to cool.
  3. Strain through a fine sieve and store in sealed container until ready to use.

summer cocktails

Matt Whitney, Wine Director, Eastern Standard (Boston)
@MWhitney27
@ESKDBoston

Cocktail: La Cucaracha

La Cucaracha is a staple in our program, and is our go-to for anybody craving sangria. It has a nice balance of fruit, spice and savory notes, while taking on a great texture from the Tempranillo. It’s refreshing, and a great riff on sangria for the hot season!

  • 1 ounce Finca Villacreces Ribera del Duero 2009
  • 1 ounce Tequila Arette Blanco
  • 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 3/4 split of housemade cardamom syrup and housemade cinnamon syrup (or try Cardamom Clove simple syrup by Royal Rose, and Torani Cinnamon Syrup)
  • Ginger beer
  1. Mix all ingredients, except the ginger beer, in a mixing glass.
  2. Add ice and shake 5-10 seconds.
  3. Strain over fresh ice into a highball glass.
  4. Top with ginger beer, and garnish with a lime wedge.

Yusef Austin, Founder, The Cocktail Architect
@thecocktailarchitect

Cocktail: Bacchus’ Punch (serves 6-8) 

I love how the herbal nuances of the Benedictine mixes with this wine for a summer punch. We incorporate Spanish summer fruits to round out the wine, especially once it hits ice and dilutes a bit. I imagine looking onto the terrain and sipping this punch when the sun starts to set. Pair it with a lovely olive oil, grilled bread, olives and chorizo. Yum!

Ingredients:

  • 2 750 ml bottles Emilio Moro Ribero Del Duero Tempranillo
  • 1 750 ml bottle Benedictine
  • 15 ounces honey syrup
  • 1/2 quart each of strawberries, peaches and cherries
  • 1 large mint sprig
  • Large colorful painted ceramic bowl
  1. De-seed the fruit and muddle in a punch bowl. 
  2. Add wine, Benedictine and honey and stir thoroughly.
  3. Let sit for the afternoon at room temperature so the fruit blends into the alcohol.
  4. Ladle the punch into a large wine glass over crushed ice and garnish with a few mint leaves.

Chris Tanghe, Master Sommelier, Chief Instructor GuildSomm (Seattle)
@CMTanghe

Mine is a riff on a classic, a drink that I immediately think of during the summer : the Aperol Spritz. It’s perfect on a boat, though a porch, patio or picnic will do. This drink is a crowd-pleaser and even though it’s a “bitter” drink, it still has quite a bit of sweetness, so everyone likes it. My version uses different ingredients that go for a true bitterness, but there is enough sugar to keep it in balance. A bonus is that it’s low-proof, so you can have a few without getting too loopy!

Cocktail: Aperol Spritz

Ingredients:

  • 1 part Gran Classico bitter
  • 1 part Cocchi Vermouth de Torino
  • 2 dashes Scrappy’s Grapefruit bitters
  • 2 parts sparkling Rueda — I like Brut Nature Mocén
  • Splash soda
  • Large grapefruit twist garnish
  1. Fill a large wine glass halfway with ice.
  2. Build the cocktail in the glass with the Gran Classico, Cocchi and Scrappy’s first, then add the sparkling Rueda and soda.
  3. Give a gentle stir; the first ingredients are a bit denser than the wine, and otherwise will stay at the bottom.
  4. Garnish with grapefruit twist — make sure to squeeze the oil out of the peel — and you’re good to go.
summer cocktails
(ozmafan/Flickr(

Dana Gaiser, Advanced Sommelier, On-Premise Key Accounts Director Lauber Imports (New York)
@Richeboured

Cocktail: Castilla Bramble

I love this cocktail in the summer when I’m looking for something a little lighter on the booze. I created it one balmy evening and drink it at home all the time now. It has a great Tiki feel to it, though it doesn’t use rum. I suggest using a Ribera del Duero with some American oak, which lends a bit of coconut and spice to enhance that tropical feel.

Ingredients:

  • 2 ounces Vina Sastre Ribera del Duero 2015
  • 1 1/2 ounces Massenez Creme de Pomme Verte
  • 1.2 ounce Massenez Creme de Griotte
  • 1/2 ounce lemon juice
  • 2 dashes Reagan’s orange bitters
  • 1 ounce soda
  • Luxardo maraschino cherries or brandied cherries for garnish
  1. Shake all ingredients, except the soda, with ice.
  2. Strain over crushed ice in a hurricane glass and add soda.
  3. Squeeze a lemon twist over the top, rub it on the rim of the glass and discard.
  4. Garnish with cherries.

JP Fetherston, Head Bartender, Drink Company / Columbia Room (Washington D.C.)
@jpfethers
@columbiaroom

Cocktail: The Shoreline Cup

This is a cocktail from our current ocean-themed menu for Summer 2017. The idea was to make a wine-based cocktail, that was light, lower ABV and refreshing, but that emphasized strong marine notes. We wanted a lot salinity from the sea beans, samphire and celery to put one in the mind of sipping an aperitif near the ocean.

