Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com Where Food, Drink & Culture Unite Sun, 21 Jan 2018 13:41:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.2 Tide Pod Challenge, Movies, Super Bowl: 10 Hot Topics On Food Republic http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/tide-pod-challenge-movies-super-bowl/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/tide-pod-challenge-movies-super-bowl/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 18:00:41 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178478 Film and television award season is upon us, which got us thinking about all the movies we saw in 2017. We also got excited for the documentaries and television coming in the near future. We’re also getting on some winter travel: New York wasn’t cold enough for us so we checked out some of the […]

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Film and television award season is upon us, which got us thinking about all the movies we saw in 2017. We also got excited for the documentaries and television coming in the near future. We’re also getting on some winter travel: New York wasn’t cold enough for us so we checked out some of the finest restaurants in Minneapolis. For an actual escape, we headed down to Oaxaca to learn all about roasting agave for mezcal. We also thought of a million reasons to not do the Tide Pod Challenge, but settled on just 12 snacks to make instead. All that and more on this week’s Hot Topics.

  1. Korea is now home to a very close imitator of In-N-Out, called Cry Cheese Burger.
  2. Japanese carbonara is the fusion dish you’ve always hoped for. Here’s the recipe.
  3. Please don’t participate in the Tide Pod Challenge. Make these 12 snacks instead.
  4. We imagined what the Oscar nominations would be if food was taken into account.
  5. Minneapolis is hosting this year’s Super Bowl. Check out these nine restaurants if you’re in the Twin Cities!
  6. David Chang’s new Netflix series is set to premiere next month.
  7. Ariel Arce is a 30-year-old business owner in Manhattan. Listen to how she does it on this episode of our podcast.
  8. The famous teen chef Flynn McGarry stars in his own documentary that’ll premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.
  9. We took a trip down to Oaxaca, Mexico to learn about mezcal.
  10. Phil Rosenthal chats with us about his newest food show on Food Republic Today.

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National Popcorn Day, Free Dumplings, Cochon555: This Week In Food Events http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/national-popcorn-day-free-dumplings/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/national-popcorn-day-free-dumplings/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 16:00:58 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178469 Happy National Popcorn Day! Find out which movie theater in Brooklyn is celebrating with a fancy bowl. Heading out to the Women’s March tomorrow? There’s a bar is hosting a charity happy hour! Looking to celebrate the Grammy’s return to New York City? Chef JJ Johnson knows exactly the place. All that and more in this […]

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Happy National Popcorn Day! Find out which movie theater in Brooklyn is celebrating with a fancy bowl. Heading out to the Women’s March tomorrow? There’s a bar is hosting a charity happy hour! Looking to celebrate the Grammy’s return to New York City? Chef JJ Johnson knows exactly the place. All that and more in this week’s slew of events.

  • To celebrate today’s food holiday, Brooklyn dine-in theater Nitehawk Cinema is bringing back The Vince popcorn: truffle butter, Sriracha, chipotle, lime and citric salt. The theater is also dishing out Pizza Popcorn that’s topped with pepperoni, oregano, Parmesan and truffle butter.
  • After Saturday’s Women’s March in New York, bar and bakery Butter & Scotch is hosting a Happy Ending Happy Hour to benefit The Sex Workers Project. The bartenders of Butter & Scotch will be serving a special cocktail from which $1 will be donated to the organization. A dollar from every regular cocktail will be donated to Planned Parenthood.
  • Cochon555 returns to New York on Sunday, January 21 at Pig Apple. Competing chefs will whip up their best dishes featuring heritage pig in the name of educating guests about these pigs. The competition lineup includes Marc Murphy, Bryan Hunt, Jonathan Waxman, Matt Abdoo, Fabian Gallardo and more. Judges include Erika Nakamura and Jocelyn Guest, Brad Farmerie, Matthew O’Neill and others. Tickets and more information available here. Proceeds from the event will benefit Piggy Bank, a heritage pig farm currently in the making.
  • The 2018 Grammy’s are back in New York for the first time in 14 years and chef JJ Johnson is celebrating all next week at Spring Place. Make a reservation by emailing RSVP@springplace.com for January 23 through 26 for cocktails, food and Johnson’s specially curated playlist.
  • Yaso Tangbao is opening its first Manhattan location (220 E 42nd St.) on Wednesday, January 24. In honor of the opening, 100 free soup dumplings will be offered for the first 100 customers started at 11 a.m.

