KFC hot chicken album
The limited-release record celebrating KFC hot chicken

Here at Food Republic, we’re big fans of Nashville hot chicken. Yuuuge fans, in fact. And even that may be an understatement. We’ve written extensively about the dish’s long history and traditions, illustrated an extensive map pointing out the locations at which one can find the dish nationwide, and watched in admiration as the fiery bird transformed from a Music City specialty to a full-blown “trend” in 2016. Of course, one unfortunate aspect of being branded as such is the inevitable exploitation of the dish on a large-scale basis. Case in point: KFC hot chicken. We shared our gut-wrenching, emotionally honest thoughts about the fast-food chain’s January 2016 national hot-chicken release in an article earlier this year.

Just when hot-chicken purists thought the dish-bastardization nightmare would coincide with the end of the chain’s “limited-time offer,” KFC found a way to once again break our spicy poultry–loving hearts. KFC hot chicken is now available as a menu item until at least April 2017, with the chain extending the limited run as a result of the item’s supposed widespread success. KFC has also introduced new menu items in the line, such as Extra-Crispy Tenders, Extra-Crispy Chicken and a Chicken Little Sandwich.

KFC hot chicken album
The back cover of the KFC hot chicken album.

Adding insult to injury, the chain announced yesterday that it has created — get this — a “Nashville hot” record, dedicated solely to celebrating KFC hot chicken. The album was produced and performed by actor and comedic personality Fred Armisen, continuing the chain’s recent enlistment of comedians and actors to help spread the chicken gospel (alas, Armisen does not don a colonel getup).

A select number of the “limited edition” albums have been placed in 14 record stores across the country, while the “soulful and spicy” songs can also be heard online at Nashville Hot Record. According to a statement, the release of said record pays homage to the Colonel’s tradition of producing his own vinyl albums, dating back to the 1960s. The songs are “best enjoyed with” — wouldn’t you know it — “the spicy, smoky flavor and crispy crunch of KFC hot chicken.” Please — for the love of Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack — make it stop!