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The presidential election has apparently got people staying at home more and ordering pizza. (Photo: ztm/Flickr.)

Sometimes you need a little help to find what you’re looking for. Whether it’s learning a bird call to scout out some local honey, enduring a stressful election year in order to perk up your sales or going completely meatless to feed others, a new study or skill could lead you to a million riches (or some bees).

Going vegan won’t actually help world hunger

Mic reports on a new study suggesting that cutting meat from the standard American diet could help maximize cropland and feed 100 percent more people. The study also found, however, that a completely vegan diet would not solve any hunger issue and that a “happy medium between veganism and the standard American diet” is best. Eighty percent of U.S. croplands alone are used for animal feed, with the remaining 20 percent growing fruits, vegetables and grains for human consumption. This model feeds 400 million people. An updated model could feed up to 800 million people.

This sweet bird will lead you to honey

Most of us hunt for honey in the supermarket aisle or farmers’ market stands. The Yao people of Mozambique in Africa rely on a bird, the honeyguide. The Atlantic reports that bird responds to a “brrr-hm” call and will lead humans to beehives, where they’ll distract bees with fire and other tools, extract the sweet, sweet honey and then leave some honeycomb behind for the bird to eat. This isn’t your classic human-domesticates-wild-animal story. According to The Atlantic, the honeyguide was the first to initiate the working relationship with its own human call, “tirr-tirr-tirr-tirr.”

Delivery pizza is leading the election polls

It’s no secret that the 2016 U.S. presidential race is a mess that can only be alleviated with delivery pizza. Quartz reports that sit-down restaurants have seen a slight decrease in business while delivery services, namely pizza delivery, have gone up this year. Restaurant analyst Chris O’Cull theorizes that the “civil and political disruptions that have negatively impacted restaurant dining may be helping pizza operators that deliver to customers.”