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Awh, ghee. Actually it's pronounced with a hard "g." Ghee is the Indian name for clarified butter, or butter which has had the milk solids removed. How do you make it and why use it instead of butter? All will be answered after the jump.

Awh, ghee. Actually it’s pronounced with a hard “g.” Ghee is the Indian name for clarified butter, or butter which has had the milk solids removed. 

The process of removing milk solids from butter is incredibly easy — simply heat butter over a low flame and skim off the white particles that rise to the top. Continue until no more solids rise to the top, pour into a container and allow to solidify (refrigerated or not) and boom, you have ghee. It will be yellower and more translucent rather than milky-opaque. It will also smell like we imagine how heaven smells: buttery and sweet.

Why use it instead of butter? Ghee has a higher smoke point and is suitable for higher-heat frying, where you want the butter taste without the inevitable smoking…and burning. It melts at a higher temperature than butter, making it ideal for the incredibly buttery desserts India is famous for. It’s also great for finishing a dish that needs a little (or a lot of) extra butter flavor, like steak or popcorn. 

Try it out on Garlic-Cilantro Naan or Sweet Potato Pakoras and see the difference. 

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