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Punch Up Your Steak With Homemade Korean Ssamjang http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/steak-homemade-korean-ssamjang/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/steak-homemade-korean-ssamjang/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 15:00:11 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178442 We know, we know. You were about to say, “Good steak doesn’t need sauce.” But you’d be missing out on an extra tasty, spicy, funky sauce if you didn’t marinate and dress your beef with homemade Korean ssamjang. Our friends at ChefSteps partnered with Portland, Oregon chef Gregory Gourdet on this recipe for sauced-up steak to […]

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We know, we know. You were about to say, “Good steak doesn’t need sauce.” But you’d be missing out on an extra tasty, spicy, funky sauce if you didn’t marinate and dress your beef with homemade Korean ssamjang. Our friends at ChefSteps partnered with Portland, Oregon chef Gregory Gourdet on this recipe for sauced-up steak to make our lettuce wrap dreams come true. The steak can be ready in as little as half an hour, depending on your sous vide settings. With that in mind, the simple recipe is a perfect candidate for weeknight classics.

Ssamjang Steak

2 hours; serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1.4 kilograms ribeye steak (you can also use New York, tenderloin, or T-bone)
  • 150 grams doenjang (fermented soybean paste)
  • 150 grams gochujang (red chili paste)
  • 35 grams green onion, sliced, plus more for garnish
  • 10 grams garlic, minced
  • 33 grams shallots, small diced
  • 35 grams ginger, small diced
  • 50 grams honey
  • 20 grams sesame oil
  • 150 grams rice wine vinegar
  • 35 grams grapeseed oil, plus more for grilling
  • Sesame seeds, as needed

Equipment

  • Sous vide setup
  • Grill

Directions

  1. For a medium-rare steak, we recommend cooking at preheating your Joule or sous vide 129 °F / 54 °C. Your cooking time will be between 30 minutes and about 2 hours (depending on size).
  2. Add all the marinade ingredients (everything but beef and sesame seeds) to a bowl and whisk together until they form a fiery red sauce. This homemade ssamjang is going to do double duty as your marinade and finishing sauce.
  3. Season steak generously with salt and place in the bag. Coat with sauce, reserving some for dipping when you serve. Add your bag to the water with Joule or sous vide to cook.
  4. Get your grill ripping hot. When your steak is finished cooking, remove it from the water and drizzle with grapeseed oil. Transfer steak to the grill and leave it there until the bottom side develops a nice char, then flip and repeat on the other side. Remember, your steak is already cooked, so be careful not to sear for too long.
  5. Transfer steak to a plate or bowl. Garnish with reserved green onion slices and sesame seeds. Serve alongside the reserved sauce for dipping—and with white rice and lettuce wraps if desired.

ChefSteps comprises a team of award-winning chefs, filmmakers, scientists, designers and engineers focused on revolutionizing the way people cook by inspiring creativity and encouraging expertise in the kitchen. You can also get access to all of ChefSteps’ Premium content — including paid classes and dozens of recipes available only to Premium members for a onetime fee of $39. Classes include Sous Vide: Beyond the BasicsFluid GelsFrench Macarons and more!

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Finally, A Home Biogas Converter That Won’t Break The Bank http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/home-biogas-converter/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/19/home-biogas-converter/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 14:00:41 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178464 When it comes to gas for heating your home and cooking, you’re pretty much tied to the utility company. HomeBiogas is a new home biogas converter and digester Kickstarted by 677 backers who pledged nearly half a million dollars to bring the idea of a waste-reducing independent fuel supply into fruition. What’s more, perks included donations to areas in need of steady […]

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When it comes to gas for heating your home and cooking, you’re pretty much tied to the utility company. HomeBiogas is a new home biogas converter and digester Kickstarted by 677 backers who pledged nearly half a million dollars to bring the idea of a waste-reducing independent fuel supply into fruition. What’s more, perks included donations to areas in need of steady cooking and heating gas supplies, in order to help house and feed conflict and climate refugees. 

Check out the HomeBiogas 2.0 in action and decide if it’s time to compost while also cutting the gas line. Metaphorically speaking, of course. The unit sells for $520 and ships this coming spring, right in time for prime gardening season.