Ingredients:

  • 2 ounces Verdejo-based Rueda such as the Finca Montepedroso Verdejo
  • 3/4 ounce sea bean and samphire-infused vodka
  • 1/4 ounce celery juice
  • 1/4 ounce honey syrup
  • 1 dash Linder Farms wild chamomile vinegar
  • 1 dash grapefruit bitters
  • 1/2 ounce filtered water
  1. Build in a wine glass over ice.
  2. Garnish with a sea bean stalk and celery leaf. 
(mccun934/Flickr)
(mccun934/Flickr)

Ashley Santoro, Wine Director, The Standard (New York)
@Ashley_Santoro

This cocktail was a complete accident. I had three goals: successfully incorporate Chareau aloe liqueur; keep the ABV slightly lower; and create something refreshing. Chareau has beautiful texture and botanical notes, but can be somewhat challenging to work with. Because the wine has such a dominant role, I went with the Jose Pariente Verdejo to add citrus and fennel notes, but most importantly, acidity.

Cocktail: Peruvian Summer

Ingredients:

  • 1 ounce Macchu Pisco
  • 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce Chareau
  • 1/2 ounce Giffard Pamplemousse
  • 3/4 ounce Jose Pariente Verdejo
  1. Add all ingredients to shaker with ice.
  2. Shake and strain into coupe.

Josh Lit, Advanced Sommelier The MODERN NYC (New York)
@Josh_Lit
@TheModernNYC

Cocktail: The Castilla

Refreshing: this is the most important word in the dictionary of summer cocktails. If you can incorporate freshness, acidity and a touch of sweetness, you will have a fantastic summer cocktail. The following cocktail is Chef Francis Mallmann’s recipe — with a Spanish twist! Sauvignon Blanc is an aromatic grape variety, and I love how Bodegas Menade preserves the freshness of the variety in their late harvest style. Make sure to stir the cocktail to incorporate all of the ingredients. Happy drinking!

Ingredients:

  • 3 ounces  Bodegas Menade Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc from Rueda
  • 2 ounces orange juice
  • 1 ounce Campari
  1. Grab a highball glass and add crushed ice.
  2. Add ingredients and stir. Enjoy!

Gin Tonic Matador Room

John Lowe, Sommelier & Marija Mijic, Sommelier, Matador Room by Jean Georges @ the Miami Beach EDITION (Miami)
@yo_tambiennn
@MatadorRoom

We wanted to bridge the gap between a sangria and a G&T for the hot summer, as you want a lower ABV drink that’s refreshing with lots of ice! Using the Ribera Tempranillo gives the drink nice depth and pairs wonderfully with orange.

Cocktail: Peñafiel G&T

Ingredients:

  • 2 ounces Alkkemist Gin
  • 1/2 ounce Jack Rudy tonic syrup
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 6 drops orange bitters
  • 6 ounces soda water
  • 1 ounce Tempranillo (Ribera del Duero)
  • Orange for garnish
  1. Fill large stemmed Burgundy glass with large ice cubes.
  2. Pour in gin, tonic syrup, bitters and lime juice, then stir vigorously in the glass.
  3. Add soda water and gently stir to combine.
  4. Layer the Tempranillo on top of the cocktail.
  5. Garnish with fresh orange slice.
(curious-food-lover/Flickr)
(curious-food-lover/Flickr)

Jacob Grier, Bartender, Wayfinder Beer & Cocktail Consultant, Liquidity Preference (Portland)
@jacobgrier
@wayfinderbeer

Cocktail: New Amsterdam Sour

I created this drink for an event at Metrovino, a wine bar where I used to work in Portland. It’s a variation on the New York Sour, using genever in place of whiskey. The maltiness and botanicals are great for a summer sour, and the lighter color of the genever really makes the contrast with the red wine pop. 

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 ounces Bols Genever
  • 3/4 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup 
  • Ribera del Duero Tempranillo such as 2012 Hacienda Monasterio 750ml
  1. Shake the genever, lemon juice, and simple syrup with ice and strain into an ice-filled rocks glass.
  2. Insert straw and float approximately half an ounce of red wine on top.
  3. Using crushed ice to fill the glass is a nice touch but not strictly necessary. 
(90859240/Flickr)
(90859240/Flickr)

Joseph Ferragamo, Food & Beverage Director, Intercontinental Mark Hopkins San Francisco (San Francisco)

@intercontinental

Cocktail: The Top of the Mark Collins

Below is one drink we offer at our location, we try to rotate specialty drinks every few months. Both of these are classics and solid choices for summer.  Myself and Jaap Boelens, Food and Beverage Operation Manager come up with the drinks. For the Top of the Mark Collins  we put the drink together to try to get more people to try Hendrick’s Gin. To soften it up, gin has a very set flavor profile and I think it’s a love/hate when it comes to that taste. Cutting with some wine seemed the way to go.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 ounces Hendricks Gin
  • 1 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce house made simple syrup
  • 1 1/2 ounces Rueda Verdejo, like the Shaya Verdejo
  • Club soda
  1. Shake all ingredients except the club soda and strain over ice into a cocktail glass.
  2. Pour club soda to fill to the top.
  3. Garnish with an orange peel.

