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Give thanks while you're across the pond.

Finding all the ingredients to whip up a Thanksgiving meal in London is easier than you think. We’ve assembled a guide for procuring the holiday essentials for the big day, and some restaurants that do the work for you.

Essentials

Copas Turkeys
Since 1957, the Copas family has been raising some of Britain’s tastiest organic and free range turkeys. Before meeting the chopping block, they spend their days on Kings Coppice Farm among the rolling green dales of the Thames River valley in Berkshire, where the Copas family also raise chickens, lamb and prep condiments like tart chutneys and cranberry sauce. Copas has a really handy website and delivery service too, which makes life easier if you’re not a fan of fighting through holiday shopping crowds. On their website you can read up on their range of turkeys — under what conditions they are raised, their breed, and so on — and choose a turkey according to how many people you plan to feed. Copas also sells prepped turkey crowns and breast roasts in various sizes for those who don’t need or want a whole bird for their Thanksgiving or Christmas feasts. +44 01628 499980; turkeys@copas.co.uk; www.copasturkeys.co.uk

The Ginger Pig features a bacon-wrapped turkey.

The Ginger Pig
If you’re prepared to shell out more that £50 for a toothsome main course, you might try buying an organic bird from the Ginger Pig. Orders need to be placed 48 hours in advance, and they can be taken online, over the phone or in person at one of their six locations across London. These posh butchers carry a vast range of meats, and usually some cooking essentials, baked goods, and bits and bobs like chutneys, preserves and a variety of pâtés and terrines for laying out for peckish guests before dinner. 99 Laureston Road, Hackney, E9 7HJ; +44 (0)20 8986 6911; www.thegingerpig.co.uk

Borough Market
It’s hard to find anything on the cheap at London’s recently renovated Borough Market. In fact, what you find here is a lot of redundancy — how many comte cheesemongers do we really need? What is good about this market is its central location next to the London Bridge tube station. But be prepared to open your wallet. Most of the market is closed during the week, but some produce and meat vendors have special opening hours during big holidays like Christmas. It’s the kind of place you come to early on a Saturday morning or late in the afternoon before closing when the bakery stands often give away loaves, and produce sellers offer two for one deals on fruit and vegetables. 8 Southwark St; +44 (0)20 7407 1002; www.boroughmarket.org.uk

Maltby Street Market
Unlike most London’s markets, Maltby doesn’t live in a defined cluster. It is spread out and fragmented under the elevated train arches, around Druid Street, and of course, along Maltby Street. Many of the vendors were priced out of Borough Market and moved here. Still, the prices are comparable and the crowds are certainly thinner. Kernel Beer, St. John’s Bakery and Monmouth Coffee all have outposts here. There are many good cheese mongers, and Italian delis selling cured meats. The atmosphere is young and lively, and there are some good bars and tapas places where you can refuel while you check off your shopping list. Maltby St. SE1 3PA; www.maltby.st

Brixton Market
Most of Brixton Markets shops, restaurants, produce, meat and fish vendors remain open 7 days a week. The best part about this south London market is its souk-like sensibility; here you find vendors peddling everything from Jamaican jerk and designer coffee to cheese graters, pots and pans, and linens. Though further away from central London than Maltby or Borough Markets, the atmosphere is livelier, the prices lower, and the one-stop-shop appeal is worth the trip south for last minute purchases of kitchen tools and ingredients. Electric Avenue, Brixton, SW9 8JX; +44 (0)7960 942060; www.brixtonmarket.net


Cheese Monger
Paxton&Whitfield

Since 1797, Paxton &Whitfield have been hawking hard, soft, blue and fresh cheeses to Londoners. Their stock and knowledge of cheese is so vast that they’ve been appointed cheesemonger to English kings and queens, like Queen Victoria and King Edward V. It’s worth coming into their shop to learn a bit about pairing cheeses with wines. The cheesemongers here are extremely knowledgeable and will share information about the provenance and manufacturing process of each cheese they carry. Their original Jermyn Street shop is a gem, and, cheese aside, half the delight of shopping here. You can also order everything you need online and have it delivered, or build a gift basket for your holiday hosts. 93 Jermyn St; SW1Y 6JE; www.paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk; +44 (0) 20 7930 0259


Wine & Spirits

Barry Bros. & Rudd
Established in the 17th century, Barry Bros. & Rudd is London’s oldest wine merchant and the go-to spot for splashing out on excellent and hard to find tipples for your guests. Their charming London shop on St. James Street carries a range of more than 4,000 wines and spirits, and 40 different lines of their own range wines. It doesn’t matter if your knowledge of wines is dim. Their helpful staff of wine connoisseurs are on hand to help your pair your meal with the perfect wine. Barry Bros. & Rudd host regular wine events, like wine tastings, and a clutch of various wine courses for those who want to show off at dinner. 3 St. James St, SW1A 1EG; 0800 280 2440; www.bbr.com

The Bottle Apostle’s two east London locations feature a nice range of wines, ciders and ales, minus any pretension.

Bottle Apostle
The ethos at Bottle Apostle’s two north east London shops is that shopping for wine should be an easy and enjoyable experience. They try not to let customers feel intimidated by the affordable and mid and high range stock that they carry, and even color code all the wines in their shops and online according to how they can be matched with food. They don’t explain and describe the taste of their products in any esoteric sort of way; they are straight forward and lighthearted about what they sell. They also carry cider, spirits, ales, and handy enomatic machines that dispense wine for you to sample before you buy. 95 Lauriston Road, Hackney; E9 7HJ +44 020 8985 1549; www.bottleapostle.com


Restaurants

Pilgrim punch from Riding House Cafe.

Riding House Café 
Only a handful of restaurants have the culinary offerings of Thanksgiving on the actual day. This year, London’s Riding House Café is offering guests all the holiday trimmings for £35 per person. That gets you Norfolk bronze roast turkey doused in calvados gravy, cornbread and sausage stuffing, cranberry and orange relish, maple butter mashed sweet potatoes, truffled mac & cheese, brussels sprouts with bacon and raft of other dishes to share. Save room for their pumpkin brûlée pie. 43-51 Great Titchfield St, W1W 7PQ; +44 20 7927 0840; www.ridinghousecafe.co.uk

Cut at 45 Park Lane
The menu for Thanksgiving night at The Cut, an upscale eatery inside the Dorchester Collection’s 45 Park Lane Hotel, offers a range of holiday favorites. The meal commences with velvety pumpkin soup and moves on to roasted turkey, red jewell sweet potato gratin, and many other savoury dishes before wrapping up with sweets like bourbon pecan pie. Try their Thanksgiving cocktail, a spin on a classic martini made with Russian Imperial Vodka, dry vermouth, and finished with a sparking rim of crushed orange crisps and violet sugar. 45 Park Ln, W1K 1PN; +44 20 7493 4545; www.dorchestercollection.com