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Coming To Netflix: David Chang Gets Ugly Delicious http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/netflix-david-chang/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/netflix-david-chang/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 19:00:37 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178459 David Chang, the man behind Momofuku and subject of the first season of Food Republic parent company Zero Point Zero’s Mind of a Chef, is back on screens. Ready for his new show, Ugly Delicious? Premiering on February 23, the eight-episode series follows Chang as he travels, eats and hangs out with notable food personalities like Jessica Koslow, […]

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David Chang, the man behind Momofuku and subject of the first season of Food Republic parent company Zero Point Zero’s Mind of a Chef, is back on screens. Ready for his new show, Ugly Delicious?

Premiering on February 23, the eight-episode series follows Chang as he travels, eats and hangs out with notable food personalities like Jessica Koslow, Sean Brock, Peter Meehan, Fuchsia Dunlop, Massimo Bottura, Chris Shepherd and actor/comedians like Nick Kroll, Eric Wareheim, Alan Yang and others.

Check out the teaser where comedian Ali Wong reasons why Yelp isn’t the best vehicle for finding the best restaurants below.

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Child Prodigy Chef Flynn McGarry Documentary To Debut At Sundance http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/chef-flynn-mcgarry-documentary/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/chef-flynn-mcgarry-documentary/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 18:00:10 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178425 Flynn McGarry has cooked at some of the country’s top restaurants like Alinea, Alma and Eleven Madison Park, created supper clubs and hosted numerous pop-ups in Los Angeles and New York City all before the age of 17. Now at 19 years old, McGarry’s back in the headlines, this time to star in the documentary Chef Flynn. […]

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Flynn McGarry has cooked at some of the country’s top restaurants like Alinea, Alma and Eleven Madison Park, created supper clubs and hosted numerous pop-ups in Los Angeles and New York City all before the age of 17. Now at 19 years old, McGarry’s back in the headlines, this time to star in the documentary Chef Flynn. The film will open at the Sundance Film Festival on January 23, with subsequent screenings on January 24-25 in Park City, Utah.

The film follows McGarry’s rise from the inside thanks to previously recorded footage from his family. McGarry started cooking before he hit his teens, starting a supper club at the age of 12. He’s since been featured on the cover of The New York Times Magazine and had his New York pop-up, Eureka, reviewed by the likes of Adam Platt and Steve Cuozzo.

Director Cameron Yates, producer Laura Coxson, McGarry and his mother will be attending screenings. For more information and updates, check Sundance’s website. Check out the trailer below.

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Roasting Agave & Eating Tacos: A Oaxacan Adventure With Mezcal Unión http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/roasting-agave-eating-tacos-oaxacan-adventure-mezcal-union/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/roasting-agave-eating-tacos-oaxacan-adventure-mezcal-union/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:00:07 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178364 People talk about Oaxaca like it’s a mystical place. Like on your first night there you’ll experience some hint of magic and it’ll guide your journey and you’ll go home feeling not so much refreshed but changed. Maybe the world will be a little clearer. Maybe you’ll see in the Technicolor of the craft-made spirit […]

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People talk about Oaxaca like it’s a mystical place. Like on your first night there you’ll experience some hint of magic and it’ll guide your journey and you’ll go home feeling not so much refreshed but changed. Maybe the world will be a little clearer. Maybe you’ll see in the Technicolor of the craft-made spirit animals you see street vendors selling in the square outside the Templo de Santo Domingo. Or maybe you actually haven’t managed to leave Oaxaca yet.

Me, I went for the mezcal and to check out the peeling-paint pastel décor and to warm up a bit after a few chilly Brooklyn weeks. I wouldn’t say I had some religious enlightenment due to the trip, but I will say that my limited time in Oaxaca just totally blew me away. (Scroll down for recommendations based on my visit and research.)

The hospitality of my hosts, Mezcal Unión, and their extended family of farmers and like-minded colleagues, made me even more ashamed of my home country’s offhanded dismissal of the Mexican people than I had been before. Led by Alejandro Champion Gutierrez, who everybody just calls Champ, Mezcal Unión is a sort of collective that stretches from Mexico City to palenques (mezcal distilleries) out in the foothills 70 or so kilometers in some direction I didn’t catch, with stops in an around Oaxaca City. It encompasses restaurateurs, agave farmers, DJs, mezcaleria owners, an 8-piece teenaged marching band from out in the desert, chefs, urban farmers, a real estate genius or two, conceptual artists, photographers, human rights attorneys and liquor company executives on resiliency missions, American bartenders, marketing gurus and events experts.