Zak Doy, Bar Manager of Rush Lane  (Toronto)
@to_imbibe
@rushlaneco

Cocktail: Rueda Sour

It’s been a beautiful summer. What’s better than a super-refreshing, low-ABV sour on a sunny day? This cocktail was inspired by the bright flavors of rhubarb and orange, brightened with fresh citrus notes. The Verdejo completes the flavor delivery with a deep finish that really rounds out and balances the whole drink.  

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 ounces Aperol
  • 1/2 ounce Cointreau
  • 1 ounce lemon juice
  • 3/4 ounce simple syrup
  • Egg white/aquafaba (vegan option)
  • Rueda Verdejo, such as Marques de Riscal Verdejo
  1. Shake all ingredients except the Verdejo
  2. Strain over ice into a cocktail glass.
  3. Serve up with a float of still Verdejo on top.

Raul Abrantes, Director of Outlets, The Stinger Cocktail Bar & Kitchen By Todd English @ The Intercontinental New York Times Square
@thestingernyc

Cocktail: The Stinger NY Sour

This is a twist on a classic whiskey sour. At the Stinger we only use premium spirits and fresh juices along with our own housemade honey that we harvest from our rooftop beehives. It is refreshing, has a great balance, and with a very nice buzz!

  • 1 1/2 ounces Bulleit bourbon
  • 1/2 ounce Ilegal Joven Mezcal
  • 3/4 ounce fresh-squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce honey syrup
  • Splash of Ribera del Duero Tempranillo such as Condado de Haza Ribera del Duero Tinto 2014
  1. Place an egg white in a shaker and dry shake vigorously to create a foam.
  2. add all ingredients plus ice, and shake vigorously again.
  3. Pour on the rocks and drizzle with Tempranillo.
  4. Use a stirrer to lightly create a design with the foam and the Tempranillo.
  5. No garnish needed. Enjoy.

Ribera y Rueda Logo

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12 Light and Simple Summer Chicken Recipes http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/simple-summer-chicken-recipes/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/simple-summer-chicken-recipes/#respond Wed, 26 Jul 2017 14:00:35 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172050 If you’re looking to get a light, healthy dinner on the table fast, we’ve got simple 12 summer chicken recipes to inspire a little creativity. Bust out the skewers or enlist the help of lemon, herbs, sea salt and other best friends of chicken. Spin it Asian, roast in the oven or enlist the help […]

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If you’re looking to get a light, healthy dinner on the table fast, we’ve got simple 12 summer chicken recipes to inspire a little creativity. Bust out the skewers or enlist the help of lemon, herbs, sea salt and other best friends of chicken. Spin it Asian, roast in the oven or enlist the help of your trusty grill — whatever your fancy, there’s a way to do it right here.

Recipe: Quick Chicken And Snap Pea Skewers

I love making these skewers as soon as my snap peas are at their peak. They’re quick to assemble and pretty enough to serve when company comes. Marinating the chicken in the mint and parsley pesto ensures it is as juicy as it is flavorful. I love to prep them the night before so they marinate overnight in the refrigerator which makes the meal even easier when it’s time to cook. Once broiled, the snap peas are tender and the onion is caramelized and sweetened to perfection.

Easiest Weeknight Meals
Master Ina Garten’s skillet-roasted lemon chicken and delight everyone at the table.

Recipe: Ina Garten’s Skillet-Roasted Lemon Chicken

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve made this! I have the butcher butterfly the chicken, so all I do is grind the thyme, fennel seeds, salt and pepper, mix it with olive oil, and brush it on the chicken. When the lemon slices are roasted and caramelized, you can eat them with the chicken.

thaibasilchicken
Take this easy Thai basil chicken from cutting board to table in no time flat. (Photo: Kris Lindenmuth.)

Recipe: Easy Thai Basil Chicken

It’s as easy as adding ingredients to a pan in the right order. Lay out all your ingredients and get the rice cooking before you start, as this dish comes together very quickly. With a little order of operations (and some stirring) you’ll have a delicious, healthy dinner on the table in about 30 minutes.

Chicken Onigirazu
Onigirazu is the best Japanese sandwich you’ve never had. Dig in!

Recipe: Sriracha Mayo And Chicken Onigirazu

The Japanese can’t get enough of these seaweed and rice ‘sandwiches.’ Fill them with anything you fancy — the combinations are endless.

Burmese chicken with mint
Burma Superstar is one of the standout Asian cookbooks of the year. Cook it tonight!

