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Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/diekatrin/">diekatrin</a> on Flickr
Instead of sticking with the mushrooms and swiss of yore, I have taken quiche into the modern day by using ingredients like pancetta and cilantro. I like to call them “uniquiches.” (Try to say that three times fast.) Now if I could just outfit my husband with that retro “Real Men Eat Quiche” t-shirt he’s been coveting, all would be right in the world.

It’s happened. I am officially a member of the society of those who, with astounding regularity, find themselves fondly reminiscing the good old days. Trouble is, they were the 1980s, not our most sophisticated decade. Microwaves were the modern kitchen’s savior and Tuna Helper’s sodium levels were never questioned. But in stark contrast, my own working mom was a pioneer forging home-ec trails. She was turning out homemade curries and crêpes while most moms were choosing canned Chow Mein and calling it Oriental Night.

We’ve seen ’80s nostalgia cropping up in music and fashion, but surprisingly I’ve also found my cooking beginning to mimic that sentimentality. More and more I find homemade quiche fits the bill, any meal, any day. It is, after all, a versatile, inexpensive nod to the decade of my youth. But instead of sticking with the mushrooms and swiss of yore, I have taken quiche into 2011 by using ingredients like pancetta and cilantro. I like to call them “uniquiches.” (Try to say that three times fast.)

Now if I could just outfit my husband with that retro “Real Men Eat Quiche” t-shirt he’s been coveting, all would be right in the world.