Alejandro Champion Gonzales of Union Mezcal
Alejandro Champion Gutierrez is one of the four founders and co-owners of Unión Mezcal. Friends call him Champ. (Photos: Richard Martin)

Champ is a late-30s guy with a laconic yet charismatic delivery and a knack for addressing a crowd, for explaining the appeal, the mystique of mezcal. One morning, Champ appears in the courtyard of my hotel, Casa Vertiz, sidling in amidst the actual trees and tropical plants and that eerily real-looking fake parrot hanging from a branch in the corner. He leads us to a couple of shuttle vans, the brand’s logo stenciled on the exteriors.

A friend of Champ’s Mexico City crew, who resides in Guadalajara himself, plows through the aisle to the back row and pops the top on a Tecate with clamato juice, a morning pick-me-up to offset the opening night of our trip—a mezcal-drenched affair in the courtyard of Enrique Olvera’s entry into Oaxaca, Criollo, that includes probably the best carnitas tacos I’ve ever tasted. Back in the van, An Austin barman takes a liking to the Tecate concoction, and our new friend dubs it “Baby Jesus.”

An hour later we are still in that van, driving down suitably dusty roads, passing villages whose buildings are made of adobe brick and corrugated metal. It feels more and more remote, until we pass a town, San Baltazar Guelavila, and maneuver through a few more challenging turns—during which I’m lamenting my decision to stare out the window, which involves noticing our proximity to the edge of the precipitous road—and park gently along the bank of a ravine. We’re a group of about 25 or 30 this day, visiting the first farm that Mezcal Unión contracted to start making the spirit.

agave2
The mezcal distilling process begins with burying agave plants in a smoldering pit. Here, two different types of agave plants, espedin and tobala, await their fiery fate.

We wander out of the vans and collectively marvel at the setting: There’s an open-air structure a few hundred feet away, perched on a cropping, with two long tables set for us. There’s a pit with harvested agave plants around it. Off to the side is a winding stream with a rocky bank perfect for sitting and hanging out and smoking cigarettes and talking about Mexico City and Paris and Brooklyn and Chicago and Oakland. All while sipping mezcal or Pacifico beers. In other words, life doesn’t suck.

And it’s about to get even better. We sit for a convivial lunch of croquettes and mezcal. I’m down on one end with three of the owners of Williamsburg’s Loosie Rouge and the guy from Austin, whose mezcaleria is called Clyde, and the girlfriend of one of the Loosie guys. It’s totally casual. Time starts to blur. Champ encourages us to head down to the agave pit. Eventually, he props himself above us, with Don Pedro, the palenque owner, and a longtime farmer by his side. Soon, Champ is telling us the Mezcal Unión story, how he and three friends from various creative fields decided that applying what they’d learned about hospitality and craftsmanship and marketing could allow them to make a great product while helping create viable businesses for farmers in formerly forlorn places.

Listen to Champ talk about Mezcal Unión’s sustainability efforts and more on the Food Republic Today podcast:


It’s the only message-y moment of our journey but nobody minds the sincerity, especially when Champ turns the proverbial mic over to Don Pedro, who talks about how he harvests the agave on the land around us to make his own mezcal, as well as Unión’s, and how the partnership has helped him thrive. Then one of his farmers thanks everyone for coming, and talks, in Spanish, for several minutes. My Spanish-speaking skills are shaky at best, but from what I can make out, he’s meandering around his tale of gushing gratitude; it’s utterly charming.

Then, the gathered crowd is instructed in picking up chunks of agave and throwing them on the smoldering fire. (But first there’s a warning about not touching a certain part of the agave, which can cause skin rashes.) One of the workers arranges the harvested plants, and after a raucous 15 minutes, most of the agave is in the pit; the workers arrange and stack it, then began to stuff the kindling-like cereal in crevices and around the agave before shoveling dirt over the entire production, creating a smoldering mound. It’s a lot more thrilling watching all this than it is to take part in a wine harvest or to blink your way through your 23rd craft brewery tour.