Recipe: Burmese Chicken With Mint

Those who like laap will love this Burmese-Chinese version of the herby Thai minced meat dish. Here, minced chicken is stir-fried with ground cumin and mustard seeds, ginger, garlic and a spoonful of sambal oelek. Whole cloves of garlic are mixed in for texture, but they are fried ahead of time to reduce the pungency of eating them raw. Use the smaller cloves found on the inside of a head of garlic or slice large cloves in half. You can turn this into a veg­etarian dish by dicing up a block of firm tofu, letting it drain on paper towels for a few minutes, and then stir-frying the tofu pieces in place of the chicken.

chicken with apricots in riesling
This chicken with apricots in Riesling is a simple, hearty recipe packed with perfectly balanced flavor.

Recipe: Chicken With Apricots In Riesling

If you feel like eating meat but time is tight, throw some chicken thighs in the oven. This is one of the quickest and easiest dishes to please a hungry crowd of family or friends, in which case just double the amounts below. And if there are fewer people at the table, add a little chutney and some arugula leaves to the cold leftovers, and stuff everything into a sandwich.

chicken satay salad
Thai street food meets chopped salad in this delicious, healthy dish.

Recipe: A Lean, Green, Nutty Chicken Satay Salad

As crunchy, creamy, nutty, chicken satay salad goes, this one has a lot to offer. Based on one of my favorite Asian street foods, chicken satay, it’s got all the best bits — tender chicken in an aromatic peanut sauce, along with a simple crunchy salad. Mix and match the vegetables as you wish, but do choose ones that have a bite to them.

Sumac And Oregano Wings
These charred sumac and oregano wings will fly off your party platter.

Recipe: Tangy Sumac And Oregano Wings

Tavuk kanat, or chicken wings, are barbecued and served all over Turkey, expertly marinated in fragrant herbs and spices. I have used a traditional Turkish marinade made with Turkish pepper flakes, sumac, cumin, oregano, and yogurt. The yogurt helps to tenderize the meat and bind all the flavors together. These charred chicken wings are ideal served with orange and celeriac salad and plenty of bread to mop up all the juices.

tarragon chicken
Make this simple, flavorful tarragon chicken with sherry for an easy weekday meal or impressive dinner for a crowd.

Recipe: Tarragon Chicken With Pearl Couscous

This very subtle dish is perfect for midweek suppers when you want something warming but fairly quick to prep. By cooking the couscous in the same pan as the chicken, you can guarantee that no flavor is lost. I adore giant wholewheat couscous for its bite and slightly nutty flavor, but you can of course use the regular stuff if preferred.

grilled chicken and onion skewers
Fire up the grill and skewer some chicken — it’s Japanese yakitori for dinner tonight!

Recipe: Grilled Chicken And Onion Skewers

This simple recipe is good with salt (shio yakitori) or with sauce (tare yakitori). You can prepare half the recipe with the salt and half the recipe with the sauce to have the best of both worlds.

zaatarchicken
Roast chicken seasoned with citrus zest and za’atar beats out the garlic, lemon and herb rendition every time.

Recipe: Citrus And Za’atar Chicken

Roast chicken is the ultimate comfort food, and I have been known to conjure up many different versions over the years. While I love a classic salt- and pepper-seasoned bird, I’m pretty adventurous and unafraid of throwing the contents of my spice racks and pantry at a chicken to liven it up when the mood suits. Za’atar is a staple spice blend in my house — it’s so versatile, it goes with everything, and the fragrance of citrus zest really lifts this flavorsome dish. Try it: It’s a winner. And don’t waste the leftover fruits — juice them and add water and sugar to sweeten for a refreshing drink.

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The Promising State Of Omakase In New York City http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/the-promising-state-of-sushi-in-new-york-city/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/26/the-promising-state-of-sushi-in-new-york-city/#respond Wed, 26 Jul 2017 13:00:50 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172094 Long gone are the days when “going for sushi” in New York City meant sitting down for a meal consisting solely of California and spicy tuna rolls. Nowadays, those types of delicacies can be found at your local pharmacy! [Editor’s Note: Stay away. Far, far away.] The Big Apple has come a long way in […]

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Long gone are the days when “going for sushi” in New York City meant sitting down for a meal consisting solely of California and spicy tuna rolls. Nowadays, those types of delicacies can be found at your local pharmacy! [Editor’s Note: Stay away. Far, far away.]

The Big Apple has come a long way in the vast, complex world of sushi. Walk just a few blocks and you’re more than likely to come across a neighborhood joint dishing out set plates of nigiri, sashimi and rolls. Follow restaurant news and there will almost always be a piece covering the opening of a new venue that touts some sort of novel concept. It’s been a couple of years since the term omakase went mainstream and the city hasn’t looked back. Diners are willing to place their complete trust in sushi chefs, allowing him or her to fully dictate the contents of the meal, often at the cost of hundreds of dollars. Imitation crab seems like a distant memory.

With top-quality sushi places thriving and business showing no signs of slowing down, we jotted down some observations from recent meals. Here’s what we’ve noticed between bites of shima aji and o-toro.

omakase
A colorful sign advertising a 30-minute, $50 omakase. Definitely a new arrival in the NYC sushi world.
  1. Affordable omakase

As mentioned, there has been an unprecedented amount of omakase-only spots opening around the city. It’s worth noting, however, that newer establishments have lowered the entry-level price tags attached to first-wave spots that opened a couple of years ago. Full meals at NYC’s outpost of Los Angeles mini-chain Sugarfish, chef David Bouhadana’s Sushi by Bou in Gansevoort Market, and Brooklyn original Sushi Katsuei go for $40, $50 and $57, respectively. While it’s nice that the popularity of omakase is on the rise, it’s most comforting to see that multiple restaurants are offering this luxury at attainable prices.

omakase
Former Sushi Yasuda head chef Tatsuya Sekiguchi just opened Omakase Room by Tatsu.
  1. Chef interaction

What is one main benefit of omakase restaurants featuring only sushi-bar seating? A front-row seat and prime conversation opportunity with the head chef. Forgive us for speaking generally here, but Japanese sushi chefs are enthused to share tokens from their breadth of knowledge with diners, while answering any and all questions and eagerly keeping open a dialogue throughout the meal. Diners have progressed from merely wanting to try uni (sea urchin) to wanting to know from where it was sourced and being able to distinguish the taste and texture differences between multiple variations.

omakase
O-toro is considered a jewel of an omakase meal. But from where was it sourced?
  1. Global ingredient sourcing

Speaking of the differences between various types of uni, let’s take a minute to chat about just how many types we’ve come across during our recent Japanese dining adventures. Over the course of a mere month, we’ve enjoyed generous globs of urchin from Hokkaido (Japan), Santa Barbara, Maine and Chile. We’re tempted to rank our preference in that exact order, but encourage you to seek them out for yourself. In the tuna realm, we’ve sampled fish from Japan, the northeastern U.S., Italy, Turkey, Mexico and Spain. This last location is especially popular these days, with more and more acclaimed chefs choosing to order Spanish tuna. Our guess (from both a taste and a practical perspective) is that the differences with its Japanese counterpart are minimal, while it’s easier and less costly to import.

omakase
At the new Sushi Ishikawa, uni from Hokkaido is topped with Italian black truffle and lies atop a squash blossom from the U.S.
  1. Toppings galore!

An omakase meal derives much of its charm from its simplicity: Pieces are most commonly served one-by-one, with a gentle brush of soy sauce and dab of wasabi acting as their only accompaniments. While New York favorites Sushi of Gari and Sushi Seki have become known for the chefs’ experimenting with colorful, flavorful toppings, recent omakase openings have found inventive ways to toe the line between traditional and modern preparations. While you may not encounter toppings that mask the fish’s flavor, be on the lookout for small, nuanced touches, such as sea salt, shiso, a squeeze of lemon, a light sear from a blowtorch or a couple drops of a citrusy, yuzu-based sauce. These additions allow the quality of the fish to shine through while imparting subtle flavor pairings.

omakase
The simple, traditional sushi bar at Sushi Katsuei in NYC’s West Village.
  1. No-frills environments

For many Americans, the word omakase conjures up images from the 2011 hit documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi. It was this portrayal of a bare-bones restaurant located in a Tokyo train station that many first came to associate with such a meal type. A plethora of NYC’s top omakase spots follow suit in keeping things as understated as possible: From a décor perspective, you can expect a wooden L-shaped sushi bar, perhaps some exposed brick and little else. This ambiance plays to the diner’s ideal of a tranquil experience, while allowing the restaurant to spend markedly less on such expenses as prime rent locations, interior design and even labor costs (it’s not uncommon for smaller venues to employ no more than 4-5 people total during dining hours). That’s what we call a win-win!

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Is Okja This Generation’s The Jungle? http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/okja-new-jungle/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/okja-new-jungle/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2017 17:00:16 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=171997 Warning: This article contains spoilers for Okja. How far does a movie or book have to go before causing a visceral, sometimes life-changing reaction? How many Inconvenient Truths and Cowspiracys are we going to sit through before dramatic change to our food systems and carbon footprints are enacted? For the most part, headlines for Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s (Snowpiercer, The […]

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Warning: This article contains spoilers for Okja.

How far does a movie or book have to go before causing a visceral, sometimes life-changing reaction? How many Inconvenient Truths and Cowspiracys are we going to sit through before dramatic change to our food systems and carbon footprints are enacted?

For the most part, headlines for Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s (SnowpiercerThe Host) new Okja, distributed by Netflix, repeat the concept that the film has the convincing power to make meat lovers join the animal cruelty-minded vegan movement. Eater writes, “Will ‘Okja’ Really Turn The World Vegan?” Foodbeast states, “Netflix’s Revolutionary New Film ‘Okja’ Is Causing People To Go Vegan.” Film blog Film School Rejects pens, “‘Okja’ Made My Carnivore Girlfriend Go Vegetarian.'”