The next item on our itinerary is a hike, and before we begin the uphill journey, we’re encouraged to refill our mezcal vessels. It seems like dubious advice but I oblige. The hike lasts all of 10 minutes, and while it is rather steep, it’s gloriously short. Soon, we’re led to a clearing on the other side of the hill overlooking a valley. The Union folks had clandestinely arranged for coolers filled with mezcal and beer to be delivered here, along with a dozen or so oversized mats. We take our seats—a few people lie down, and at least one member of our entourage seizes on the rugged beauty, fresh air and intense silence of the setting to doze off.

criollotacos
Carnitas tacos at Criollo, the Oaxacan restaurant by Enrique Olvera.

Soon Champ is orating again, albeit with a solemnity that befits the current mood. He pauses and tells us to appreciate how quiet it is, and we all sit motionless, still and even breathing in a whisper for what seems like 10 minutes. It’s disconcerting for me, so used to the thrum of the city, and I’m guessing it is for most of the 20 or so people around me, as there’s a group meditation going on.

We’ve been together nearly 24 hours as a group, but now, sitting on the hillside, we individually introduce ourselves to the group and talk about what we’re doing there. The speeches last between 2 and 10 minutes, and vary from first-person accounts of how a bar manager first had Champ walk into their establishment and encourage them to take a chance on Mezcal Unión to inspiring tales of setting up makeshift cafeterias to serve victims after the earthquakes hit Oaxaca and Mexico City to an artist who detailed the founding of an art fair with the assistance of the mezcal brand’s owner.

Even the guy taking a nap was called upon, and he somehow roused himself, spoke surprisingly eloquently about his introduction to Unión Mezcal, and promptly laid back down on the mat to resume his slumber.

It was all very moving, at times inspiring, and it made me think that if I were inadvertently being indoctrinated into a cult and that this would be my new home, it wouldn’t be such a bad way to live. Unless of course they didn’t let us drink the mezcal anymore.

Soon enough though, we were being led back down the dirt trail for more food, more mezcal, and a night of dancing, stargazing, dreaming. As dinner ended and darkness descended, Tonio, one of Mezcal Unión’s founders, showed off his skills in the DJ booth. The tables got pushed aside and at least half of the group, along with a few of the farmers, hit the dance floor. A few songs in, the lights began to dim and the music cut out; maybe getting a reliable generator out in the Oaxacan desert is too much to ask, even for folks who are clearly geniuses when it comes to planning and entertaining.

Not to worry, however! A fix is found and soon the music grows louder as the stars in the sky become brighter and the dancing becomes more frenetic and, well, when you find yourself to be lucky enough to be faux-moonwalking to a Michael Jackson song on a Mexican palenque with a couple dozen newfound friends, you find yourself reflecting on what correct decisions in life led you to this place in time.

But wait! We’re not done with the evening yet. Down at the bonfire, people are starting to gather. Soon, a marching band and two of the giant puppets known as mojigangas are approaching our group from the path we’d parked on about 12 hours earlier. The mojigangas are about 10 feet tall and made of papier-mache; they’re depicting a man and a woman, and there’s also a celebratory ball made of the same material being twirled around by a third puppeteer. Meanwhile, the group of young musicians, who I find out come from the nearest town, play festive songs on their trumpets and trombones, a fitting accompaniment for the long-armed puppets who turn and sway to the music.

mezcal union bottle
Mezcal Unión El Viejo is made from espadin and sought-after tobala agave. Its “joven” is more widely available in the U.S.

At this point, the night is becoming a blur, literally and figuratively, but I’ve learned a lot about mezcal production, as well as seeing firsthand how a responsible, apparently profitable and socially ambitious business could be run by a few friends and a supporting cast.

This wouldn’t even be my last day in Oaxaca, but it was surely the most soul-enriching experience for all of us on the trip. Some of us would stay another day, then another, then even another. Thanks to Aeromexico’s seemingly lax attitude about honoring flight plans and schedules, it’s not an entirely easy thing to get to Oaxaca, and more than a few people I’ve spoken to find it an even harder place to leave. I get that now, and while I can’t guarantee that you’ll have an experience that’ll lead to an all-night dance party in the desert, I can point you in a few directions to make your Oaxaca journey a mezcal-fueled success. See below for more.