The film, which originally premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, tells the story of the Mirando Corporation’s, led by Lucy Mirando’s attempt to solve the world’s hunger crises by genetically modifying a miracle pig that’ll feed more people, create less waste, leave a smaller carbon footprint and most importantly, taste great. For marketing purposes, the Mirando Corporation, whose former CEO was known for his involvement in creating Napalm — which has driven the company into harsh lights — hands off super piglets to farmers around the globe in a competition to raise the best super pig. What the good people in this fictional world don’t know is that the super pig is the product of years of failed experimentation on animals. Cue the Peta-like organization, or the Animal Liberation Front, as they’re called in the movie.

Fast forward ten years and a Korean farmer, Heebong, has won the contest and raised the biggest and healthiest super pig and named her Okja. Okja is essentially pasture-raised and runs around freely in the mountainsides outside of Seoul. Mija, Heebong’s granddaughter, has made Okja her best friend for the past ten years. When Mirando officials come to collect Okja for pageantry and then slaughter, Mija makes it her mission to save Okja. The super pig is shipped from Korea to America, where Mirando’s facilities play home to mutated failed experiments and an already existing farm of super pigs. Scenes of the Mirando super pig factory mimic those of mass-factory farming facilities. The super pigs are lined up to enter the kill room where an employee shoots the pig. The carcass is then processed, different parts turned into small, tidy packages of store-ready meat.

According to IndieWire, Bong and his producer, Dooho Choi, visited a meat processing plant in Colorado for research. The pair temporarily practiced veganism as a result.

The first time anything made me a vegetarian was when my 10th grade English teacher assigned Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle for us to delve into and dissect. For those unfamiliar with the controversial 1906 novel, Sinclair writes about an Eastern European family that spends nearly all its wealth to immigrate to America. They find themselves in Chicago, working in meat processing facilities, which were then notorious for being riddled with rats, bacteria and all-around unsanitary conditions. They worked long hours for little pay and most of them suffered dismal ends. For instance, one overworked and underfed worker falls asleep somewhere in the factory. He gets eaten alive by rats.

The book sparked not only a vegetarian movement within my class, but — perhaps, more importantly — a crackdown on Chicago’s meat packing factories, which eventually led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration. My own stint as a pescatarian lasted only two years, partially due to recurring dreams of chicken wings and mostly in part to educating myself on better and humane farming practices. What the book, Okja and dozens of other movies like Soylent Green (1973), do however, is remind audiences of the horror that is the current food system. What these forms of media should do — and in the case of The Jungle, did do — is to inspire people to get involved in local food ways and educate children about the origins of food.

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At Brooklyn’s Summerhill, Shooting Holes Through The Delicate Gentrification Issue http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/summerhill-brooklyn-controversial/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/summerhill-brooklyn-controversial/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2017 15:00:17 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172018 It started out as just some neighborhood buzz, yet another new beach-y drinking hole where the likes of King Tai (opened 2015) and Super Power (opened 2016) pour drinks and pull pints in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights, where talk of gentrification is common, and where I happen to live. This past Saturday, protesters gathered on the corner of Nostrand and […]

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It started out as just some neighborhood buzz, yet another new beach-y drinking hole where the likes of King Tai (opened 2015) and Super Power (opened 2016) pour drinks and pull pints in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights, where talk of gentrification is common, and where I happen to live.

This past Saturday, protesters gathered on the corner of Nostrand and St. Mark’s Avenues, where new bar Summerhill opened its doors in June. Gothamist reported last week that owner Becca Brennan promoted in a press release that the bar features a “bullet hole-ridden wall.” She also told the local news website that she planned to serve 40-ounce bottles of rosé in paper bags. Speakers at Saturday’s open forum accused Brennan of glorifying violence and exploiting racist stereotypes for profit, called for a boycott and presented a list of demands, including removing the bullet holes, all while Summerhill was open and serving customers.

Summerhill appeared out of nowhere. I first happened upon the bar with enormous open windows on Nostrand Avenue on my way home from a weekend trip with my girlfriend in mid-June. The place was packed, so we decided to pop in. The woman behind the bar, who we later learned was Brennan, told us it was a “soft-soft opening.” Cash only, food still in the works but the bar was fully functioning. The interior was nondescript except for one unfinished, cracked wall — which was meant to appear shot up by bullets, a dubious nod to the neighborhood’s crime-filled past. In the dark, the wall just looked like it needed a paint job. I figured Brennan was going for that played-out, insensitive juxtaposition of Brooklyn’s crime-heavy history and influx of gentrifying residents and patrons; just another new bar with snacks in a reformed insert-non-food-place-here.

Crown Heights is historically known to be densely populated by African-Americans and West Indian immigrants. In the last several years, gentrification has taken hold just as it has in many other Brooklyn neighborhoods. In the two years that I’ve lived in Crown Heights, I’ve seen drastic changes in the area — long-abandoned storefronts turned into shiny new, hip businesses, and young professionals moving into charming brownstones. Being a better neighbor and part of the community in the gentrifying area is always a concern. It doesn’t help when a new business owner like Brennan moves in and shows disrespect, inadvertently or not, for what she says is “cheekiness.”

As for Summerhill, it’s business as usual, though hopefully with more sensitivity to neighborhood concerns in the wake of last weekend’s protests. Brennan issued an apology yesterday on Instagram, writing “The restaurant décor is not intended to make light of any aspect of Crown Heights, or its history. I’ve reached out to the Crown Heights Tenant Union and the organizers of the forum on Saturday in hopes of setting a meeting to discuss the concerns that were brought up and I look forward to having the opportunity to meet with them.”

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Pickle Company The Real Dill Achieves Zero-Waste Status http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/real-dill-zero-waste-status/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/real-dill-zero-waste-status/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2017 14:00:48 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=172019 Denver-based pickle company The Real Dill has what many companies only dream about: zero-waste status. According to Fast Company, The Real Dill, founded by friends Justin Park and Tyler DuBois, is operating as close to 100% efficiency as you can get. What’s their secret? Sheer insistence. Their original goal was simply to make great artisanal pickles […]

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Denver-based pickle company The Real Dill has what many companies only dream about: zero-waste status. According to Fast Company, The Real Dill, founded by friends Justin Park and Tyler DuBois, is operating as close to 100% efficiency as you can get. What’s their secret? Sheer insistence.

Their original goal was simply to make great artisanal pickles to sell at local farmers markets. While the jumping-off point was already primed for sustainability — you can famously pickle anything — the duo found themselves discarding more organic scraps than they were comfortable with. They created a Bloody Mary mix that incorporated the leftover pickle brine, which quickly became a fan favorite, but still needed to find a home for the vegetable scraps.

Park, who had previously worked in non-profit development, reached out to Denver non-profit Re:Vision, which advocates for community gardens and improved food systems in the city’s low-income Westwood neighborhood. Through a combined effort, Re:Vision’s composting program was able to take on more than 500 pounds of The Real Dill’s vegetable and herb scraps every week.

pickles

Ready to support these champions of food waste? A quick peek at their online store reveals a full-on growler of brine-spiked Bloody Mary mix (hey, we said it was popular), imaginative pickle flavors like honey jalapeño dill and Thai chili ginger and much more. And here’s an at-home food conservation tip from the pros: You know those herbs and seasonings left floating in the jar when all the pickles are gone? Save ’em, they make killer deviled egg garnishes! And as luck would have it, deviled eggs pair beautifully with cucumber brine-spiked Bloody Marys.

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8 Restaurants You Can’t Miss in Indianapolis http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/8-restaurants-you-cant-miss-in-indianapolis/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2017/07/25/8-restaurants-you-cant-miss-in-indianapolis/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2017 13:00:49 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=171968 Indianapolis might hold bragging rights to more steakhouses per capita than any other city in the country, but there’s much more to eating and drinking well here than hunks of beef. After the city hosted the Super Bowl in 2012, interest and development in the downtown area boomed, resulting in a cool crop of new […]

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Indianapolis might hold bragging rights to more steakhouses per capita than any other city in the country, but there’s much more to eating and drinking well here than hunks of beef. After the city hosted the Super Bowl in 2012, interest and development in the downtown area boomed, resulting in a cool crop of new restaurants and bars. And since the city is surrounded by a bounty of farms, eating farm-to-table comes quite naturally. So here, 8 buzzy restaurants you can’t miss during your next visit to Indy.

Katie Chang
Owners Chris and Ally Benedyk have created a low-key, daytime nook with great energy, and with food that’s wildly addictive. (Photo credit: Katie Chang)

Love Handle
The design is lean and spare. The menu is written daily on a chalkboard. And it’s located in a quiet pocket of town. But once you walk in, you’ll see what the buzz is all about. Owners Chris and Ally Benedyk have created a low-key, daytime nook with great energy, and with food that’s wildly addictive. The famed biscuits and gravy are spiked with spicy collards, and the original sandwich creations are belly-busting. (The Tame Tunnel features a beef and beet tartare with grilled broccolini.) Benedyk especially loves working with less popular cuts of meat, so you’ll see a lot of tongue and heart on his menu. Even better? The prices are incredibly forgiving. 2829 E 10th St.; 317-430-5004; facebook.com/LoveHandleIndy

VisitIndy.com
The vibes match the warm and charming service, making Tinker Street the kind of restaurant every neighborhood needs. (Photo credit: VisitIndy.com)