Oaxaca Dining & Drinking Tips

You probably won’t find a tour along the lines of what I describe above, but the Mezcalistas website has some advice about trying to get out into the palenques. As for other things to do in and around Oaxaca, there is way more than I can list here, but I’ve assembled a few recommendations for where to eat and drink. Some are places I went to during my four-day stay; others were recommended by Oaxaca regulars I contacted through friends in the food and drinks biz.

Criollo: The first restaurant in Oaxaca by Enrique Olvera, whose Mexico City restaurants are amongst the country’s best-known. He’s also behind New York City’s Cosme and Atla.

La Popular: A conveniently located corner bar with decent small bites, a block or so up from the Templo de Santo Domingo.

Zandunga and Biznaga: Two Oaxacan restaurants also conveniently located in the city and recommended by friends.

Mezcaloteca: A mezcal tasting bar where you can learn a lot about this special spirit, from the different plants used in distilling to the regional distinctions and more. Reach out in advance and plan for two or three hours of tasting. 

oaxacacoffee
Boulenc is a bakery, restaurant and café where even the coffee cups deliver high style.

Boulenc: A stylish bakery and café that doubles as a showcase for Oaxacan design. It’s a beautiful place to sit and have coffee and a delicious sandwich.

Itanoni: An all-heirloom corn restaurant. Because the world needs more heirloom corn.

Mezcalogia: Depends on who you ask, but some people say this is the best mezcal bar in Oaxaca, if not the world.

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We Dig The Ludlow’s Guide To Eating In NYC’s Lower East Side http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/ludlows-guide-lower-east-side/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/ludlows-guide-lower-east-side/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 15:00:32 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178390 If there’s one thing New York City hotels all need, it’s a friendly, concise, expertly curated guide to the neighborhood’s best eats. Lower East Side mainstay The Ludlow is handing out these cool little maps to make sure you end up exactly where you want. Here’s the map’s legend — check out all these great […]

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If there’s one thing New York City hotels all need, it’s a friendly, concise, expertly curated guide to the neighborhood’s best eats. Lower East Side mainstay The Ludlow is handing out these cool little maps to make sure you end up exactly where you want. Here’s the map’s legend — check out all these great spots with expert “good to know” tips!

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The map’s creators, longtime friends Maryse Chevriere and Yasmin Fahr, are veterans of the food media industry. Chevriere is a sommelier and freelance food and beverage writer who was most recently the Wine Director at Dominique Crenn’s acclaimed San Francisco restaurant, Petit Crenn. In 2016, she won the James Beard Award for humor for her Instagram account, @Freshcutgardenhose. Fahr is the founder of travel site LokaPack, and a food and travel writer with more than a decade of experience writing about hundreds of restaurants and hotels. This is the team you want giving you dining recommendations.

“Whenever I checked into a hotel, especially in a new city, I always wished there were a curated list of cool and interesting things to do nearby available in the room,” says Fahr. “Something that was put together by someone I could trust (a.k.a. not randomly pulled from a Google search).” Says Chevriere, the illustrator, “These are perfect for boutique hotels that don’t necessarily have a dedicated concierge staff or especially for homestay experiences where you’re really on your own when it comes to this kind of advice.”

The Ludlow Hotel guide is their first creation, and they’re currently meeting with other hotels and homestay programs to create customized guides. The maps are presented as double-sided postcards, so they can serve as a memento you can easily slip into your bag or bring home to tack on the fridge. That way you can show everyone you ate your weight in, say, smoked fish at Russ & Daughters.

“The idea is to make dynamic, easily digestible and — most importantly — genuinely useful dining guides for travelers,” adds Chevriere. “They’ll be tailored to the neighborhood and vibe/clientele of the hotel. I know we’re all on our phones 24/7, but I think there’s something to be said for an efficient, tangible, trustworthy guide that saves you a little time from all the scrolling and cross-referencing of blogs and food websites.”

Take another look and tell us you’re not revving up your engine to hit a world-renowned candy store, small-batch ice cream shop and cutting-edge raw bar all in one delectable afternoon.