Tinker Street
What was formerly a real estate office is now home to one of the city’s most beloved restaurants. Chef Braedon Kellner’s globe-trotting menu is thoroughly elegant but approachable — think steam buns with shiitakes and kale, heirloom tomatoes with fried pickles, and gulf shrimp with grits — and the wine list curated by sommelier Lindsay Slone focuses on equally exciting, but lesser-known labels. The vibes match the warm and charming service, making this the kind of restaurant every neighborhood needs: a place you’ll come back to over and over again. 402 E 16th St.; 317-925-5000; tinkerstreetindy.com

Bluebeard
Bluebird, a popular restaurant in the historic Holy Rosary neighborhood, is known for partnering with local farms and purveyors since opening in 2012. (Photo credit: VisitIndy.com)

Bluebeard
Co-owned by Abbi Adams, Tom Battista and Eddie Battista, this popular restaurant in the historic Holy Rosary neighborhood in known for partnering with local farms and purveyors since opening in 2012. Fittingly, the food is seasonally driven, yet deeply hearty. The lunchtime sandwich offerings — all of which are served on Amelia’s bread baked next door — are especially satisfying. (The egg salad, which is studded with capers and pickled red onions, then heaped into a flaky croissant, shouldn’t be missed.) Curious about the library theme? Bluebeard’s name takes inspiration from a best-selling novel by the city’s most beloved author, Kurt Vonnegut. 653 Virginia Ave.; bluebeardindy.com

VisitIndy.com
Believe it or not: it’s the spicy shrimp cocktail that’s the best-selling item at St Elmo Steak House. (Photo credit: VisitIndy.com)

St Elmo Steak House
A city institution, this beloved steakhouse was opened by Joe Stahr in 1902. Today, it still maintains a delightful old-school vibe that appeals to locals and tourists alike. Servers clad in black tuxedos juggle trays of perfectly charred steaks and bracing ice-cold martinis while weaving their way through the bustling dining room. And as strange as it might sound, the steakhouse’s claim to fame is its shrimp cocktail. The jumbo shrimp are plump and sweet, but it’s the cocktail sauce loaded with freshly grated horseradish that packs such a punch. It’s a slow and intense burn, but thoroughly manageable if you like heat. 127 Illinois St.; stelmos.com

Fountain-Square-Pioneer-Thunderbird-031-1
The fried chicken at the lively Thunderbird is especially good. (Photo credit: VisitIndy.com)

Thunderbird
In the Fountain Square neighborhood, you’ll find this wood-cloaked, rollicking bar specializing in seriously spirited cocktails — the Sam Hell, for example, is a woozy blend of two types of Wild Turkey Bourbon and two kinds of bitters — and quality Southern-inspired snacks, including hot chicken biscuits, shrimp étoufée, and succotash. Late night revelers will appreciate that the kitchen’s open late. 1127 Shelby St.; thunderbirdindy.com

Cerulean-26
Be sure to request a seat in the nest at Cerulean. (Photo credit: VisitIndy.com)

Cerulean
Tucked away on the ground floor of The Alexander Hotel, Cerulean sports a chic, design-minded interior with its soft beige palette, oversized paper pendant lights, and most interestingly, an open nest fashioned of birch pieces woven together. (When making a reservation, request at table in the nest.) Chef Alan Sternberg enlists a similar artful and slightly refined approach to his cooking. His summer pappardelle, for example, is tossed with in-season vegetables, pine nuts and a bright arugula pistou — it’s is as easy on the eyes as it is on the palate. 339 S Delaware St.; 317-870-1320; ceruleanrestaurant.com/indianapolis

Fletcher-Place-Milktooth-15
Breakfast rules at Milktooth. (Photo credit: VisitIndy.com)

Milktooth
Instead of rushing through the first meal of the day, why not set aside some time to slow down, catch up with friends and linger over something filling and hearty? That’s exactly the thinking at this casual spot run by Jonathan and Ashley Brooks. Though it’s only open 7 a.m. through 3 p.m. daily, there’s almost always a line, so be prepared to wait. And whether your appetite is light or indulgent, there’s plenty to tuck into, from a vegan ancient grains porridge topped with plum jam and hemp seed to an airy, pull-apart dutch baby pancake made with fresh fruit. 534 Virginia Ave.; 317-986-5131; milktoothindy.com

Vida-003-1
Don’t forget to order the house salad, with greens plucked from the wall garden at Vida. (Photo: VisitIndy.com)

Vida
While most of the buzz about this restaurant in the historic Lockerbie district has been about the famous hydroponic wall of greens there’s much more to eating and drinking well here. Plenty of seating options (in the patio, bar and main dining room) cater to every type of occasion, and you can go à la carte or splurge with the chef’s tasting menu. The housemade charcuterie, which rotates frequently, arrives with sweet and savory accompaniments, and serves as an especially memorable start to the evening — especially with a salad whose leaves were plucked off the wall. 601 E New York St.; 317-420-2323; vida-restaurant.com

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