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How To Dine At Noma’s Last Available Reservation For As Little As $10 http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/noma-last-available-reservation/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/noma-last-available-reservation/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:00:25 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178403 There’s just one last table available at Noma’s re-opening night on February 15! And it could be yours for as little as $10. Noma is partnering with Omaze to offer a trip for you and a guest to Copenhagen to dine at one of the world’s best restaurants. But it gets better! Return the next […]

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There’s just one last table available at Noma’s re-opening night on February 15! And it could be yours for as little as $10.

Noma is partnering with Omaze to offer a trip for you and a guest to Copenhagen to dine at one of the world’s best restaurants. But it gets better! Return the next day for coffee and to check out their funky fermentation labs, all on the house. Simply donate at least $10 to MAD, and you’ll be entered for a chance to win. The René Redzepi–backed non-profit organization started out as a symposium dedicated to educating groups about the importance of foraging, sustainable cooking and more.

Reservations for opening night sold out in less than 24 hours and the waitlist is over 35,000 long. Deadline for entries is January 31, with winners announced on February 7. Still need to be convinced? Check out the video below. We know we’ll be entering!

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Listen To Food Republic Today: Phil Rosenthal http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/frt-phil-rosenthal/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/18/frt-phil-rosenthal/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 12:00:55 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178408 Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please rate the podcast and leave comments! Subscribe: Apple | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn The creator of Everybody Loves Raymond loves food, but you may have known that if you caught James Beard Award-winning I’ll Have What Phil’s Having, Phil Rosenthal’s first venture into food television. He’s back with Somebody Feed […]

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phil rosenthal
Creator of Everybody Loves Raymond, Phil Rosenthal, tells us all about his new Netflix show.

Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please rate the podcast and leave comments!

Subscribe: Apple | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn

The creator of Everybody Loves Raymond loves food, but you may have known that if you caught James Beard Award-winning I’ll Have What Phil’s Having, Phil Rosenthal’s first venture into food television. He’s back with Somebody Feed Phil (a Netflix Original produced by Food Republic’s parent company, Zero Point Zero Production) and he’s here today to tell us all about it! The six-episode series is now available on Netflix and follows Rosenthal to Bangkok, Tel Aviv, Mexico City and more. Also today, Bad Yelp Review of Good Restaurants in Post Bites. But first the news.

Today’s News:

  • How your hand soap smells can affect how your food tastes. Danish chef Adam Aamann is creating his own scented soap to complement his dishes.
  • Nestlé is selling its U.S. chocolate and confectionary products to Ferrero in a move to focus on healthier snacks.
  • Internet sensation Salt Bae is opening his first New York restaurant.
  • Thanks to Mariah Carey, sales in tea have risen. A recent study also shows that drinking tea gets the creative juices flowing.

Further Reading/Watching:

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Food Republic Today is hosted by our Editorial Director, Richard Martin, with co-host Krista Ruane, Zero Point Zero culinary creative director, and produced by Zero Point Zero Production. Our producer is Katie Guhl with assistance from Tiffany Do and additional editing by Manuel Sander. The episode features music by Ghostly International artists including Michna, whose “Metal Baile Joint” is the theme song.

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Justin Timberlake Served (And Ate) Insects At His Album Launch http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/17/justin-timberlake-ate-insects/ http://www.foodrepublic.com/2018/01/17/justin-timberlake-ate-insects/#respond Wed, 17 Jan 2018 19:00:53 +0000 http://www.foodrepublic.com/?p=178385 Pop singer Justin Timberlake is a woodsman now, everyone! If the album art for his latest release, Man of the Woods (out February 2nd), didn’t tip you off immediately, the menu for yesterday’s launch party in New York City should do the trick. The AP reports that partygoers enjoyed “ants coated in black garlic and […]

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Pop singer Justin Timberlake is a woodsman now, everyone! If the album art for his latest release, Man of the Woods (out February 2nd), didn’t tip you off immediately, the menu for yesterday’s launch party in New York City should do the trick.

The AP reports that partygoers enjoyed “ants coated in black garlic and rose oil, and grasshoppers,” among other bug and non-bug treats whipped up by chefs from Copenhagen’s culinary mecca, Noma.

“The outdoors is the inspiration for a lot of these songs. That’s the main idea,” says JT in an Instagram video. “The tour will be able to bring the outside in.”

Well yeah, bringing the outside in is totally how you get ants.

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